Bodies of second world war sailors in Java sea ‘dumped in mass grave’

via the Guardian, 22 January 2018:

The Royal Navy heavy cruiser HMS Exeter sank after the Battle of the Java Sea in 1942. Photograph: US Navy Naval History and Heritage Command
The Royal Navy heavy cruiser HMS Exeter sank after the Battle of the Java Sea in 1942. Photograph: US Navy Naval History and Heritage Command

Illegal metal scavengers accused of disposing of remains from British and Dutch warships

Source: Bodies of second world war sailors in Java sea ‘dumped in mass grave’

Bodies of second world war sailors in Java sea ‘dumped in mass grave’

via The Guradian, 22 January 2018: The illegal salvage operations in Indonesian waters take a more sombre tone as reports emerge that human remains are being unceremoniously dumped. The second link below is worth taking a look at; it is a more in-depth investigation at the racket and the ships (mostly Chinese and Indonesian) involved.

Illegal metal scavengers accused of disposing of remains from British and Dutch warships

Source: Bodies of second world war sailors in Java sea ‘dumped in mass grave’

See also:

The race to save up to 50 shipwrecks from looters in Southeast Asia

via The Conversation, 16 November 2017:

More than 48 shipwrecks have been illicitly salvaged – and the figure may be much higher. Museums can play a key role in the protection of these wrecks, alongside strategic recovery and legislative steps.

Source: The race to save up to 50 shipwrecks from looters in Southeast Asia

Massive grave robbing in Southeast Asian seas

via The Guardian, 03 November 2017: 40 shipwrecks, mostly war graves, in Southeast Asian waters have been found to be illegally scavenged at unprecedented rates.

Dozens of warships believed to contain the remains of thousands of British, American, Australian, Dutch and Japanese servicemen from the second world war have been illegally ripped apart by salvage divers, the Guardian can reveal.

An analysis of ships discovered by wreck divers and naval historians has found that up to 40 second world war-era vessels have already been partially or completely destroyed. Their hulls might have contained the corpses of 4,500 crew.

Governments fear other unmarked graves are at risk of being desecrated. Hundreds more ships – mostly Japanese vessels that could contain the war graves of tens of thousands of crew killed during the war – remain on the seabed.

Source: The world’s biggest grave robbery: Asia’s disappearing WWII shipwrecks – The Guardian

Excavations of Burial Sites at Vietnamese Re-Education Camps by The Returning Casualty

And now, for archaeology of a more recent time. The Returning Casualty is a American-Vietnamese charity  whose work involves the excavation of camp cemeteries so the remains of the soldiers can be returned to their families after DNA testing. Julie Martin, who is studying for an MSc in Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology at Cranfield University in the UK shares her recent work with The Returning Casualty at a 2010 excavation in Yen Bai Province. [Text and photos by Julie Martin.]

Continue reading “Excavations of Burial Sites at Vietnamese Re-Education Camps by The Returning Casualty”