Online Lecture Library

    Because you asked for it – here is a collection of freely-available lectures found online related to the archaeology of Southeast Asia covering topics architecture, underwater archaeology, epigraphy, ceramics, museum collections and country-specific interests. There are over 140 lectures listed in this page, easily worth two or three university courses worth of lectures! Most of these lectures are found on YouTube and are in English, and the source for each lecture is also listed. Currently the lectures are sorted by date, with the most recent lectures on top. If you are aware of any lectures that are not on the list, especially if they are not in English, please drop me an email or leave a comment so that I can update the list.

    Background: I started this page during the Covid-19 crisis after a lot of positive feedback from a previous post about collecting all the lectures in one place. This page will be updated periodically.

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    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    The long-held belief in the age of the Ifugao Rice Terraces, pegged at ca. 2000 years, as proposed by pioneer anthropologists of the Philippines Henry Otley Beyer and Roy F. Barton has become a sort of received wisdom among Filipinos.  It has been taken as a gospel truth, that even the UNESCO enlistment of the agricultural wonders highlights its long history narrative. It is no wonder then, that recent archaeological and ethnohistorical discoveries that suggest a short history origin of the terraces have become an anathema to nationalist sentiments about age of the terraces. In this presentation, we provide the scientific bases for the later dating of the terraces. By doing so, we argue that the shift to wet-rice cultivation (and the inception of rice terracing traditions) in Ifugao, Philippines was a conscious decision by the Ifugao to counter the Spanish conquest. This contention empowers Ifugao communities and forces us to rethink dominant Philippine historical narratives.

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    Source: พิพิธภัณฑ์เรือนโบราณล้านนา

    การเสวนาเรื่อง เรือนโบราณล้านนากับการอนุรักษ์ Traditional Lanna Houses and Preservation วันพฤหัสบดีที่ 2 กรกฎาคม 2563 เวลา 13.30 – 16.00 น. ในโครงการ Conservation of Traditional Lanna Architecture in Chiang Mai ภายใต้ทุนรางวัล AFCP 2019 สำนักส่งเสริมศิลปวัฒนธรรม มหาวิทยาลัยเชียงใหม่

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    Source: Adam Hardy Indian Temple Architecture

    This talk surveys the diverse traditions of Indian temple architecture and discusses patterns that can be seen in the ways they develop. A pattern of emanation, one form coming out of another, can often observed both in the formal structure of individual temple designs, which express a sequence of emergence and growth, and in the way in which temple forms develop.

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    Source: Adam Hardy Indian Temple Architecture

    Typology, for the architecture of Indian temples, is not just a matter of classification, but the basis of its origins in early wooden buildings. It is also a creative principle, by which new temple designs are invented by combining existing types. This talk explains the origins and development of the main traditions of temple architecture in the Subcontinent.

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    Source: Peabody Museum

    Matthew Spriggs, Laureate Fellow and Professor of Archaeology, Australian National University, Australia Introduced by Ingrid Ahlgren, Curator of Oceanic Collections, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, Harvard University The earliest European explorations in the Pacific region sparked speculation about the origins of Pacific Islanders. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, several archaeological studies were made in Polynesia, Micronesia, Island Melanesia, Australia, and New Guinea. Matthew Spriggs will discuss the findings of a five-year project to understand the early history of Pacific archaeology and its contributions to our understanding of human settlement in the region.

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    Source: SOAS University

    Myanmar archaeologists have worked at the site of the Anawrahta-Kyanzittha palaces (AKP) for almost 30 years. Few palaces have been excavated in Southeast Asia, so the study of the AKP site can shed significant light on our understanding of both ancient Myanmar and ancient palaces in the entire region. Burmese archaeologists have unearthed a huge quantity of evidence which supports the argument that an elite group inhabited the site, in all probability early rulers of the Bagan kingdom. The most convincing evidence comprises foundations of very large buildings, such as bricks, wood, and ceramic tiles. Artifacts recovered mainly consist of a wide variety of ceramics, votive tablets and statuary, enabling us to use them to draw inferences about daily life in the palaces. The Myanmar-Singapore Archaeological Training Project (MSATP), a joint effort between Myanmar and Singapore funded by Singapore Ministry of Education grants, focuses on analysis of ceramics and secondarily on other materials, as well as capacity building of our Burmese counterparts for whom ceramic studies are a new realm. The aim of the project is to reconstruct activities conducted in the palaces and possible socio-economic and religious changes over a period of three centuries. This presentation provides an update on research at Bagan with a focus on a project the author and her co-investigators have been undertaking since 2014. In the long term, this research should expand to provide important insights into medieval Burmese urbanism.

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    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី១៧ ខែមករា ឆ្នាំ២០២០ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, Jan 17, 2020, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)

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    Source: The Siam Society Under Royal Patronage

    In this lecture, Dr Julispong Chularatana introduces his recent study on “The Ship of Sulaiman”, an account written by Muhammad Rabi, a Persian embassy who accompanied the mission to Siam in 1686. The story was written as a “Travel Literature” with an Indo-Persian influence, mixing poem, tales, and folklore with real account experienced by the writer, presented through the view of a Persian in the seventeenth century.

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    Source: Alan Potkin

    Video archive with extensive textual, historical and interactive visual support, including navigable virtual reality panos, of the main image hall and larger temple compound at Vat Taleo Khao, in Savannakhet Province Lao PDR. The Temple compound was occupied during the 2nd Indochina War (~1963-1975) North Vietnamese regular troops infiltrating through the erstwhile Royal Kingdom of Lao on the “Ho Chi Minh Trail” and bombewd extensively by the US Air Force. While all the outbuildings and monuments were reduced to rubble, the primary structure received a direct hit from a 1,000 lb dumb bomb, which penetrated the roof but didn’t explode. The original compound was abandoned by the monks, who established a new temple 8 km away. The original building, still almost completely intact was never archived, although its architecture was extraordinary and its interior painting were devoted almost entire to the Vessantara Jataka stories (“Phavet” in Lao, “Wetandaye Zat” in Burmese), recounting the events of the last incarnation of the Buddha before his final rebirth as Prince Gautama.

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    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    Ta Reach, literally translated as the Royal Ancestor, is an impressive eight-armed statue of Vishnu – the Hindu Preserver of the World. It was the most important deity worshipped at Angkor Vat and its statue was made and consecrated inside Angkor’s central tower in the 12th Century. From approximately the 16th Century, Angkor Vat has been a Buddhist temple. During this period the statue of the Grand Vishnu was transferred to the main gate of the 3rd enclosure at the western entrance of Angkor Vat: a marginal position within the temple when the central sanctuary was closed off as a stupa for Buddhism. Since then, the statue has gradually become a local deity and a spiritual guardian of the Angkor community. Today, not only locals but worshippers living in all parts of the world still travel to Angkor Vat to pay homage to Ta Reach, not as a brahmanic god, but Neak Ta, an animistic deity of the local community. Worshippers will visit for a variety of reasons, such as for protection, to chase away bad luck, ask for good business, to bear children or to acknowledge marriages. An annual festival is held at Angkor Vat in homage to Ta Reach at the end of the harvesting season. Either a man or woman acts as a messenger, medium or incarnate of Ta Reach by receiving individual requests from worshippers. As a spiritual representative of Ta Reach, the medium performs the rite of responding to all supplications. This paper will explore how meaning and audience response in connection with the statue of Ta Reach have changed. It will discuss the ritual practices performed and the spiritual value of the statue of Ta Reach to worshippers today.

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    Source: Department of Anthropology, CUHK

    Anthropology Friday Seminar Prof. Bill JEFFERY, University of Guam, “Treasures of the Deep: Maritime Archaeology in Hong Kong, China and Asia-Pacific.”

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    Source: Department of Anthropology, CUHK

    Anthropology Friday Seminar Speaker: Prof. Steven GALLAGHER, Faculty of Law, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

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    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី៣០ ខែសីហា ឆ្នាំ២០១៩ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, Aug 30, 2019, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)

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    Source: The Siam Society Under Royal Patronage

    Mrauk U was the capital of the kingdom of Arakan (Rakhine State) for over 300 years. Compared to Venice, Amsterdam and Lisbon in its heyday in the 17th century, Mrauk U is today a provincial town with dozens of pagodas and temples that recall its great past. The opening of Myanmar, after 2011, generated international interest for hitherto little-known archaeological and historical sites in Myanmar. Yet, the ongoing Rakhine State crisis that mixes inter-ethnic conflict, state-ethnic conflict, humanitarian and rights issues, has largely prevented the development of tourism in Myanmar’s western region. Against a background of contemporary challenges, this lecture focuses on the complexity of Mrauk U’s past between Mughal India and the Burmese kingdoms. Its position at the cultural frontier between South and Southeast Asia, and its maritime context within the Bay of Bengal, invite comparisons with other Buddhist kingdoms in Southeast Asia where land and sea were associated in complex ways. The preparation of Mrauk U’s candidacy for UNESCO World Heritage status has stimulated new research, resulting in renewed understanding of the city’s urban planning, including important hydrological and defensive works. The presentation will highlight the current state of academic knowledge and introduce the original character of Rakhine civilisation.

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    Source: Singapore Bicentennial

    In this talk, Dr Imran bin Tajudeen introduces 18th century Singapore, and how it was shaped by major developments in the region at the time. These include the economic and political developments in the Johor-Riau-Lingga Sultanate, particularly the stellar growth of the wealthy port-capital at Riau up to its destruction in 1784 as a favoured international entrepot and a hub for its gambier and coconut plantation economy, both of which set precedents for Singapore’s development just a few decades later, as well as Singapore’s own links with the network of ports in Southeast Asia. He reviews the crises that beset the Riau-Johor polity across the period, what these setbacks meant for Singapore, and how they re-situate the mistaken notion of Singapore as a mere ‘fishing village’ before 1819. The imprint and continued development of pre-colonial urban form, architectural traditions, and settlement patterns in colonial Singapore that can be foregrounded as one illustration of these widened perspectives will also be discussed. Finally, Dr Imran will also touch on vicissitudes in Malay and Bugis management of international trade and competing European demands and how it set the stage for the Malay reception of the British interest in Singapore.

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    Source: The Siam Society Under Royal Patronage

    A talk by Dr Piriya Krairiksh After having earned a doctorate in History of Art from Harvard University in 1975, Prof Dr Piriya Krairiksh was employed as Curator of Asian Art at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. On his return to Thailand, Dr Piriya taught History of Art at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Thammasat University. After his retirement, he became Director of the Thai Khadi Research Institute, Thammasat University. Dr Piriya served as President of the Siam Society from 1989 to 1992 and was appointed Senior Research Scholar by the Thailand Research Fund in 1999. He has published many articles and books on Thai art both in Thai and English. He is the Chairman of the Piriya Krairiksh Foundation. In this talk, Dr Piriya Krairiksh discusses the history of the representation of the Rāmayāna in Myanmar in comparison to Siam by looking at artefacts including stone plaques from the era.

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    Source: Singapore Bicentennial

    In this talk, Dr Michael Flecker takes a look at 17th century Singapore from a maritime perspective, using shipwrecks and their cargoes, along with ancient charts and paintings to illustrate the dynamic state of politics, trade and conflict during this period. Evidence suggests that from the late 16th century Singapore was once again a busy port, and a fundamental element of the Johor riverine economy which was first established several decades after the Portuguese conquered Melaka in 1511. Contemporaneous European charts of Singapore depict a Shabandaria, the official residence of the eminent Shabandar, or harbour-master. Archaeological treasures excavated from our nearby seas, together with artefacts dredged from Singapore’s own Kallang Basin, tell new stories to complement those of our learned historians.

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    Source: Singapore Bicentennial

    In this talk, Associate Professor Peter Borschberg introduces 16th century Singapore, another period that is widely assumed to be ‘missing’ in Singapore’s history. His research however reveals a turbulent world, where Singapore was both centre stage to numerous battles, alliances and defeats as well as being a part of a busy trade waterways in the region. The rise of Aceh and the arrival of the Dutch in the region during the 1590s changed the flow of trade and the balance of power in the Straits.

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    Source: Singapore Bicentennial

    In this talk, Dr Tai Yew Seng introduces 15th century Singapore. This fascinating lecture will provide insights on what is often described as ‘Singapore’s missing century’. By piecing together archaeological and historical information, including from Chinese sources, Dr Tai will explore the relationship between the orang laut, the Melaka Sultanate, as well as Ming China.

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    Source: Singapore Bicentennial

    In this talk, Professor John Miksic introduces 14th century Singapore. This presentation aims to arouse curiosity and questions about Singapore’s history by providing an overview of early Singapore’s connections with the region and beyond. Get a keen sense of the broad political, economic and socio-cultural trends in 14th century Singapore through archaeological sources and historical texts. Professor Miksic will also explore climatic episodes such as the medieval climate anomaly and its impacts on 14th century Singapore.

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    Source: SOAS University

    Museums are widely understood to have the power of representation. They shape identities and tell histories, distinguishing peoples and cultures through objects. Museums in Mindanao circa 2008 exhibit artifacts in traditional showcases. They select and display material objects that represent traditionality. Textual panels and labels accompany objects, establishing not only connections among the objects but also their historical significance. Physical space is arranged to provide viewers with a representational universe that assert local identities rather than tell the grand narrative of the nation-state. Instead of advancing a national ethos, Mindanao museums proudly bear the marks of their own cultural communities. This paper examines museums as sites of representations of a collectivity of identities. They are seen as places where object, image (photograph or drawing), and text are designed to work together to valorize indigenous and Islamized cultural communities. These include the Subanuns of the Zamboanga Peninsula; the Yakans of Basilan; the Tausugs and Samas of the Sulu Archipelago; the Maguindanaons, Blaans, and Tedurays of Cotabato; and the Maranaws of Lanao. Histories and identities are staged with a degree of intention through objects from the past, the past being conceived as a “deeply domestic realm.” On exhibition are household tools, agricultural implements, apparel and accoutrements, brassware and basketry, objects that mark ritual spaces, musical instruments, and war blades and spears whose form and function, story and sense, are presented through text in notes and labels. Framed within these objects are dominant design motifs that evoke the communities’ aspirations for peace and harmony. Research was done in six conflict-affected cities in Western Mindanao and the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao, which had 15 museums in total in 2008.

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    Source: SOAS University

    This paper will present a methodological overview and preliminary synthesis of multi-site ethnographic data on botanical practices related to indigenous textiles. Focusing on information derived from fieldwork among Bagobo and T’boli specialists in the late 20 th and early 21 st century, the paper will present indigenous textile practices related to plant use drawing on field and herbarium specimens with comparative information from other textileproducing groups in the region. The use of abaca (Musa textilis) thread alongside principal dye plants (Morinda citrifolia L. var bracteata and Diospyros nitida) create the characteristic textile patterns long associated with Mindanao material culture. The use of contemporary sources that extend plant-based repertoires will also be presented, along with the role of indigenous specialists and collaborators in multi-site research. In presenting both method and data patterning, this paper seeks to delineate how traditional botanical knowledge facilitates a range of contemporary aesthetic goals among Mindanao’s indigenous communities. In addition, this paper seeks to add to our understanding of how material culture, or the making of culturally meaningful things by historically marginalized peoples, continues to shape knowledge systems and organize individual and collective action.

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    Source: SOAS University

    Qur’an manuscripts from the Philippines are extremely rare, and until recently, none had been published. However, over the past decade, thanks to the increased access to finding aids through the internet, it has been possible to document about 15 Qur’an manuscripts from Mindanao located worldwide. 11 are presently held in U.S. institutions, almost all acquired in armed conflict during the American occupation of the Philippines in the first decade of the 20th century. Two are in Europe – one in Bristol University Library, and one in the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin – and about four are held in the Philippines. This paper will document and describe all known Qur’an manuscripts from Mindanao, and identify some characteristic features of the art of the Qur’an in Mindanao.

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    Source: SOAS University

    Many Spanish contemporaries viewed the partial conquest of the Philippines in the second half of the sixteenth century as a stepping stone towards gaining control over the lucrative spice trade, centred on the Spice Islands of Ternate and Tidore in modern-day Indonesia. Shortly after settling in the Visayas and Luzon, Spanish officials began to plan the territorial conquest of the southern archipelago; however, these ambitions died at the frontier with Mindanao and Jolo. For nearly a century, these polities beleaguered the Spanish with constant raiding, not only thwarting their expansionary ambitions but actively destabilising new Spanish settlements in the Visayas and Camarines. Despite Spanish attempts at subjugation by treaty, military invasion, and defensive armadas, their imperial ambitions in the region were repeatedly outmanoeuvred diplomatically and defeated militarily. This paper considers this conflict from the perspective of Southeast Asian polities in their defence against European expansionism, examining the dimensions of regional alliance building. In particular, I focus on the strong alliance built between Ternate and Maguindanao which shaped the early decades of the struggle against Spanish aggressive expansionism in the region. Having ejected the Portuguese from their territory in 1575, Ternate emerged as one of the strongest powers in maritime Southeast Asia. Over the ensuing decades, the Ternatens systematically built a network of tributary alliances across the archipelago, including with the Maguindanaos. They fortified the archipelago, amassed armaments, and imported new methods of warfare from Turkey and the Middle East. Ternaten military advancements were then introduced into Maguindanao, allowing them to successfully resist early Spanish attempts at military conquest and invasion. This alliance thus offers a new insight into the way in which polities in Mindanao resisted colonisation in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

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    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី២៨ ខែមិថុនា ឆ្នាំ២០១៩ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, Jun 28, 2019, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)

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    Source: Singapore Bicentennial

    Professor Derek Heng shares about early archaeology in 14th century Singapore at the launch the panel discussion with authors of Seven Hundred Years – Kwa Chong Guan, Derek Heng, Peter Borschberg and Tan Tai Yong.

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    Source: SOAS University

    This workshop examines the state of the field of the History of Art and Archaeology in a range of non-Western areas through the prism of publishing cultures. In each of the focus areas – Southeast Asia, China and the Middle East – disparate bodies of knowledge in European and local languages can be said to operate in parallel, enabling diverse types of knowledge to flourish while also limiting the sharing of data and the coalescence of thought. Hierarchies between these bodies are to some degree mobile, and can impact the establishment and perpetuation of authority on all sides. With joint support from the Southeast Asian Art Academic Programme (SAAAP) and the Department of History of Art and Archaeology (School of Arts) at SOAS, the workshop has a decolonising aim: to refine extant strategies for facilitating recognition of the many sites of knowledge production in the field, and for enhancing intra-regional as well as international dialogue. Publishing strategies which seek to foster collaboration and diversity at once, we posit, can open paths for ensuring standards of scholarship without privileging any one hegemonic voice. The core programme will comprise case studies from Southeast Asia pertaining to publishing cultures and patterns of knowledge production and dissemination in the ancient to pre-modern Southeast Asian Buddhist and Hindu Archaeological, Art Historical and Heritage fields. Other case studies will include reflections on similar issues in the fields of Chinese and Islamic art, along with presentations of ongoing institutional initiatives at SOAS and the Association for Asian Studies. Participants include Professors Ashley Thompson, Shane McCausland and Scott Redford (SOAS), Dr. Noel Hidalgo Tan (SPAFA, Bangkok), Dr. Heng Piphal (University of Hawai’i), Dr. Mulaika Hijjas (SOAS), Dr. Cristina Juan (SOAS), Dr. Krisna Uk (Association for Asian Studies), Siyonn Sophearith (Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts, Cambodia), Duyen Nguyen (SOAS, Danang Museum of Cham Sculpture, Pratu), Udomluck Hoontrakul (SOAS, Thammasat University, Pratu), Ivy Yi Yan Chan (SOAS), Pipad Krajaejun (SOAS, Thammasat University), Seng Sonetra (SOAS, Royal University of Fine Arts, Cambodia).

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    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    The history of Kuala Lumpur, literally translated as “muddy confluence”, began in the mid-19th century during the tin mining boom in the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. The mining industries transformed the area from a small settlement to become a state capital of Selangor and later as Malaysia’s most prominent city in the 20th century. This growth also brings the complexity of architecture, culture and heritage. However, rapid development, as well as economic prosperity, create a minor, if not major, “collision” between conservation values and the need for development. This presented a continuous challenge in the field of urban archaeology and heritage conservation in Kuala Lumpur and Malaysia generally, as reflected by few cases in the recent past. Hence, this talk will feature opportunities and challenges in archaeological works in Kuala Lumpur, as well as its future sustainability. It will also highlight a few examples and approaches to bring the local community together in conserving and preserving their heritage, especially in the urban setting.

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    Source: The Siam Society Under Royal Patronage

    In ‘The Kingdom of Cambodia’, we know very little about the development of Khmer musical instruments. The humid monsoon climate has destroyed all organic traces through the passing of the centuries. From the Pre-Angkorian period, we know about the name and shape of some of the lost musical instruments from three sources: archaeological objects, iconography, and epigraphy. The very first instrumental iconography found so far dates back to the 7th century. In the 9th century, written texts bring us the names of some instruments. In the 10th and 11th centuries, rare instruments are depicted on the walls of the temples. However, in 12th and early 13th centuries, we see iconographic representations of many musical instruments in all forms of Khmer activities such as martial, palatine, entertainment and worship. In the 16th century, Angkor Wat offers two frescoes and large bas-reliefs on which appear new instruments of exogenous origin.

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    Source: SOAS University

    Built by Yajñavarāha, a guru of King Jayavarman V (968-1001), and his family relatives, Banteay Srei is considered a “jewel” of Khmer architecture. The 10th century temple presents unique characteristics, starting from its “pink” color, its finely and meticulously sculpted reliefs and, most importantly, the narratives depicted on its lintels and pediments. Drawing mainly from the great Indian epics, the Rāmāyaṇa and the Mahābhārata, as well as from the Purāṇas, most of these narratives focus on the theme of “killing”. This paper aims, firstly, to explore how intricate play on language, art and ritual can be understood to have inspired this thematic choice; and, secondly, to explore the meaning of the Indic ‘killing’ theme in the Khmer socio-religious context of the time of the temple’s construction.

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    Source: SOAS University

    Bronze drums were produced and used within animist traditions, in a pre-Buddhist era almost three thousand years ago. Dong Son culture, bronze age, early civilization and sophisticated art production are concepts that most scholars within Southeast Asian archaeology and art history immediately think of when bronze drums enter the academic discussion. The drums have been, and still are, examined primarily as prehistoric artefacts or pieces of art and categorised according to established typologies. Archaeologists and art historians are looking into distribution patterns of the drums through which trade, exchange and cultural contacts can be traced, as well as production methods, techniques and iconography. Little attention has been given the fact that these artefacts constitute a living heritage, and that they are still being produced and used in various ways for different purposes all over Southeast Asia. In some contexts the drums are still parts of animist traditions, in others they have been incorporated into Buddhist traditions and religious practices, linked to cultural heritage politics, identity and nationalism. In this presentation, the transformation of bronze drums as heritage is examined through a case study from Vietnam, but also related to other examples from mainland Southeast Asia.

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    Source: TVUP

    CULTURAL HERITAGE Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Armand Salvador B. Mijares, PhD UP Scientist 1

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    Source: SOAS University

    Central Javanese temples are full of ornament: ornamental bands, garlands, kala heads, makaras, repeat patterns and spiral scroll ornaments, for instance. In this lecture I will present a chronology of Central Javanese temple ornament and show that an analysis of their forms and styles may contribute to solving questions of Central Javanese history and bringing clarity to the web of theories that have developed, for instance on the date of Borobudur, on the Hindu Loro Jonggrang temple complex and connections to the Buddhist Śailendras, on relationships between Hindu and Buddhist kings in general, on relationships between northern and southern Central Java, on fragmentation or centralization of the state and on connections with East Java, Sumatra and beyond.

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    Source: SOAS University

    Under various aspects, these three characters held major and well-defined positions in the religious and political landscape of various countries in insular and continental SE Asia between the 11th and 13th centuries, a situation which is also noted in the Nanzhao kingdom and the Yuan empire. Very specific lines of contacts can be drawn between specific regions of SE Asia and Bihar/Bengal and considering the SE Asian testimonies helps throwing a fresh look at the function of the images of these three deities in their homeland, Bihar/Bengal, where they could at a first glance appear not to be related to the political power.

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    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី២៥ ខែមករា ឆ្នាំ២០១៩ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, Jan 5, 2019, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)

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    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី៧ ខែធ្នូ ឆ្នាំ២០១៨ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, Dec 7, 2018, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)

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    Part 4

    Source: Alan Potkin

    Video archive with extensive textual, historical and interactive visual support, including navigable virtual reality panos, of the main image hall and larger temple compound at Vat Taleo Khao, in Savannakhet Province Lao PDR. The Temple compound was occupied during the 2nd Indochina War (~1963-1975) North Vietnamese regular troops infiltrating through the erstwhile Royal Kingdom of Lao on the “Ho Chi Minh Trail” and bombewd extensively by the US Air Force. While all the outbuildings and monuments were reduced to rubble, the primary structure received a direct hit from a 1,000 lb dumb bomb, which penetrated the roof but didn’t explode. The original compound was abandoned by the monks, who established a new temple 8 km away. The original building, still almost completely intact was never archived, although its architecture was extraordinary and its interior painting were devoted almost entire to the Vessantara Jataka stories (“Phavet” in Lao, “Wetandaye Zat” in Burmese), recounting the events of the last incarnation of the Buddha before his final rebirth as Prince Gautama.

    Link to video

    Source: ILHAM Gallery

    The Bujang Valley has seen the discovery of archaeological remains that are believed to be related to the port of Ancient Kedah. Historical accounts and archaeological discoveries show that the area functioned as a trading point as well as a centre for iron production from the 2nd to 14th Century C.E. A significant number of artefacts relevant to Hindu-Buddhist art were also found, such as sculptures, shrines and inscriptions. Issues regarding the cultural origin of those remains, and questions of whether or not they were commissioned and made locally remain ambiguous. This presentation by Dr. Nasha discusses the form and function of Hindu-Buddhist remains from Ancient Kedah, past opinions by scholars on their cultural origin, and present theories based on recent scholarship.

    Link to video

    Source: SOAS University

    Miscellaneous Assemblages: An overview of the Philippine collections in the Horniman Museum was given by Fiona Kerlogue at the Annual Philippine Studies Conference 2018 “Representing the Philippine Cordillera: Issues of Cultural Ownership, Commodification and Appropriation” which was held at SOAS University of London on 13 -14 July 2018.

    Link to video

    Source: SOAS University

    Kunthea Chohom is a philologist working on stone inscriptions from ancient Cambodia (which covers the present-day Cambodia, some parts of Thailand, Vietnam and Laos). Her research focuses on the development of Old Khmer language which was in close contact with Sanskrit from the 6th to the 14th century CE. She studies in particular the Sanskrit elements, in form of words and concepts, which were borrowed and adapted in the Old Khmer language as evidenced in the inscriptions. The purpose of the lecture is to discuss ancient education at Angkor which was closely related to Sanskrit language and Sanskritic culture. The education occurred within intellectual and religious frameworks that offered a variety of courses such as statecraft, philosophy, literature, astronomy-astrology, medicine, architecture and archery techniques. We will firstly review the role of āśrama which is usually translated into English as ‘hermitage’, beyond its organizational structure and governance. Next, ‘textbooks’ and teaching methods will be examined with special attention to the tradition of knowledge transmission (guru-śiṣya-paraṃparā) and knowledge of family (kulavidyā). Finally, we will explore how and to what extent the Hindu model of education with Sanskrit as its pillar was localized in ancient Cambodia starting with the medium of language. Main sources used for our study are inscriptions found in temples; sculptures and bas-reliefs as well as recent archeological findings. The inscribed texts, discovered in present-day Cambodia, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam are composed in Sanskrit and Khmer between the 6th and 14th centuries. Eulogistic, religious, philosophical and juridical passages of about seventy epigraphs are referenced in the study.

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី២៦ ខែតុលា ឆ្នាំ២០១៨ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, Oct 26, 2018, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)

    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3
    Part 4
    Part 5
    Part 6

    Source: ISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute

    Peter Borschberg, former Associate Fellow at NSC and Associate Professor at the History department of the National University of Singapore, delivered a seminar titled “Portuguese and Dutch Records for Singapore before 1819” on 9 October 2018 at ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute. This is part of the NALANDA-SRIWIJAYA CENTRE LECTURE SERIES ‘1819 and Before: Singapore’s Pasts’.

    Link to video

    Source: Department of Anthropology, CUHK

    Anthropology Friday Seminar, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. All Rights Reserved 2018. Prof. Louise Allison CORT, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution “Making Pots in Mainland Southeast Asia.”

    Link to video

    Source: ISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute

    NALANDA-SRIWIJAYA CENTRE LECTURE SERIES ‘1819 and Before: Singapore’s Pasts’

    Link to video

    Source: ISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute

    NALANDA-SRIWIJAYA CENTRE LECTURE SERIES ‘1819 and Before: Singapore’s Pasts’

    Link to video

    Source: SOAS University

    Chair: Ashley Thompson, Hiram W Woodward Chair in Southeast Asian Art, Department of the History of Art and Archaeology,

    SOAS Respondents:
    Conan Cheong, MA Candidate in the Department of History of Art and Archaeology, SOAS
    Penny Edwards, Associate Professor, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley Vasudha Narayanan, Distinguished Professor, Department of Religion, University of Florida

    Summary
    How does art serve to sustain cultural dynamics over centuries? How is it caught, transformed and carried by forces more powerful than any given work? What has driven the staying power of Indic gods in Southeast Asian contexts? Through close consideration of particular works of art and image types, along with the evolving architectural, textual and ritual contexts in which these are embedded, this workshop will examine the work of art in long-term historical processes. If Angkor is our point of departure and return, it repeatedly propels us beyond its apparent temporal and spatial limits.

    Ang Choulean, Professor of Religious Anthropology and Epigraphy at the Department of Archaeology, Royal University of Fine Arts, and Director of Yosothor Cultural Institute, Phnom Penh, is renowned for his profoundly insightful anthropological work uniquely grounded in – and shedding light on – Cambodian and broader regional historical, art historical and linguistic contexts. At SOAS he will present recent work on Yama, the God of Justice and the Afterlife, in a range of Cambodian cultural contexts. Archaeologist Eric Bourdonneau (EFEO, Siem Reap) will join Historian Grégory Mikaelian (CNRS, Paris) to present collaborative work on Angkor’s enigmatic devarāja, heretofore firmly evidenced only in textual form. In proposing formal sculptural identification for the devarāja both in the Angkorian period and in its long wake, the research gauges the modalities of an exceptional example of cultural continuity.

    Event sponsored by the SOAS Centre for Southeast Asian Studies with the generous support of the Southeast Asian Art Academic Programme, funded by the Alphawood Foundation.

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី៨ ខែមិថុនា ឆ្នាំ២០១៨ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, Jun2 8, 2018, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)

    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3
    Part 4

    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    This is lecture 1 out of 2 on the capital’s archaeology of Bangkok, Thailand, which is titled, ‘Archaeology in Bangkok’. The lecture was delivered by Dr Kannika Suteerattanapirom, archaeologist and assistant professor at the Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University in Bangkok, Thailand. Her ongoing research focuses on urban archaeology in Bangkok. She has undertaken numerous archaeological excavation projects in Bangkok.

    Link to video

    Source: SOAS University

    Step into a Burmese temple built between the late seventeenth and early nineteenth centuries and you are surrounded by a riot of color and imagery. The majority of the highly detailed wall paintings displays Buddhist biographical narratives, inspiring the devotees to follow the Buddha’s teachings. Alexandra Green goes one step further to consider the temples and their contents as a whole, arguing that the wall paintings mediate the relationship between the architecture and the main Buddha statues in the temples. This forges a unified space for the devotees to interact with the Buddha and his community, with the aim of transforming the devotees’ current and future lives. These temples were a cohesively articulated and represented Burmese Buddhist world to which the devotees belonged. Green’s visits to more than 160 sites with identifiable subject matter form the basis of this richly illustrated volume, which draws upon art historical, anthropological, and religious studies methodologies to analyze the wall paintings and elucidate the contemporary religious, political, and social concepts that drove the creation of this lively art form.

    Link to video

    Source: SOAS University

    The expansion of archaeological work in mainland Southeast Asia over recent decades has nurtured increasingly refined understandings of the emergence of politico-cultural entities in their interactions across the broader Southeast, East and South Asian region.  Growing intellectual attention to interpretive frameworks has, likewise, contributed to critiques of the colonialist and nationalist dimensions of much extant work on early Southeast Asian polities, making way for new explorations of networks, shared practices and objectives, as well as competing claims to territorial, political and cultural hegemony – then and now. This research workshop highlights work by two Southeast Asian archaeologists making incisive contributions to this field.

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី២៣ ខែមិនា ឆ្នាំ២០១៨ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, March 23, 2017, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)

    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3
    Part 4

    Source: John Hope Franklin Center at Duke University

    The Mekong River is Southeast Asia’s longest drainage system, originating in China’s Qinghai Province near the Tibetan border and wending its way southward through Laos, Thailand, and Cambodia and Vietnam to empty its nine ‘mouths’ into the South China Sea. More than 60 million people today rely on the Mekong River to support farming, fishing, and other livelihoods. The Mekong is the region’s rice bowl and a biodiversity hotspot; it is also a contested space whose existence is now threatened by both human and natural forces. A complex web of international agreements and a full-functioning multi-country Mekong River Commission have not prevented the construction of six hydroelectric dams in China, with more than ten major dams in the planning stages for Laos and Cambodia, and dozens more on its tributaries. These dams and increasingly unpredictable rainfall have already impacted Mekong River communities downstream, and the future promises to be even bleaker. What was life like before the dams? How did the Mekong River ecology shape the everyday life of its communities in the premodern world? Archaeological research in Cambodia offers insights on major turning points in human-river relationships with the Mekong: the Pre-Angkorian and Angkorian worlds.

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី១២ ខែមករា ឆ្នាំ២០១៨ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, January 12, 2017, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)

    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3
    Part 4

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី២៤ ខែវិច្ចកា ឆ្នាំ២០១៧ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, November 24, 2017, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)

    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3
    Part 4

    Source: Sirindthorn Anthropology Center

    ชุดโครงการวิจัยเมธีวิจัยอาวุโส สกว. ศาสตราจารย์ ดร.เสมอชัย พูลสุวรรณ เรื่อง “พระพุทธศาสนาเถรวาทในบริบทวัฒนธรรมเอเชียอาคเนย์ (คริสต์ศตวรรษที่ 11-ปัจจุบัน)” ปีที่ 2 ได้จัดการประชุมวิชาการระดับชาติเรื่อง “เถรวาทในเอเชียอาคเนย์: ศิลปะ สถาปัตยกรรม และวัฒนธรรม | 2560” ภายใต้ความร่วมมือระหว่าง สำนักงานกองทุนสนับสนุนการวิจัย (สกว.) ศูนย์มานุษยวิทยาสิรินธร (องค์การมหาชน) คณะสังคมวิทยาและมานุษยวิทยา มหาวิทยาลัยธรรมศาสตร์ และคณะสถาปัตยกรรมศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยศิลปากร

    – พิธีเปิดสัมมนา
    กล่าวรายงาน โดย ศาสตราจารย์ ดร.เสมอชัย พูลสุวรรณ l หัวหน้าโครงการฯ
    กล่าวเปิด โดย นายพีรพน พิสณุพงศ์ l ผู้อำนวยการศูนย์มานุษยวิทยาสิรินธร (องค์การมหาชน)
    – ปาฐกถา “พระพุทธรูปโบราณจากถ้ำพระ จ.ราชบุรี กับเครือข่ายเถรวาทในเอเซียอาคเนย์ ช่วงต้นสหัสวรรษที่สองหลังคริสตกาล”
    โดย ศาสตราจารย์ ดร.เสมอชัย พูลสุวรรณ l หัวหน้าโครงการฯ

    เมื่อวันเสาร์ที่ 11 พฤศจิกายน พ.ศ.2560

    Link to video here

    Source: Sirindthorn Anthropology Center

    ชุดโครงการวิจัยเมธีวิจัยอาวุโส สกว. ศาสตราจารย์ ดร.เสมอชัย พูลสุวรรณ เรื่อง “พระพุทธศาสนาเถรวาทในบริบทวัฒนธรรมเอเชียอาคเนย์ (คริสต์ศตวรรษที่ 11-ปัจจุบัน)” ปีที่ 2 ได้จัดการประชุมวิชาการระดับชาติเรื่อง “เถรวาทในเอเชียอาคเนย์: ศิลปะ สถาปัตยกรรม และวัฒนธรรม | 2560” ภายใต้ความร่วมมือระหว่าง สำนักงานกองทุนสนับสนุนการวิจัย (สกว.) ศูนย์มานุษยวิทยาสิรินธร (องค์การมหาชน) คณะสังคมวิทยาและมานุษยวิทยา มหาวิทยาลัยธรรมศาสตร์ และคณะสถาปัตยกรรมศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยศิลปากร

    นำเสนอบทความ หัวข้อ : Back to the future: the emergence of past and future Buddhas in Khmer Buddhism
    โดย Dr.Nicolas Revire l คณะศิลปศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยธรรมศาสตร์
    ผู้วิจารณ์ รองศาสตราจารย์ ดร.ศานติ ภักดีคำ l คณะมนุษยศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยศรีนครินทรวิโรฒ

    เมื่อวันเสาร์ที่ 11 พฤศจิกายน พ.ศ.2560

    Link to video here

    Source: Sirindthorn Anthropology Center

    ชุดโครงการวิจัยเมธีวิจัยอาวุโส สกว. ศาสตราจารย์ ดร.เสมอชัย พูลสุวรรณ เรื่อง “พระพุทธศาสนาเถรวาทในบริบทวัฒนธรรมเอเชียอาคเนย์ (คริสต์ศตวรรษที่ 11-ปัจจุบัน)” ปีที่ 2 ได้จัดการประชุมวิชาการระดับชาติเรื่อง “เถรวาทในเอเชียอาคเนย์: ศิลปะ สถาปัตยกรรม และวัฒนธรรม | 2560” ภายใต้ความร่วมมือระหว่าง สำนักงานกองทุนสนับสนุนการวิจัย (สกว.) ศูนย์มานุษยวิทยาสิรินธร (องค์การมหาชน) คณะสังคมวิทยาและมานุษยวิทยา มหาวิทยาลัยธรรมศาสตร์ และคณะสถาปัตยกรรมศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยศิลปากร

    นำเสนอบทความ หัวข้อ : แบบแผนและพัฒนาการทางสถาปัตยกรรมของพระอุโบสถและพระวิหารในเมืองพระตะบอง
    โดย อิสรชัย บูรณะอรรจน์ l นักศึกษาปริญญาเอก คณะสถาปัตยกรรมศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยศิลปากร
    ผู้วิจารณ์ ผู้ช่วยศาสตราจารย์ ดร.กังวล ดัชชิมา

    เมื่อวันเสาร์ที่ 11 พฤศจิกายน พ.ศ.2560

    Link to video here

    Source: Sirindthorn Anthropology Center

    ชุดโครงการวิจัยเมธีวิจัยอาวุโส สกว. ศาสตราจารย์ ดร.เสมอชัย พูลสุวรรณ เรื่อง “พระพุทธศาสนาเถรวาทในบริบทวัฒนธรรมเอเชียอาคเนย์ (คริสต์ศตวรรษที่ 11-ปัจจุบัน)” ปีที่ 2 ได้จัดการประชุมวิชาการระดับชาติเรื่อง “เถรวาทในเอเชียอาคเนย์: ศิลปะ สถาปัตยกรรม และวัฒนธรรม | 2560” ภายใต้ความร่วมมือระหว่าง สำนักงานกองทุนสนับสนุนการวิจัย (สกว.) ศูนย์มานุษยวิทยาสิรินธร (องค์การมหาชน) คณะสังคมวิทยาและมานุษยวิทยา มหาวิทยาลัยธรรมศาสตร์ และคณะสถาปัตยกรรมศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยศิลปากร

    นำเสนอบทความ หัวข้อ : มรดกความทรงจำ “อยุธยา” แห่งลุ่มแม่น้ำอิระวดี ช่วงพุทธศตวรรษที่ 24: ศิลปะสถาปัตยกรรมและสภาพโบราณสถาน วัดมหาเต็งดอจี เมืองสะกายน์ เมียนมาร์
    โดย อาจารย์ ดร.เกรียงไกร เกิดศิริ l คณะสถาปัตยกรรมศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยศิลปากร
    ผู้วิจารณ์ ผู้ช่วยศาสตราจารย์ ดร.โชติมา จตุรวงศ์ l คณะสถาปัตยกรรมศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยศิลปากร

    เมื่อวันเสาร์ที่ 11 พฤศจิกายน พ.ศ.2560

    Link to video here

    Source: Sirindthorn Anthropology Center

    ชุดโครงการวิจัยเมธีวิจัยอาวุโส สกว. ศาสตราจารย์ ดร.เสมอชัย พูลสุวรรณ เรื่อง “พระพุทธศาสนาเถรวาทในบริบทวัฒนธรรมเอเชียอาคเนย์ (คริสต์ศตวรรษที่ 11-ปัจจุบัน)” ปีที่ 2 ได้จัดการประชุมวิชาการระดับชาติเรื่อง “เถรวาทในเอเชียอาคเนย์: ศิลปะ สถาปัตยกรรม และวัฒนธรรม | 2560” ภายใต้ความร่วมมือระหว่าง สำนักงานกองทุนสนับสนุนการวิจัย (สกว.) ศูนย์มานุษยวิทยาสิรินธร (องค์การมหาชน) คณะสังคมวิทยาและมานุษยวิทยา มหาวิทยาลัยธรรมศาสตร์ และคณะสถาปัตยกรรมศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยศิลปากร

    นำเสนอบทความ หัวข้อ : ตำนาน “พระแก้วผลึกหมอก”: การเปรียบเทียบความหมายในบริบทวัฒนธรรมสยาม บรู และลาว
    โดย ผู้ช่วยศาสตราจารย์ ดร.เกียรติศักดิ์ บังเพลิง l คณะมนุษยศาสตร์และสังคมศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัยมหาสารคาม
    ผู้วิจารณ์ รองศาสตราจารย์ ฉลอง สุนทราวาณิชย์ l คณะอักษรศาสตร์ จุฬาลงกรณ์มหาวิทยาลัย

    เมื่อวันเสาร์ที่ 11 พฤศจิกายน พ.ศ.2560

    Link to video here

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី២៩ ខែកញ្ញា ឆ្នាំ២០១៧ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, September 29, 2017, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)

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    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី៧ ខែកក្កដា ឆ្នាំ២០១៧ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, July 7, 2017, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)

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    Source: Earthwatch Institute

    The capital of the Angkorian empire, centered in the modern nation of Cambodia, was one of the largest preindustrial settlements in the world. What we call “Angkor” has been the focus of more than a century of historical and architectural research. Few scholars, however, have examined the lives of the people who built the temples, kept the shrines running, produced the food, and managed the water. Dr. Miriam Stark and Dr. Alison Carter will present on recent work by the Greater Angkor Project examining Angkorian habitation areas, specifically within the Angkor Wat temple enclosure. They will discuss their previous research at this site, and outline plans for the next phase of their research, which begins in May 2018 with the Earthwatch expedition Unearthing the Ancient Secrets of Angkor in Cambodia.

    Link to video

    Source: The Siam Society Under Royal Patronage

    Early European visitors placed Ayutthaya alongside China and India as the three great powers of Asia. 250 years ago, the city was destroyed, and its history has been neglected. This new book is the first English-language study of the full 400-plus years from Ayutthaya’s emergence in the 13th century until its fall in 1767. With a focus on themes of commerce, kingship, Buddhism, and war, the book draws on chronicles, memoirs, visitors’ accounts, laws, literary works, wat murals, landscape, language and recent scholarship. “With thorough research and examination, and exquisite articulation, the book will not be surpassed for years, perhaps decades to come” (Thongchai Winichakul).

    Link to video

    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    The first lecture of the event was given by Prof. Dr. I Wayan Ardika, Udayana University, on ‘Balinese Hinduism and Hindu Arts Forms’.

    Link to video

    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    The second lecture of the event was given by Dr. Wannasarn Noonsuk, SEAMEO SPAFA’s Senior Specialist in Visual Arts.

    Link to video

    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    Kalapa –Jayakarta – Batavia – Jacatra – Jakarta: An old city that never gets old The Archaeology of Jakarta contains many layers with thin period separations. In the geographical sphere of “greater area Jakarta”, its roots starts from the younger end of lithic periodization found along with Buni tradition pottery. The Buni area stretched along the north coast of west Java towards the interior to the south. This geographical sphere then became the oldest kingdom in the archipelago, Tarumanagara, an Indian-influenced Hindu Kingdom, and when people started to have things set in stone, literally. Overpowering ancient kingdoms came after another until the Europeans involvement peaked for the first time when Portuguese signed a treaty with Sunda (a Hindu Kingdom, ruler of Kalapa port) to defend their territory from Cirebon (an Islamic Kingdom in the east part of west java). Kalapa became a prized area that was being fight over until VOC, led by J.P Coen, burnt it down and built Batavia. Kalapa as one of the few main ports of Sunda, has been welcoming people (with or without their will) from different areas. The overflowing of multicultural influence through this port continues through when Batavia became capital of VOC, then for the Netherlands Indies. The area grew into what is now known as the greater area of Jakarta. Although this greater area is now delineated into three different provinces, the cultural span of the area is still the same.

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី១០ ខែមិនា ឆ្នាំ២០១៧ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, March 10, 2017, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)។

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    Source: Asia Society

    Stephen A. Murphy, curator for Southeast Asia at the Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM), Singapore, and curator-in-charge for the Tang Shipwreck Gallery at the ACM, tells the story of the discovery of the Belitung shipwreck and explores its precious cargo — now on display both in New York and Singapore. The exhibition Secrets of the Sea: A Tang Shipwreck and Early Trade in Asia is co-organized by Asia Society and the Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore.

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី៣០ ខែធ្នូ ឆ្នាំ២០១៧ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, December 30, 2017, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)។

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    Source: Department of Anthropology, CUHK

    One-Day Workshop with Prof. Miriam Stark Part II: Archaeology in Asia 考古學在亞洲 Content/theme: 1. Overview of Asian archaeology 2. Some Very Cool Discoveries that make Asian Archaeology interesting to study, such as human evolution, early pottery, ancient cities 3. Selected methodologies that Asian Archaeology has contributed to world archaeology 4. Some of Prof. Stark’s experiences in Asian archaeology 5. Why Cambodian archaeology is so wonderful?

    Link to video

    Source: Department of Anthropology, CUHK

    Cultural Heritage Talk Series 2016 Imagining Angkor: Politics, Myths, and Archaeology 想像吳哥:政治、神話與考古 Speaker: Prof. Miriam Stark Date: 14/10/2016 (Fri) Time: 4:00-6:00pm Venue: Lecture Theatre (L1), Institute of Chinese Studies, CUHK

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    សិលាចារឹកភាសាខ្មែរចាស់ជាងគេដែលសរេសរជាពាក្យកាព្យ ៖ ទិន្នន័យបានមកពីក្រាំងនិងសាស្រ្តាស្លឹករឹត
    The Oldest Verse Inscription in Khmer: New Evidence from Leporello and Palm-Leaf Manuscripts

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី៥ ខែសីហា ឆ្នាំ២០១៦ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, August 5, 2016, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)។

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    Source: Yosothor

    ទស្សនៈខ្មែរនៅសម័យបុរាណអំពីការថែទាំជួសជុលមរតក
    Conservation and restoration works Undertaken by the Ancient Khmers

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី៣ ខែមិថុនា ឆ្នាំ២០១៦ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, June 3, 2016, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)។

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    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    First keynote lecture presented by Assist. Prof. Saritpong Khunsong, Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University. Presented at the 2nd SEAMEO SPAFA International Conference on Southeast Asian Archaeology, held at the Amari Watergate Hotel in Bangkok, Thailand, 30 May – 2 June 2016.

    Link to video

    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    Second keynote lecture presented by Dr. Mahirta Archaeology Department, Universitas Gadjah Mada Presented at the 2nd SEAMEO SPAFA International Conference on Southeast Asian Archaeology, held at the Amari Watergate Hotel in Bangkok, Thailand, 30 May – 2 June 2016.

    Link to video

    Source: SOAS University

    This seminar titled “The political economy of engaging communities in cultural heritage in Java” was given by Dr Riwanto Tirtosudarmo (Indonesian Institute of Sciences) as part of the Centre of South East Asian Studies Seminar Series on 17 November 2015 at SOAS University of London. This paper exposes the danger of an impending crisis perceptible today in the management of three major cultural heritage sites in Java. It is based on fieldwork being conducted at Candi Borobudur in Central Java, at the former Majapahit capital of Trowulan in East Java, and at the former Islamic Sultanate in Banten-Lama in Banten. It will show how a new nexus of stakeholders, reflecting the intricate political economy of current cultural heritage management, threatens to destabilize both the sites and the communities living around them. This complex situation results from the present policy of decentralization that alters the balance of power in the governance of cultural heritage. A new management body is crucially needed that will set priorities for integrating the policy initiatives of different stakeholders and improving the economic wellbeing of the local communities. Engagement with local communities is key. The three selected sites show local communities being engaged at three very different levels as the result of the differing local involvement of state institutions and international organizations. The low level economic wellbeing of the population surrounding the sites strongly indicates that creating viable economic opportunities for them, and not endangering their daily practices, is key to achieving a successful long-term scenario for managing and protecting the cultural heritage.

    Link to video

    Source: Yenching Institute

    Presentation by Piphal Heng (PhD Candidate, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa), part of the Harvard-Yenching Institute roundtable on “Asian Archaeology: Recent Discoveries and Controversies” held on March 28, 2016 at Harvard University

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី២៥ ខែមិនា ឆ្នាំ២០១៦ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, March 25, 2016, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)។

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    Source: Brown University

    Dr. Chen Chanratana is the Founder/President of Kerdomnel Khmer (KDNK) Group, mainly focused on Cambodian culture preservation and protection through a culture-themed magazine called “Kerdomnel Khmer”. He received a post-graduate degree in Archaeology, Art history of Southeast Asia from University of Sorbonne Paris III in France (2011). Then, he worked as a professor of archaeology, Khmer arts history and history of Southeast Asia and social research at Faculty of Archeology, Royal University of Fine Arts, Cambodia (in 2004). He was also in charge (2009-2010) of multiple programs at Southeast Asia Television (SEATV), and continues to publish in KDNK magazine and to and colloborate with Khmer Film Foundation to produce culture-themed films and the Cultural Road Show (starting 2013).

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    ទិដ្ឋភាពបីនៃលោកតាឃ្លាំងមឿងនៅខេត្តពោធិសត្វ
    Les trois visages de Lok Ta Khleang Muang dans la province de Pursat

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី២៩ ខែមករា ឆ្នាំ២០១៦ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, January 29, 2016, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)។

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    Source: The Siam Society Under Royal Patronage

    In 1716, King August the Strong, King of Poland and Elector of Saxony, purchased a container with what was described as a couple of Chinese paintings. In reality the content were two illustrations of the funeral procession of King Phetracha of Siam in 1704, one drawn by a highly skilled Thai artist, the other by a Dutchman who had little knowledge of Thai ritual. On a scroll over 370 cm long, the Thai artist drew the procession of King Phetracha’s corpse from the palace to the cremation ground in December 1704. This is one of the earliest works of Siamese illustration with a secure date. It has not been seen for almost three centuries. And the drawing is exquisite. In this lecture, Professor Terwiel explains the ritual of the royal cremation, and draw attention to the contemporary artistic conventions.

    Link to video

    Source: SOAS University

    This seminar titled “The political economy of engaging communities in cultural heritage in Java” was given by Dr Riwanto Tirtosudarmo (Indonesian Institute of Sciences) as part of the Centre of South East Asian Studies Seminar Series on 17 November 2015 at SOAS University of London. This paper exposes the danger of an impending crisis perceptible today in the management of three major cultural heritage sites in Java. It is based on fieldwork being conducted at Candi Borobudur in Central Java, at the former Majapahit capital of Trowulan in East Java, and at the former Islamic Sultanate in Banten-Lama in Banten. It will show how a new nexus of stakeholders, reflecting the intricate political economy of current cultural heritage management, threatens to destabilize both the sites and the communities living around them. This complex situation results from the present policy of decentralization that alters the balance of power in the governance of cultural heritage. A new management body is crucially needed that will set priorities for integrating the policy initiatives of different stakeholders and improving the economic wellbeing of the local communities. Engagement with local communities is key. The three selected sites show local communities being engaged at three very different levels as the result of the differing local involvement of state institutions and international organizations. The low level economic wellbeing of the population surrounding the sites strongly indicates that creating viable economic opportunities for them, and not endangering their daily practices, is key to achieving a successful long-term scenario for managing and protecting the cultural heritage.

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី១៣ ខែវិច្ឆកា ឆ្នាំ២០១៥ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, November 13, 2015, 5:30pm at RUFA។

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    Source: TEDx Talks

    Noel talks about his discovery of a 900-year secret in the temple ruins of South-East Asia, which created waves in the archaeology community. Noel Hidalgo Tan’s unique background as a journalist along with his expertise in rock art archaeology enabled him to discover a 900-year secret in the temple ruins of South-East Asia, and created waves in the world and the archaeology community after he revealed them. As he says, “Such discoveries are what we live for and what drive us as archaeologists.”

    Link to video

    Source: Ideas Agent TV

    The earliest evidence of human occupation in Malaysia was found in Lenggong Valley, dated to as early as 1.83 million years ago. The research shows that early human of Malaysia were cognitive thinkers, where they were able to identify different raw materials for to produce wide range of stone tools for different purposes.

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី២៨ ខែសីហា ឆ្នាំ២០១៥ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, August 28, 2015, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)។

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    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    The Archaeology of Cheung Ek in Phnom Penh by Phon Kaseka of the Royal Academy of Cambodia. Cheung Ek in southwest Phnom Penh is more recently known as the Killing Fields, but has a longer history than – a circular earthwork and kilns found in archaeological contexts indicate that the site was a ceramics production site since the 7th century.

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី១០ ខែកក្កដា ឆ្នាំ២០១៥ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, July 10, 2015, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)។

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    Source: SOAS University

    Theravada traditions shaped ancient civilizations and continue to inform modern practices in many regions of Asia. In this lecture, Juliane Schober summarises recent initiatives in the study of Theravada civilizations that are centered on Steven Collins’ notion of a Pali Imaginaire and chart new academic inquiries through interdisciplinary and multi-sited scholarly collaborations.

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    អាស្រម៖ សីមាកំណត់វិសាលភាពអាណាចក្រអង្គរ
    Les āśrama d’Angkor : première borne sacrée de l’empire khmer

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី២២ ខែឧសភា ឆ្នាំ២០១៥ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, May 22, 2015, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)។

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    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី៦ ខែមីនា ឆ្នាំ២០១៥ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, March 6, 2015, 5:30pm at RUFA (more information)។

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    Source: ISEAS Archaeology Unit

    The Lamreh headland adjacent to the Krueng Raya bay in Aceh Besar regency, Aceh province of Indonesia, known locally as Ujong Batee Kapai or the Ship-rock headland is one of the most important early Islamic settlement sites in northern Sumatra. The headland, some 300 ha in extent and the site of an ancient harbour has recently proved to have been devastated by one, if not two, pre-modern tsunamis and is a mediaeval settlement marked by numerous Islamic grave markers. The Lamreh site may be related to the Lan-li or Lan-wu-li of mediaeval Chinese texts, and in all probability the Chola ‘Ilamuridesam’ of the 11th century Tanjore inscription. Attention to a sadly neglected burial ground at Lubhok was initiated by an Indonesian archaeological research team in 1996. The author was fortunate in being able to visit the headland site shortly after the Indonesian visit and discover an extensive cultural landscape which at that time was still largely intact. Two distinct types of grave marker, a small, plain proto-batu Aceh and a distinct so-called plang pleng tradition are to be found there. These grave markers and similar stones at three other contemporary coastal sites, Aru, Perlak and Samudera Pase, are seemingly of some importance in considering the legend of the arrival of Islam in the Sejarah Melayu and may help in understanding the arrival of Islam in the Aceh region. The occurrence of the plang pleng tombstones that are found only in a very limited geographical area, may reflect the presence of a South Asian trading organization that had links to Sri Lanka, to Ayudhaya and to Quanzhou in south China in the 14th and 15th centuries. The plang pleng burial tradition seemingly disappears with the rise of the new sultanate in the late 15th or early 16th centuries.

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    Source: ISEAS Archaeology Unit

    From the 9th to 15th century, the Khmer Empire ruled over a large area of Mainland Southeast Asia, which was bordered by China to the north; the Malay Peninsula to the south; the Mon state to the west; and Champa and Daiviet to the east. The empire’s capital was located in the Angkor area and consisted of a concentrated series of monumental structures. These included a large capital city complex which encompassed a 3×3 km area (now called Angkor Thom), and the state temple of Angkor Wat—the largest Hindu temple in the world to date. The Angkor complex also consisted of huge eastern and western water reservoirs, canal systems, hundreds of other smaller temples,as well as a road network from the Angkor capital to other provinces within its domain. In order to solidify control over this vast area, the rulers of Angkor constructed many roads that connected the Angkor capital to its former capitals as well as new conquered territories. There were two roads to the east and northeast of Angkor which connected to the former capital cities of Sambor Prei Kuk, Kok Ker, and Wat Phu. To the west and northwest, there were two roads that had connections to Phimai, Sdok Kak Thom, and probably Lopburi. The late 12th century Preah Khan temple inscription tells us that there are 121 rest houses and 102 hospitals located along these roads and provincial cities. The inscriptions also clearly mentioned 17 rest houses along the 245-km-road from Angkor to Phimai, which was considered the northwestern region. The Living Angkor Road Project (LARP), a Cambodian–Thai joint research project, has been conducting research along the said road since 2005. The team has already identified 32 ancient bridges, 385 water structures, 134 temples, 17 rest houses, 8 hospitals, a number of iron smelting sites, hundreds of stoneware ceramic kilns, and many habitation sites.

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    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី២ ខែមករា ឆ្នាំ២០១៥ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Friday, January 2, 2015, 5:30pm at RUFA។

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    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    Dr. Amara Srisuchat, is a Senior Expert in Art and Antiquity at the Office of National Museums, Fine Arts Department, Ministry of Culture Thailand. She earned her B.A. in Archaeology, M.A. and PhD in Sanskrit at the Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University; a Certificate in Conservation of Cultural Property at the National Research Laboratory of Cultural Property, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India; Certificate in Remote Sensing in Archaeology at Silpakporn University, Fine Arts Department; and Les Service Culturels de l’ Ambassade de France in Bangkok. She received a research fellowship from UNESCO for conducting research on ceramics in Japan and China in 1991. She had held positions in the Fine Arts Department and other institutions, and was Director of the National Museum, Bangkok in 2008 to 2010. She is a guest lecturer in archaeology, art, history and culture in several universities and institutes. She is author and editor of several books on these fields, including rock art.

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    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    Associate Professor Dr. Chedha Tingsanchali works at the Department of Art History, The Faculty of Archaeology in Silpakorn University, Thailand. Dr. Tingsanchali holds a BA in Art History and MA in Art History (from the Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University). Dr. Tingsanchali received his PhD in History of Art from the National Museum Institute in New Delhi, India. His subject of interest is in Indian and Southeast Asian Art.

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    Source: SEAMEO SPAFA

    Associate Professor Dr. Chedha Tingsanchali works at the Department of Art History, The Faculty of Archaeology in Silpakorn University, Thailand. Dr. Tingsanchali holds a BA in Art History and MA in Art History (from the Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University). Dr. Tingsanchali received his PhD in History of Art from the National Museum Institute in New Delhi, India. His subject of interest is in Indian and Southeast Asian Art.

    Link to video

    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃសុក្រ ទី២៥ ខែកក្កដា ឆ្នាំ២០១៤ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅសាលប្រជុំក្នុងមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យា នៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ Vendredi, 25 Juillet 2014, 17h30 à l’URBA។

    គេច្រើនតែយល់ថា នៅសម័យអាណានិគម ដែលពួកបារាំងសេសបង្កើតគំនិតថា ខែ្មរចុះឱនថយចាប់តាំងពីចុងសម័យអង្គរមកទល់ពេលដែលខ្លួនមកត្រួតត្រាកម្ពុជា ហើយថាខ្មែរខ្លួនឯងក៏យកគំនិតនោះមកនិយាយតៗគ្នាមកទៀតនៅស.វ.ទី២០។ តាមពិតទៅ កា់រយល់់ឃើញអំពីការចុះស្រុតនោះមានប្រវត្តិវែងឆ្ងាយជាងនេះ ត្បិតខ្មែរគិតដូច្នោះតាំងពីមុនពេលបារាំងសេសមកដល់ម៉្លេះ ហើយមើលទៅប្រហែលតាំងតែពីស.វ.ទី១៨និងទី១៩ គឺថានៅពេលដែលព្រឹត្តការណ៍បន្ទាយលង្វែករលំបាក់បែកក្លាយទៅជារឿងព្រេងយ៉ាងធំមួយ។ នៅជំនាន់នោះគេដឹងច្បាស់ណាស់ថា ស្ថានភាពនយោបាយក្នុងស្រទាប់ក្សត្រដុនដាបរកអ្វីប្រៀបគ្មាន។ គេតែងយកការដួលរលំនៃរាជធានីលង្វែកនៅចុងស.វ.ទី១៦មកជាមូលហេតុ មិនថាយោងតាមព្រះរាជពង្សាវតារ ឬតាមការនិទាននៃអ្នកស្រុកសាមញ្ញឡើយ។ បើនិយាយពីមុននោះទៅទៀត គេអាចស្រង់គំនិតអំពីការចុះស្រុតម្យ៉ាងទៀត ដែលហាក់ដូចជាដក់ជាប់ក្នុងចិត្តខែ្មរ ហើយមានឥទ្ធិពលដ៏យូរអង្វែង។ រឿងនោះកើតឡើងដោយការដូរមកកាន់ព្រះពុទ្ធសាសនាថេរវាទ ត្បិតក្នុងទស្សនៈថ្មីនេះហើយ ដែលខ្មែរយល់ថាខ្លួនរស់នៅសម័យកាលចុងគេនៃប្រវត្តិមនុស្សជាតិ គឺថាសម័យវឹងស៊ុងដ៏ខ្មៅមួយហៅថា «កលិយុគ»។ ព្រះរាជានានាខំប្រឹងប្រែងកែទម្រង់ការគ្រប់គ្រងប្រទេស ដើម្បីរៀបចំទទួលព្រះស្រីអារ្យមេត្រីយ៍ ដែលនឹងនាំមកនូវយុគត្រចះត្រចង់មួយថ្មី។ ការកែទម្រង់ទាំងអម្បាលនោះធ្វើឡើង ដោយស្រង់គំនិតដូនតាពីព្រេងព្រឹទ្ធនៅសម័យអង្គរដ៏រុងរឿង។ ទំនៀមបុរាណជាមូលដ្ឋានធ្វើមិនឲ្យបច្ចុប្បន្នដុនដាប ហើយការពារមិនឲ្យភ័យព្រួយនឹងអនាគត។

    លទ្ធផលបញ្ច្រាសមកវិញក៏មានដែរ ព្រោះជំនឿអំពីការដុនដាបនេះត្រឡប់ជាជំរុញឲ្យមនុស្សមានកម្លាំងចិត្តប្រឹងប្រែងខំស្តារនិងស្ទួយជាតិក្នុងវិស័យវប្បធម៌និងនយោបាយច្រើនលើកច្រើនគ្រានៅកម្ពុជាសម័យក្រោយអង្គរ។ ហេតុនេះ និយាយតែរឿងស្រុតឱនថយម្យ៉ាងប៉ុណ្ណោះគឺមើលឃើញតែមួយជ្រុង ត្បិតមានផ្នែកដទៃច្រើនដែរ ដែលគួរឲ្យគិតថាជាការងើបឡើងវិញ។
    (សូមមើល ព័ត៌មានលម្អិតនិងប្លង់…)

    La thèse la plus répandue veut que ce soient les Français de l’époque coloniale qui aient fabriqué l’idée d’un déclin cambodgien, déclin qui se serait étendu de la fin de l’époque angkorienne à l’époque contemporaine. Selon cette conception des choses, l’idée de déclin aurait ensuite été reprise par les Cambodgiens au vingtième siècle. En réalité, l’histoire de cette idée de déclin est plus complexe qu’il n’y paraît car les Cambodgiens avaient eux-mêmes conçu le sentiment d’un déclin avant l’arrivée des Français, probablement aux XVIIIe et XIXe siècles, au moment où la chute de Longvek devint un mythe fondateur. A cette époque, le déclin politique de la royauté khmère est patent. On cherche à l’expliquer par la perte de cette grande capitale du XVIe siècle, un argument qui se retrouve aussi bien dans les Chroniques royales que dans les récits populaires. Mais plus tôt encore dans l’histoire, on repère une autre conception du déclin, plus profondément ancrée dans les mentalités, et qui va jouer un rôle politique durable : conséquence de la conversion au bouddhisme theravāda, les Cambodgiens pensent vivre les derniers temps de l’histoire humaine, un âge du chaos (kaliyug) dans lequel les rois khmers ont pour mission de réformer le royaume pour préparer la venue du Buddha du futur, Maitreya, annonciateur d’un nouvel âge d’or. Ces réformes ont pour inspiration les temps glorieux d’Angkor et la haute culture des Anciens, la Tradition servant alors de recours au désarois du présent, contre l’inquiétude que procure l’avenir. Cette croyance décliniste a été, paradoxalement, le moteur d’une renaissance culturelle et politique à plusieurs reprises dans l’histoire du Cambodge post-angkorien, de sorte que non seulement il n’est pas possible de la considérer, unilatéralement, comme une période de déclin, mais qu’encore, à bien des égards, elle devrait être considérée comme une époque de renaissances.

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Dutch Residents in Asia: Their homes and interiors, and their trade in works of art Date of recording: 15 July 2014 Speaker: Jan Veenendaal What furniture and works of art might you find in the home of a Dutch person living along the Tijgersgracht (Tiger canal) in Batavia in 1720? Jan Veenendaal attempts to answer that question. He will also discuss the kinds of art and furniture that the Dutch living in Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka during the colonial period brought home with them, focusing especially on some recently identified objects.

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    This talk examines the nature and legacy of Majapahit, one of Southeast Asia’s greatest kingdoms, existing between 1293 and 1527. Beginning with some of the latest developments in the archaelogy of Majapahit, Professor Vickers will then look at the different ways that Majapahit has remained important to Southeast Asian culture, particularly through the spread of the Panji stories (known as Inao in Thailand). He will also discuss the legacy of Majapahit in Bali, and the ways that Balinese culture in turn helps to understand Majapahit.

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Talk: Ancient Artefacts, Modern Worship, and the Origins of Buddhism in Northeast Thailand and Central Laos Date of recording: 13 June 2014 Speaker: Stephen A. Murphy, ACM Research Fellow For more info: http://www.acm.org.sg/exhibitions/921…

    Follow Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM): FaceBook – asiancivilisationsmuseum Twitter – acm_sg Instagram – acm_sg This talk traces the evidence for Buddhism in northeast Thailand and Central Laos from its earliest appearance in the 6th and 7th centuries to the local manifestations it exhibits today. The arrival of Buddhism introduced monumental architecture, stone and bronze sculpture, and a definable art style. While the archaeological evidence can tell us much about past Buddhist practices, it also provides a window onto modern belief and worship. Many ancient objects are re-used and repurposed in modern contexts, their antiquity apparently adding to their innate spiritual power. By looking at Buddhism past and present, this talk highlights not only the archaeological evidence for the spread of the religion into the region, but also the continual importance of these ancient objects to the local communities today.

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Date of recording: 11 June 2014 Speaker: Ebeltje Hartkamp Jonxis Follow Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM): FaceBook – asiancivilisationsmuseum Twitter – acm_sg Instagram – acm_sg In 1505, when the Portuguese encountered Sri Lanka, they came in contact with a rich and ancient material culture. They were particularly enchanted by ivory carvings. Realising the potential of these delicate treasures as diplomatic gifts, a monarch in Sri Lanka presented carved ivory caskets to Queen Catherine of Braganza in Lisbon. Soon, ivory caskets and small cabinets produced in Sri Lanka, by order of Portuguese traders, were in demand among European collectors. The Dutch, who ousted the Portuguese from Sri Lanka in the 1640s, likewise traded carved ivory cabinets to Europe. By early 18th century, the demand for Sri Lankan ivory carvings had dwindled in Europe, and the taste for exotics was changing.

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    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃពុធ ទី៤ ខែមិថុនា ឆ្នាំ២០១៤ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យានៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ(Wednesday, 4 June 2014, 5:30pm at RUFA)។

    បាឋកថានេះនឹងបង្ហាញអំពីទិន្នន័យថ្មីៗជាច្រើន ទាំងវត្ថុផ្សេងៗ ទាំងកាលបរិច្ឆេទ បន្ទាប់ពីការធ្វើកំណាយបន្តនៅស្ថានីយល្អាងស្ពាន ដោយក្រុមបេសកកម្មស្រាវជ្រាវបុរេប្រវត្តិសាស្រ្ត កម្ពុជា-បារាំង ពីឆ្នាំ២០០៩ដល់២០១៤ (សូមមើលព័ត៌មានលម្អិតនិងប្លង់…)។

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    Source: Penn Museum

    Join Dr. White, Director of the Ban Chiang Project at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, for a talk about current investigations of Southeast Asia’s rich cultural heritage and threats to its preservation. This event promises much food for thought, for scholars and non-scholars alike. Following an outline of trends in Asian archaeology and a more in-depth discussion of recent archaeology in Laos, Dr. White will share her personal experience with a US Justice Department case against smuggling of looted antiquities, one of the largest legal cases to date of this kind.

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    Source: Yosothor

    ថ្ងៃពុធ ទី២ ខែមេសា ឆ្នាំ២០១៤ ម៉ោង៥:៣០ល្ងាច នៅមហាវិទ្យាល័យបុរាណវិទ្យានៃសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ (Wednesday, 2 April 2014, 5:30pm at RUFA)។

    បាឋកថានេះនឹងបង្ហាញអំពីវត្ថុប្រើប្រាស់ប្រចាំថ្ងៃ ដែលតែងតែមានសោភ័ណភាពនៅក្នុងនោះស្រាប់ ប៉ុន្តែមរតកទាំងនោះត្រូវប្រឈមនឹងការបាត់បង់ដោយងាយ។ ក្នុងឱកាសនេះនឹងមានបង្ហាញជាឧទាហណ៍ខ្លះៗអំពីគ្រឿងរណ្តាប់, ឧបករណ៍ប្រើប្រាស់, សំណង់ក្នុងកិច្ចពិធីជាដើម ដែលភាគច្រើនជាប្រពៃណីអ្នកស្រុកធម្មតា។ (សូមមើលព័ត៌មានលម្អិតនិងប្លង់…)

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    Source: Yosothor

    ក្នុងសហការណ៍រវាងយសោធរនិងសាកលវិទ្យាល័យភូមិន្ទវិចិត្រសិល្បៈ យើងបានអញ្ជើញលោក Bertrand Porte (សាលាបារាំងចុងបូព៌ា) ធ្វើបទបង្ហាញមួយក្រោមចំណងជើងថា “ប្រវត្តិការជួសជុលបុរាណវត្ថុនៅសារមន្ទីរជាតិ” កាលពីថ្ងៃទី៥ កុម្ភៈ ២០១៤។ បាឋកថានេះធ្វើឡើងជាភាសាបារាំង ហើយមានរយៈពេលមួយម៉ោងកន្លះដោយរាប់បញ្ចូលទាំងការប្រែមកជាខ្មែរផង។

    For their very first joint conference on Wednesday 5 February 2014, Yosothor and the Royal University of Fine Arts welcomed Bertrand Porte (École Française d’Extrême-Orient), who gave a lecture on The Conservation-Restoration Workshop of the Phnom Penh National Museum. The lecture in French with Khmer translation lasted an hour and a half.

    Le 5 février 2014, Yosothor et l’Université Royale des Beaux-Arts ont conjointement accueilli pour leur toute première conférence Bertrand Porte (École Française d’Extrême-Orient) qui a fait une présentation sous le titre de : L’atelier de conservation-restauration du Musée national de Phnom-Penh. L’intervention en français et la traduction en khmer ont duré une heure et demie.

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    Source: ISEAS Archaeology Unit

    Temasek, renamed Singapore by Sri Tri Buana according to the “Sululatus’ Sulatin”(Malay Annals/Sejarah Melayu/SM), was an ancient pirate lair, but at the same time was a kingdom which exchanged ambassadors with China. O.W. Wolters, a renowned historian, concluded that the Singapore episode in the SM was a fiction concocted to conceal the subjugation of Palembang by Jambi. Archaeological research since 1984 has shown that the SM’s depiction of precolonial Singapore was not completely false. Singapore was not the first great Malay port, but for a period of 300 years, from 1300 to 1600, it was a prosperous settlement with local industries. Archaeology shows that Singapore had three roles in the 14th through 16th centuries: a regional centre of economic activity; a link between the Indian Ocean, the South China Sea, and the Java Sea; and a part of a larger empire. Temasek/Singapura successfully balanced these roles until 1600, when the island was almost completely abandoned. In “Singapore and the Silk Road of the Sea,” Dr John Miksic will tell this story, and also show how the revival of the ancient port in the 19th century was based on belief in the truthfulness of the SM.

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    Source: ISEAS Archaeology Unit

    Part of the book launch event organized by NUS Press “Singapore and the Silk Road of the Sea, 1300-1800.”

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Dr. Tansen Sen Associate Professor of Asian History and Religions, Baruch College, The City University of New York

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Dr. Rebecca Hall Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellowship in Asian Art, The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, Maryland Research Fellow at Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore in 2009

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    The Making of a Pilgrimage: Marking the Sites of the Buddha’s Life Dr. Frederick M. Asher Professor of Art History, University of Minnesota

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    Source: ISEAS Archaeology Unit

    Dr. John Miksic gives a general overview of how the study of ceramics in Southeast Asia can give insight into production techniques, technological advancements, trade, and culture. This lecture was given during the 2013 session of the NSC Archaeological Field School which took place in Singapore and Cambodia between 30th May – 17th June, 2013. The NSC Archaeological field school program is meant to contribute to an increased understanding of the ancient and intimate links that have connected Asian countries, to emphasize the history of intra-Asian interactions over the past 2,000 years, and create a community of East Asian Summit scholars. The funding for this field school is provided by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Singapore).

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    Source: ISEAS Archaeology Unit

    Following recent seismological and archaeological research, there is increasing evidence to suggest that the long-lost site of ancient Fansur, a toponym often associated with the Barus region, may be found in the geographically strategically located bay of Pancu, a short distance west of the modern city of Banda Aceh. For over a century, historians have spilled much ink relating to this toponym which appears in Arab, Armenian, Chinese and Malay sources. Writing in the early 18th century, the Dutch geographer Francois Valentijn located Fansur, the birthplace of Hamzah Fansuri the Sufi poet, in the furthest northwest corner of Aceh. An archaeological site discovered at Lambaroneujid in the bay of Pancu in the 1970’s lies precisely in this location. Further evidence suggests to this writer that Pancu, not Barus, was the location of the former harbour of Fansur from which Arab seafarers obtained their camphor known as kapur Fansuri. There is no doubt that camphor came from the hinterland of modern Barus, an area known to 11th century Tamils as Varocai. Fansur was thus, in all likelihood, an entrepot, not the direct source of the resin, even though historical sources suggest that Fansur was the point of origin. There are several such misrepresentations in ancient sources. Fansur is thought to have disappeared in the 14th century. There is increasing evidence that the disappearance of ancient Fansur was due to either a major earthquake or a tsunami or both. Recent scientific evidence suggests that a tsunami hit this northern coast of Aceh in 1390 CE. A further tsunami occurred some 60 years later, in or about 1450 CE. The Sultanate of Aceh arose in the late 15th or early 16th centuries. These events may be inter-connected. In the 17th century, a settlement on the shores of the bay of Pancu, immediately east of Aceh Head was known as Indrapurwa, a location now known as Lambaroneujid. The presentation will put forward the case for Pancu as the now-lost site of ancient Fansur.

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    Source: ISEAS Archaeology Unit

    Apart from an idyllic fishing village, what greeted Raffles, Farquhar and the early European pioneers when they landed in Singapore? Examining the few extant historical sources and clues from archaeological remains, this talk investigates what Singapore was like before and after Raffles’ arrival. This talk was given in association with the NLB exhibition entitled, “Raffles’ Letters: Intrigues behind the Founding of Singapore.”

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    Source: Center for Southeast Asian Studies University of Michigan

    Freer|Sackler Curator of Ceramics Louise Allison Cort has been named the 12th recipient of the Distinguished Research Lecture Award. This honor recognizes a scholar’s sustained achievement in research, longstanding investment in the Smithsonian, outstanding contribution to a field, and ability to communicate research to a non-specialist audience. In this instance, it celebrates how Cort has shared knowledge gained through scholarly research.

    Link to video

    Source: ISEAS Archaeology Unit

    During his tenure as lieutenant governor of Java and as governor of Bencoolen, Raffles contributed much to the study of ancient Southeast Asia. This talk focuses on Raffles’ career and his role in fostering the study of the past before archaeology existed, as well as on what we have learned about the British in Sumatra from excavations at York Fort in the 1980s. This talk was given in association with the NLB exhibition entitled, “Raffles’ Letters: Intrigues behind the Founding of Singapore.”

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    Source: KVHS1

    Dr Thomas Magnetti presents the program “Archaeology in Southeast Asia.” The presentation is an introduction to modern day archaeology and a discussion of the excavation of the village of Bon Non Wat, Thailand. This is a unique archaeological site since the village has been continuously occupied for over 6000 years, thus covering the stone age, bronze age, and iron age, all in one location. Over 26,000 artifacts have been found.

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    Source: ISEAS Archaeology Unit

    Rock art — paintings or carvings on rock, and other similar markings in the landscape — is not immediately associated with Southeast Asia. Because of its perceived rarity and obscurity, it remains one of the least understood archaeological phenomena in the region. Is there much rock art, if at all, in Southeast Asia? Where are they located? What can we learn from them? This presentation will first take us through a whirlwind tour of Southeast Asian rock art, looking at sites in every country of Southeast Asia, covering timespans from the remote prehistoric past to the more recent present. Through this quick survey we will get a sense of diversity the rock art of Southeast Asia has to offer, as well as some of the interesting questions brought up in the images depicted and the distribution of sites The talk will then move on to discuss some current research on rock art in Mainland Southeast Asia, particularly on the newly-discovered rock art in Cambodia and the confluence of sacred landscapes and rock art in Cambodia, Thailand and Laos, as well as the hidden paintings of Angkor Wat.

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    Source: Center for Southeast Asian Studies University of Michigan

    “Archaeology of WWII: White skeletal road in Khun Yuan District, Mae Hong Son Province, a Borderland between Thailand and Myanmar” Rasmi Shoocongdej, Silpakorn University and 2012 Fulbright Scholar, U of Illinois-Chicago 12/7/2012 Co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology

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    Source: ISEAS Archaeology Unit

    Dr. Leedom Lefferts and Louise Allison Cort (Curator, Asian Ceramics, Freer and Sackler Galleries, Smithsonian Institution) conducted an intensive study of the indigenous production of earthenware and stoneware pottery by surveying over 200 locations in mainland Southeast Asia (including Southern Yunnan, China, but excluding Myanmar (Burma). They preliminarily charted six types of earthenware and two types of stoneware production across the region and have presented and published over a dozen papers on the subject. This presentation summarizes their research findings and emphasizes three issues: the natureof the research as “ethno-archaeological method”; “embodied” behavior as indicative of cultural continuity and change, vis-à-vis pot form and decoration (and the difficulties associated with making archaeological discoveries in this domain); and the impact of these findings on the understandings of accepted Southeast Asian linguistic, political, and socio-organizational mapped boundaries. It is through their research findings that they propose a history of technological production behaviors that will begin to provide a nuanced understanding of contact and migration across the diverse landscape that is mainland Southeast Asia.

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    To Step on the Spread Cloth: Indian Trade Textiles and the Early Globalisation of Style John Guy Curator of South and Southeast Asian Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Presented at conference Patterns of Trade: Indian Textiles for Export, 1400-1900 Held on 21 April 2012 at the Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore (www.acm.org.sg) In conjunction with the exhibition Patterns of Trade: Indian Trade Textiles for Export, 1400-1900

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Phann Nady Research Team Leader, Underwater Cultural Heritage Section, General Department of Cultural Heritage, Cambodia Presented at conference Marine Archaeology in Southeast Asia: Innovation and Adaptation Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore (www.acm.org.sg) Held in conjunction with the exhibition, Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures and Monsoon Winds 18 June 2011

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    The Santa Cruz Shipwreck Excavation: A Reflection on the Practice of Underwater Archaeology in the Philippines Bobby C. Orillaneda Underwater Archaeology Section, National Museum of the Philippines Presented at conference Marine Archaeology in Southeast Asia: Innovation and Adaptation Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore (www.acm.org.sg) Held in conjunction with the exhibition, Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures and Monsoon Winds 18 June 2011

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Thailand and Three Decades of Safeguarding Underwater Cultural Heritage Erbprem Vatcharangkul Director, Underwater Archaeology Department, Fine Arts Department, Thailand Presented at conference Marine Archaeology in Southeast Asia: Innovation and Adaptation Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore (www.acm.org.sg) Held in conjunction with the exhibition, Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures and Monsoon Winds 18 June 2011

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures & Monsoon Winds Dr. Nancy Micklewright, Head of Research, Freer | Sackler Ms. Cheryl Sobas, Head of Exhibitions, Freer | Sackler Presented at conference Marine Archaeology in Southeast Asia: Innovation and Adaptation Held at the Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore (www.acm.org.sg) on 18 June 2011 In conjunction with the exhibition, Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures & Monsoon Winds

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures & Monsoon Winds Dr. Nancy Micklewright, Head of Research, Freer | Sackler Ms. Cheryl Sobas, Head of Exhibitions, Freer | Sackler Presented at conference Marine Archaeology in Southeast Asia: Innovation and Adaptation Held at the Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore (www.acm.org.sg) on 18 June 2011 In conjunction with the exhibition, Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures & Monsoon Winds

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Planning for the Future: Benefits in Building Local & Regional Capacities in Implementing Maritime & Underwater Cultural Heritage (MUCH) Programs Bill Jeffery Coordinator (Maritime Archaeology), Centre for International Heritage Activities Presented at conference Marine Archaeology in Southeast Asia: Innovation and Adaptation Held at the Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore (www.acm.org.sg) on 18 June 2011 In conjunction with the exhibition, Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures & Monsoon Winds

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    SEAMEO SPAFA’s Role in the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage in Southeast Asia Dr. Rujaya Abhakorn Director, SEAMEO SPAFA Presented at conference Marine Archaeology in Southeast Asia: Innovation and Adaptation Held at the Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore (www.acm.org.sg) on 18 June 2011 In conjunction with the exhibition, Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures & Monsoon Winds

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Commerce & Science on Deep-Sea Shipwrecks: A Marriage of Necessity Dr. Sean Kingsley Director, Wreck Watch International Presented at conference Marine Archaeology in Southeast Asia: Innovation and Adaptation Held at the Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore (www.acm.org.sg) on 18 June 2011 In conjunction with the exhibition, Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures & Monsoon Winds

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Trade Goods & Cultural Artifacts: The Odyssey Model Ellen C. Girth Odyssey Marine Exploration Presented at conference Marine Archaeology in Southeast Asia: Innovation and Adaptation Held at the Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore (www.acm.org.sg) on 18 June 2011 In conjunction with the exhibition, Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures & Monsoon Winds

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    Source: Asian Civilisations Museum

    Archaeology of Southeast Asian Ports Dr. John N. Miksic Head, Archaeology Unit, Nalanda-Sriwijaya Center, Institute of Southeast Asian Studies Associate Professor, Department of Southeast Asian Studies, National University of Singapore

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    Source: TEDx Talks

    Dr. John N. Miksic, a faculty member at the Southeast Asian Studies Programme at NUS, has spent most of the past 30 years doing archaeological research in Singapore. His research has seen him excavate sites from the backyard of the St. Andrew’s Cathedral in the bustling central district of Singapore to sites at the foundation of Angkor in Cambodia. At TEDxNUS 2010 he delves into the intrinsic link between history and memory. He showcases through a historic pelemsest how South-East Asia has been subject to a loss of it’s identity and memory. He regales us with the story of Singapore before Raffles’s discovery in 1819 and through myriad examples showcases the erosion of historic memory.

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    Source: James Cook University Singapore

    During the last ice age (20,000 years ago) it was possible to walk from Singapore to Borneo or Sumatra. Sea level was 120m lower than today, exposing the continent of ‘Sundaland’ (now island southeast Asia), with an area about the same size as Europe. Drier, open savannas covered the area around Kuala Lumpur and Palawan with moist tropical forest area contracting substantially toward the equator. In contrast, 6,000 years ago, sea level in Singapore was about 2.5m higher than now and the island shrunk to half its present size. The high-rise buildings of downtown Singapore are built upon the thick deposits of marine mud were laid down at this time. The modern patterns of biodiversity in the region have been shaped by these massive changes in the configuration of land and sea and by the large changes in climate and vegetation that have occurred in the region in the past. This talk will provide an introduction to environmental change in island southeast Asia since the last ice age and explain how sea-level and climate change have helped shape the modern biogeography of the region. It will also examine the potential role of environmental change in modulating the trajectory and timing of early human dispersal through ‘Sundaland’ and on into Australia.

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    Source: Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art

    Ian Glover, emeritus reader in Southeast Asian archaeology at University College, London, addresses the enduring challenge of connecting the late prehistoric and early historic cultures of Southeast Asia.

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