UNESCO offers help on quake-hit heritage sites

31 May 2006 (Antara News)

UNESCO offers help on quake-hit heritage sites

UNESCO, the UN’s culture and science organisation, offered Tuesday to help assess and repair damage caused to World Heritage Sites in Indonesia by an earthquake that left nearly 6,000 dead.

The island of Java is home to three of the seven UNSECO heritage sites located in Indonesia.


Related Books
Some architectural design principles of temples in Java: A study through the buildings projection on the reliefs of Borobudur Temple by P. Atmadi

Caves of Malaysia

Caves of Malaysia is run by Liz Price, a speleologist and is a great resource to the caves in Malaysia, not just for archaeology but for geological, floral and faunal value too.

I came across this site while cross-referencing web sources for the defaced cave art post uploaded a few days ago. Caves of Malaysia is run by Liz Price, a speleologist and is a great resource to the caves in Malaysia, not just for archaeology but for geological, floral and faunal value too. It’s added on the permanent links collection.

Caves of Malaysia, by Liz Price
Caves of Malaysia, by Liz Price

Placing right value on our heritage

I must say it is to Malaysia’s credit that they are planning to set up a heritage register for their country. Oh why are the other countries so slow!

29 May 2006 (New Straits Times) – I must say it is to Malaysia’s credit that they are planning to set up a heritage register for their country. Oh why are the other countries so slow!

Placing right value on our heritage

Under the Act, sweeping changes will be introduced.

Besides recognising intangible items as having heritage value, it will also see a master list of heritage items and sites created.

A Department of National Heritage has been set up and a commissioner appointed…

She is Prof Datuk Dr Zuraina Majid from Universiti Sains Malaysia. She is an expert in archaeology.

Quake takes toll on historical sites

28 May 2006 (Jakarta Post)

Quake takes toll on historical sites

Archaeologists surveying the Prambanan Temple complex in Yogyakarta hours after Saturday’s devastating earthquake found extensive damage to the ancient site.

Stone blocks and statues lay scattered about the ground; decades of patient restoration work undone in less than a minute.

“Our initial survey of the site found wreckage at the Siwa, Wisnu and Brahma temples, as well as at several minor temples,” Yogyakarta Archaeological Conservation Agency head Agus Waluyo told The Jakarta Post on Saturday.


Related Books
Some architectural design principles of temples in Java: A study through the buildings projection on the reliefs of Borobudur Temple by P. Atmadi

Prehistoric drawings risk being lost

27 May 2006 (The Star)

Prehistoric drawings risk being lost

Prehistoric drawings and inscriptions in more than 15 caves might be defaced due to lack of efforts to protect them, said National Museum archaeologist Sanim Ahmad.

He said the prehistoric drawings found on the walls of the Tambun Cave near Ipoh were so badly-damaged or smeared by graffiti that they were hardly-visible now.

Hanoi’s ancient citadel unearthed during car park construction

The citadel was uncovered in 2003 but some work has already advanced in setting concrete in the area.

27 May 2006 (Thanh Nien Daily) – Not so breaking news after all. The citadel was uncovered in 2003 but some work has already advanced in setting concrete in the area.

Hanoi’s ancient citadel unearthed during car park construction

The project management unit in charge of building the new parliament house decided this week to halt construction of a new car park after unwittingly uncovering remnants of Hanoi’s 1000-year-old citadel.

After conducting a thorough archeological search of the site, researchers discovered layers of structures built on top of each other and millions of artifacts dating back to the 7th century that detailed long-lost history of the ancient capital.

Cirebon Sultanate bids to help research

26 May 2006 (Jakarta Post)

Sultanate bids to help research

The Cirebon Kasepuhan sultanate has urged the central government to allow scientists to study various treasures and historical artifacts, including those found on a 10th century wooden vessel that sunk in the waters off Cirebon.

Police seize long lost Islamic treasures of the Java Sea

22 May 2006 (The Telegraph) –

Police seize long lost Islamic treasures of the Java Sea

Unique historical treasures worth tens of millions of pounds were yesterday gathering dust in store rooms in Jakarta after being impounded by police.

The 250,000 pieces of Chinese ceramics and Arabic and Persian glassware were recovered from a 1,000-year-old wreck in the Java Sea off Indonesia. Found with them were 13,000 Indian pearls, jewellery, about 1,000 rubies and sapphires and several gold pieces.


Related Books
Shipwrecks and Sunken Treasure in Southeast Asia by T. Wells

Cradle of the ancient Viet civilisation

Vietnamese archaeologists find more evidence of a pre-Dong Son culture.

21 May 2006 (Viet Nam News) – Vietnamese archaeologists find more evidence of a pre-Dong Son culture.

Cradle of the ancient Viet civilisation

Archaeologists believe that excavations of Den Citadel, said to date back more than 3,000 years, will provide evidence to support their theory about the evolution of the Van Lang kingdom.

Archaeologists have found bronze arrows, javelins, needles, earings, fishing hooks, and axes from the Dong Dau era as well as an ancient bronze kiln that was made of sandstone and terracotta with many tools. Artifacts found after four excavations have led archaeologists to the conclusion that the Den Citadel was a bronze tools production factory in the continental Southeast Asia. At this site, the number of relics found on 1sq.m is higher than in any other pre-historic excavation site in Viet Nam.


Related Books
The Archaeology of Mainland Southeast Asia: From 10,000 B.C. to the Fall of Angkor by C. Higham
Southeast Asia: From Prehistory to History by I. Glover
The Bronze Age of Southeast Asia (Cambridge World Archaeology) by C. Higham

The origins of Asian rice

A study tracing the origins of Asian wild rice and rice cultivation has determined that rice was likely to be domesticated in East India-Myanmar-Thailand (Orzya sativa indica) and Southeren China (Orzya sativa japonica).

9 June 2006 (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America) – A study tracing the origins of Asian wild rice and rice cultivation has determined that rice was likely to be domesticated in East India-Myanmar-Thailand (Orzya sativa indica) and Southeren China (Orzya sativa japonica). Abstract is cited here, full text requires subscription.

Phylogeography of Asian wild rice, Oryza rufipogon, reveals multiple independent domestications of cultivated rice, Oryza sativa
Jason P. Londo, Yu-Chung Chiang, Kuo-Hsiang Hung, Tzen-Yuh Chiang, and Barbara A. Schaal

Cultivated rice, Oryza sativa L., represents the world’s most important staple food crop, feeding more than half of the human population. Despite this essential role in world agriculture, the history of cultivated rice’s domestication from its wild ancestor, Oryza rufipogon, remains unclear. In this study, DNA sequence variation in three gene regions is examined in a phylogeographic approach to investigate the domestication of cultivated rice. Results indicate that India and Indochina may represent the ancestral center of diversity for O. rufipogon. Additionally, the data suggest that cultivated rice was domesticated at least twice from different O. rufipogon populations and that the products of these two independent domestication events are the two major rice varieties, Oryza sativa indica and Oryza sativa japonica. Based on this geographical analysis, O. sativa indica was domesticated within a region south of the Himalaya mountain range, likely eastern India, Myanmar, and Thailand, whereas O. sativa japonica was domesticated from wild rice in southern China.