Red list to flag smuggled Cambodian artefacts

The International Council of Museums will soon publish a Red List to help identify antiquities that have been smuggled out of Cambodia. This list will help some ways to stem the trade of antiquities from the plundered country, but more effort is still needed, especially when Thailand and Singapore are key transit points for these antiquities and the two countries are not signatories to the 1970 UN resolution on trafficking antiquities.

Phnom Penh Post, 27 June 2008

New weapon to fight theft of Khmer relics
Phnom Penh Post, 27 June 2008
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Thai court orders injunction on Preah Vihear World Heritage listing

More drama over Preah Vihear unfolded over the weekend after Thailand’s World Heritage Committee first announced its intention to co-host the bid to list the disputed temple with Cambodia. Thai nationalists succeeded in convincing the Thai Administrative Court to issue an injunction against the Thai side of the hosting, alleging that Bangkok’s support for the listing is exchanged for business concessions in Cambodia. This injunction will mostly likely delay the submission of the proposal to list Preah Vihear as a World Heritage Site.

Thailand to co-host bid to get Preah Vihear listed by Unesco
Bangkok Post, 28 June 2008

Thai court blocks support for Cambodia temple bid
Reuters, via Asiaone, 28 June 2008

Court issues injunction in temple row
Bangkok Post, 29 June 2008
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Wednesday Rojak #32

I know I’ve missed two weeks of rojak, and that’s because I’ve been struggling with access to the internet in my new home in Penang! But without much further ado, here’s this week’s salad of archaeological stuff culled from the web:

Angkor Thom
photo credit: 太鼓

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The Steep Stairway to Heaven

While much ink has been spilled these days over the border dispute between Thailand and Cambodia over the land surrounding the mountain temple and its application for world heritage status, relatively little has been written about the temple itself. This refreshing article describes Prasat Khao Phra Viharn or Preah Vihear in greater detail.

Khao Phra Viharn: The Steep Stairway to Heaven
e-Travel Blackboard, 20 June 2008
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Thai Srivijaya to be a World Heritage Site?

May thanks to Andy for the heads up. The Thai Fine Arts Department is hoping to propose three new sites in Thailand: Lanna, a section of the Chao Phraya river in Bangkok and the Srivijaya ruins in Southern Thailand.

Slanted Roof
photo credit: The Wandering Angel

Anusorn pushes for listing of Thai sites
Bangkok Post, 17 June 2008
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Old Bangkok as part of World Heritage?

Taking the cue from Laos’ Luang Prabang, the governor of Bangkok wants to propose Rattanakosin, the royal and old city of Bangkok, to be listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Wat Pho
photo credit: alex-s

Apirak wants Unesco to list Rattanakosin
Bangkok Post
Link is no longer available
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Preah Vihear on Radio Australia

Radio Australia publishes an interview with Thai (and Cambodian?) archaeologists about the ongoing dispute over the Preah Vihear temple. The podcast is also available for download.

Dispute holds up UNESCO temple listing
Radio Australia, 13 June 2008
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Call for Papers: Continuity and Change: (Re)conceptualising Power in Southeast Asia

‘Continuity and Change: (Re)conceptualising Power in Southeast Asia’

March 26th-28th 2009
Hosted by CRASSH (Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities),
University of Cambridge, UK

Keynote Speakers:
James Scott (Sterling Professor of Political Science and Professor of Anthropology, Yale University)
Shelly Errington (Professor of Anthropology, UC Santa Cruz)

The study of power in contemporary Southeast Asia has never been more timely. Over the last half-century, the region has undergone innumerable far-reaching changes. It has witnessed the rise of postcolonial nation-states, rapid industrialization, economic growth and democratization but also genocide, political upheaval and widespread repression. Power lies at the core of these important developments, whether in the form of brute military force or as a more capillary ‘disciplinary’ influence on religious and political subjectivities. New religious, economic and political movements—all drawing deeply on local traditions while proposing new forms of personhood, civil and political society—cut across national, cultural, ideological and sectarian boundaries.
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