Kuala Lumpur’s heritage buildings under threat

via Straits Times, 08 August 2017:

SE Asia News -Misguided spending, poor maintenance and bad planning have left these icons in disrepair.. Read more at straitstimes.com.

Source: Kuala Lumpur’s heritage buildings under threat, SE Asia News & Top Stories – The Straits Times

200-year-old gravestones found in Kuala Lumpur

200-year-old gravestones were discovered near a historic mosque in Kuala Lumpur, during construction work that is part of a riverside beautification project.

Gravestones found in Masjid Jamek in Kuala Lumpur. Source: The Star: 20160413
Gravestones found in Masjid Jamek in Kuala Lumpur. Source: The Star: 20160413

Rock-solid proof of 200-year-old graves
The Star, 13 April 2016

Gravestones find ‘will not affect construction’
The Star, 04 May 2016

Contractors digging up the vicinity of the century-old Masjid Jamek in Kuala Lumpur for the River of Life (RoL) project stumbled upon several gravestones believed to be from the early 18th century.

So far more than 45 gravestones, mostly granite and a few marble as well as sandstone ones dating back almost 200 years were found buried near the construction site from December 2015 to March this year.

It is learnt that the RoL project conservator had alerted workers who are currently constructing a water fountain at the site to be on the lookout for more artefacts to emerge.

The site where the project is taking shape was a Muslim cemetery two centuries ago.

Full story here and here.

Malay manuscripts on display at the National Library

‘Secrets of the Ancient Malay Manuscripts’ features some of the most significant Malay manuscripts in the world.

Source: New Straits Times 20140504
Source: New Straits Times 20140504

Legacy of the Malay manuscripts
New Straits Times, 04 May 2014
Continue reading “Malay manuscripts on display at the National Library”

At the World Rock-art course this week

I’ll be blogging sporadically this week, seeing how I’m at the University of Nottingham campus in KL for the World Rock-art course. It’s an intensive, 5-day course that started yesterday (Sunday) all the way to Thursday, covering theories and methodologies about rock art in all its forms – directly relevant to my field of study. In fact, the course will end with a field trip to Gua Tambun, my research site.

Paul Taçon, whom I met last year at a conference, is fronting most of the sessions for the week – he’s got a wealth of experience researching rock art in Australia. He’s in the news earlier this year for discovering a spectacular find of contact rock art in Arnhem Land in northern Australia; his colleague Sally May is also present for the course, and I’m looking forward to discussing the use of photoshop and other digital tools to enhance degraded rock paintings later on this week.

Last call for the World Rock Art course in KL

Just putting the word out for last-minute applicants to the World Rock Art course happening this November at the University of Nottingham in Kuala Lumpur. I’ve been told that there are a few more subsidised places for Malaysian applicants (accomodation not included), so if you’re interested please send Barry Lewis an email.

This five-day intensive course will see some of the world’s foremost authorities in rock art presenting an overview of this global phenomenon, research approaches, and also incorporate a field trip to Gua Tambun. Read the full details of the course here.

Rock Art course in KL: Subsidised rates for ASEAN students

Students interested in the rock art course conducted by the University of Nottingham @ KL might be interested in making use of the new subsidised rates for ASEAN members – actually, more than just ASEAN, see the full list here.

Gua Tambun, Malaysia
Continue reading “Rock Art course in KL: Subsidised rates for ASEAN students”