[Talk] Why Was There No Singapore Before Raffles?

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Readers in Singapore may be interested in this talk at ISEAS next Wedneday

Why Was There No Singapore Before Raffles?
Date : Wednesday, 18 July 2018
Time : 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Venue : ISEAS Seminar Room 2

This seminar will examine issues in the writing about the history of Singapore before 1819. Sir Stamford Raffles and Dr John Crawfurd, the second Resident of Singapore, lead in reporting that Singapore was uninhabited before the British arrived. Generations of historians have concurred with this description of Singapore at 1819 and gone further to claim, as former Professors K G Tregonning and C M Turnbull have done, that whatever may have happened on Singapore before 1819 is irrelevant to the island’s historical development thereafter. This seminar explores the assumptions underlying this understanding of Singapore’s history and how the work at the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre is challenging and revising these assumptions.

William Willetts Lecture 2012: Art of Angkor: Monuments and their Dating

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Readers in Singapore may be interested in this upcoming lecture at the National Library, held in conjunction with the Southeast Asian Ceramic Society AGM.

SEACS 43rd AGM & William Willetts Lecture 2012 [Link no longer active]
Time: 6.45pm
Date: Friday, 30 March 2012
Venue: The POD, Level 16, National Library Board, Victoria Street

his year’s lecture, tentatively entitled “Art of Angkor: Monuments and their Dating”, will be given by Prof. Kwa Chong Guan, author of the book, 700 years of Singapore History.

The lecture begins with William Willetts’ interest in Angkor monuments. The lecture proceeds to discuss the challenges of dating the Angkor monuments and how the art historian Philip Stern developed a “method” of attempting it in the late 1920’s, which later influenced a whole generation of French scholars – P Dupont, J Bosselier, M Bernstein, among others – down to today. The talk will broadly cover the wider issue of dating art by its style and not get too technical on art history methodologies and Angkor art.

Summary of lecture
The lecture begins with William Willetts’ interest in Angkor monuments. The lecture proceeds to discuss the challenges of dating the Angkor monuments and how the art historian Philip Stern developed a “method” of attempting it in the late 1920’s, which later influenced a whole generation of French scholars – P. Dupont, J. Bosselier, M. Bernstein, among others – down to today. The talk will broadly cover the wider issue of dating art by its style and not get too technical on art history methodologies and Angkor art. A more developed lecture will be delivered to archaeology students of the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre’s Archaeological Unit who are currently doing a field trip in Siem Reap, Cambodia.