Numerous motifs discovered in rock art site on Kaimear Island

No Comments
Source: Antara News 20190416
Source: Antara News 20190416
Source: Antara News 20190416

via Antara News, 16 April 2019: Rock art discovered on Kaimear Island in Maluku, located high up on a cliff!

The Maluku Archaeological Center recorded and reported the finding of an archaeological site on Kaimear Island, Pulau-Pulau Kur Sub-district, Tual City, Maluku, October 2018, containing several hundred motifs, pending systematic and intensive research for identification.

“The number of images of rock art motifs on Kaimear Island had yet to be ascertained. Our observations estimate the number to reach 300 to 400 images that can still be clearly seen though some could not be identified, as they had faded or deteriorated,” Wuri Handoko, the Maluku Archeological Center’s archaeologist, revealed here, Monday.

Handoko pointed out that of the rows of painted rock art sites found in Maluku Islands, Kaimear Island site’s discovery is the sole one on a high cliff located 80 to 100 meters above sea level.

Source: Numerous motifs discovered in rock art site on Kaimear Island – ANTARA News

Archaeology is unravelling new stories about Indigenous seagoing trade on Australia’s doorstep

No Comments
A Motu trading ship with its characteristic crab claw shaped sails. Taken in the period 1903-1904. Source: Trustees of The British Museum, CC BY-NC-SA
A Motu trading ship with its characteristic crab claw shaped sails. Taken in the period 1903-1904. Source: Trustees of The British Museum, CC BY-NC-SA
A Motu trading ship with its characteristic crab claw shaped sails. Taken in the period 1903-1904. Source: Trustees of The British Museum, CC BY-NC-SA

via The Conversation, 11 April 2019: Archaeological research from Papua New Guinea and possible interactions with Australia from 2,700 years ago.

It has long been assumed that Indigenous Australia was isolated until Europeans arrived in 1788, except for trade with parts of present day Indonesia beginning at least 300 years ago. But our recent archaeological research hints of at least an extra 2,100 years of connections across the Coral Sea with Papua New Guinea.

Over the past decade, we have conducted research in the Gulf of Papua with local Indigenous communities.

During the excavations, the most common archaeological evidence found in the old village sites was fragments of pottery, which preserve well in tropical environments compared to artefacts made of wood or bone. As peoples of the Gulf of Papua have no known history of pottery making, and the materials are foreign, the discovered pottery sherds are evidence of trade.

This pottery began arriving in the Gulf of Papua some 2,700 years ago, according to carbon dating of charcoal found next to the sherds.

Source: Archaeology is unravelling new stories about Indigenous seagoing trade on Australia’s doorstep

Studies of fossil teeth reveal another Pleistocene ape species from Southeast Asia

No Comments
Comparison of a lower jaw fragment of Meganthropus with an Orangutan jaw and a reconstructed jaw of Homo erectus. Source: Senckenberg via Phys.org, 20190409
Comparison of a lower jaw fragment of Meganthropus with an Orangutan jaw and a reconstructed jaw of Homo erectus. Source: Senckenberg via Phys.org, 20190409
Comparison of a lower jaw fragment of Meganthropus with an Orangutan jaw and a reconstructed jaw of Homo erectus. Source: Senckenberg via Phys.org, 20190409

via Phys.org, 09 April 2019: Another ancient hominid species was discovered in Indonesia earlier this month, described in another paper in Nature – ‘Evidence for increased hominid diversity in the Early to Middle Pleistocene of Indonesia‘.

Together with an international team, Senckenberg scientists were able to document an additional fossil ape species in the Senckenberg hominid collection. The new species had already been described in 1950 as Meganthropus palaeojavanicus by Gustav Heinrich Ralph von Koenigswald, the founder of Senckenberg’s paleoanthropological department, but at the time it was interpreted as a prehistoric human. Examinations of the anatomical dental structures now reveal that approximately one million years ago at least three additional species of hominids shared the habitat of Homo erectus on Java. The study is published today in the scientific journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.

More than 200 fossil teeth and jaw fragments have been discovered on the Indonesian island of Java to date. The majority of these hominid remains can be attributed to the extinct species Homo erectus, the first early human discovered outside of Europe. It is known that Homo erectus lived on Java during the time of the Pleistocene, approximately one million years ago, in the company of the ancestors of the modern-day Orangutans,” explains PD Dr. Ottmar Kullmer of the Senckenberg Research Institute in Frankfurt, and he continues, “We were now able to show that yet another species of ape existed there at the same time.”

Source: Studies of fossil teeth reveal another Pleistocene ape species from Southeast Asia

Batujaya Temple complex listed as national cultural heritage

No Comments
Candi Batujaya. Stock photo from Erick Doorka Purba / Shutterstock
Candi Batujaya. Stock photo from Erick Doorka Purba / Shutterstock
Candi Batujaya. Stock photo from Erick Doorka Purba / Shutterstock

via Jakarta Post, 08 April 2019:

The Education and Culture Ministry has named Batujaya Temple complex in Karawang regency, West Java, an item of national cultural heritage. The government will now make an effort to better publicize the complex.

The declaration is stated in Education and Culture Ministerial Decree No.70/2019, signed by the minister, Muhadjir Effendy, on March. 11 in Jakarta.

“We just received the letter, and we will inform the public shortly,” Firman Sofyan, head of culture at the Karawang Tourism and Culture Agency said on Thursday as quoted by Tempo.co.

Prior to getting the recognition archaeologists carried out research at Batujaya Temple.

Source: Batujaya Temple complex listed as national cultural heritage – Art & Culture – The Jakarta Post

Sambut Hardiknas, Balai Arkeologi Papua akan putar film Situs Tutari

No Comments
Source: Jubi, 20190405
Source: Jubi, 20190405
Source: Jubi, 20190405

via Jubi, 05 Apr 2019: The Papua archaeology Center will host a film screening and activities directed at teachers to share information about the Tutari megalithic site. Article is in Bahasa Indonesia.

Dalam rangka memperingati dan memeriahkan Hari Pendidikan Nasional 2019, Balai Arkeologi Papua rencananya akan mengadakan pemutaran film Situs Megalitik Tutari, serta Sosialisasi Rumah Peradaban Situs Megalitik Tutari, pada pertengahan April 2019 mendatang.

Rencananya, dalam kegiatan tersebut akan diundang 50 orang guru dari jenjang pendidikan SD, SMP, SMA di Kabupaten Jayapura dan Kota Jayapura.

Source: Sambut Hardiknas, Balai Arkeologi Papua akan putar film Situs Tutari – JUBI

Categories: Indonesia Megaliths

Tags:

Baby sharks found in Sentani after deadly flood

No Comments
Sharks in Lake Sentani. Source: Jakarta Post, 20190319
Sharks in Lake Sentani. Source: Jakarta Post, 20190319
Sharks in Lake Sentani. Source: Jakarta Post, 20190319

via Jakarta Post, 19 Mar 2019: The headline doesn’t sound very archaeological, but the underlying story reveals a changing landscape over geological time which have led sharks to adapt to a freshwater environment.

Sentani is located about 36 kilometers from downtown Jayapura. Iconic Lake Sentani, the largest lake in Papua, is located at an altitude of 75 meters above sea level.

A researcher from the Papua Archaeological Center, Hari Suroto, said in the past the lake formed part of the sea but had moved inland over the centuries, therefore there were records that showed sharks had lived in its waters.

“This part of the sea is connected to rivers and springs on the Cycloops mountain,” he said on Tuesday as quoted by antaranews.com.

The movement of the earth’s layers, Hari added, had changed Lake Sentani into a fresh water body.

Source: Baby sharks found in Sentani after deadly flood – National – The Jakarta Post

Categories: Indonesia

Tags:

Banjir Sentani Tenggelamkan Warisan Megalitik

No Comments
Floods in the Lake Sentani region, Papua. Source: Papua Bisnis, 20190321
Floods in the Lake Sentani region, Papua. Source: Papua Bisnis, 20190321
Floods in the Lake Sentani region, Papua. Source: Papua Bisnis, 20190321

via Papua Bisnis.com, 21 Mar 2019: Floods in Lake Sentani have also drowned out some megalithic sites in Papua. Article is in Bahasa Indonesia.

Banjir yang melanda Sentani membuat air Danau Sentani meluap,selain merendam permukiman penduduk, juga menenggelamkan tinggalan megalitik berupa papan batu di Situs Tanjung Warakho, Kampung Doyo Lama, Distrik Waibu, Kabupaten Jayapura, Papua.

Demikian disampaikan Peneliti dari Balai Arkeologi Papua Hari Suroto kepada Antara di Jayapura, Kamis (21/3/2019). Menurut dia, Banjir yang melanda Sentani membuat air Danau Sentani meluap.

Selain merendam permukiman penduduk, kata Hari, ternyata luapan air ini juga menenggelamkan tinggalan megalitik berupa papan batu di Situs Tanjung Warakho, Kampung Doyo Lama, Distrik Waibu, Kabupaten Jayapura.

Source: Banjir Sentani Tenggelamkan Warisan Megalitik

Toll road construction hits archaeological sites in East Java

No Comments
Bajang Ratu gate in Trowulan, Mojokerto, East Java. Stock photos from Shutterstock / Indonesiapix
Bajang Ratu gate in Trowulan, Mojokerto, East Java. Stock photos from Shutterstock / Indonesiapix
Bajang Ratu gate in Trowulan, Mojokerto, East Java. Stock photos from Shutterstock / Indonesiapix

via Jakarta Post, 16 March 2019:

A site thought to be from the Majapahit Kingdom has been found in Sekarpuro subdistrict, Malang regency, East Java, during the development of section V of the Malang-Pandaan toll road project.

The discovery has put the construction on hold, according to the president director of state-owned toll road operator PT Jasa Marga Pandaan-Malang, Agus Purnomo.

“We are waiting for the result of the study conducted by the Cultural Heritage Preservation Center [BPCB] and will coordinate with the BPCB in Trowulan [East Java] regarding the finding,” Agus said on Sunday.

The finding was a brick structure resembling stairs and bricks scattered on the site of the toll road construction. Each of the bricks is about 45 x 60 centimeters wide with a thickness of 7 cm.

Source: Toll road construction hits archaeological sites in East Java – National – The Jakarta Post

Categories: Indonesia

Tags:

Yuan Dynasty ceramics found in East Java

No Comments
Yuan Dynasty ceramics in Java. Source: Pontianak Post, 20190315
Yuan Dynasty ceramics in Java. Source: Pontianak Post, 20190315
Yuan Dynasty ceramics in Java. Source: Pontianak Post, 20190315

via Pontianak Post, 15 Mar 2019: Yuan Dynasty ceramics found in East Java. Article is in Bahasa Indonesia.

Penyerangan tentara Tar Tar dipimpin Kubilai Khan, ke Singhasari atau Singosari, Jawa Timur, pada abad ke-13 bisa ditemukan jejaknya di Pulau Serutu dan Pulau Karimata, Kabupaten Kayong Utara. Bukti kuat mereka pernah singgah ini, ada pada prasasti batu yang terdapat di Pasir Kapal dan Pasir Cina Dusun Serutu.

Batu yang bertuliskan huruf cina, berhasil diterjemahkan Peneliti Balai Arkeologi Banjarmasin Imam Hindarto. Menurutnya, untuk meneliti tulisan tersebut dia meminta bantuan temannya yang kuliah di Prancis. “Banyak tulisannya yang sudah usang dan tidak terbaca, namun ada tulisan yang sangat jelas di batu tersebut yang sangat besar yakni menyebutkan negara Yuan,” jelasnya Kamis (14/3).

Source: Jejak Kubilai Khan Diteliti | Pontianak Post

Categories: Ceramics Indonesia

Tags: