No Comments
A Motu trading ship with its characteristic crab claw shaped sails. Taken in the period 1903-1904. Source: Trustees of The British Museum, CC BY-NC-SA
A Motu trading ship with its characteristic crab claw shaped sails. Taken in the period 1903-1904. Source: Trustees of The British Museum, CC BY-NC-SA

via The Conversation, 11 April 2019: Archaeological research from Papua New Guinea and possible interactions with Australia from 2,700 years ago.

It has long been assumed that Indigenous Australia was isolated until Europeans arrived in 1788, except for trade with parts of present day Indonesia beginning at least 300 years ago. But our recent archaeological research hints of at least an extra 2,100 years of connections across the Coral Sea with Papua New Guinea.

Over the past decade, we have conducted research in the Gulf of Papua with local Indigenous communities.

During the excavations, the most common archaeological evidence found in the old village sites was fragments of pottery, which preserve well in tropical environments compared to artefacts made of wood or bone. As peoples of the Gulf of Papua have no known history of pottery making, and the materials are foreign, the discovered pottery sherds are evidence of trade.

This pottery began arriving in the Gulf of Papua some 2,700 years ago, according to carbon dating of charcoal found next to the sherds.

Source: Archaeology is unravelling new stories about Indigenous seagoing trade on Australia’s doorstep

Found this site useful? Show support by Buying Me a Coffee

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.