Committee for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict Grants Enhanced Protection to Angkor

via Unesco, 30 Nov 2017:

At the request of the Kingdom of Cambodia, the Committee for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict, meeting at UNESCO Headquarters, Paris from 29 to 30 November 2017, granted “enhanced protection” status to Angkor, a cultural World Heritage site. Enhanced protection is a mechanism established by the 1999 Second Protocol to the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict (“the 1954 Hague Convention”) aimed at ensuring full and effective protection of specifically designated cultural property during international or non-international armed conflicts. Angkor joins twelve other properties in Azerbaijan, Belgium, Cyprus, Georgia, Italy, Lithuania and Mali that benefit from high-level immunity and rigorous legal protection ensuring that they cannot be targeted, attacked or used for military purposes.

Source: Committee for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict Grants Enhanced Protection to Angkor

See Angkor Wat and Borobudur in Lego

via Channel NewsAsia, 27 July 2017: A new exhibition in Singapore features Lego versions of World Heritage Sites, including Southeast Asian ones like Angkor Wat, Borobudur and the Singapore Botanic Gardens.

Brick by brick: New Lego exhibition gathers together World Heritage Sites

Source: Brick by brick: New Lego exhibition gathers together World Heritage Sites – Channel NewsAsia

See also:

Floating bridge to Angkor Wat temple opens to foreign tourists

Today, 26 May 2017: The temporary floating causeway to Angkor Wat is officially open to tourists, while the main causeway is being restored over the next few years.

PHNOM PENH — A floating bridge opened for use by foreign tourists and local visitors at Cambodia’s famed Angkor Wat on Thursday (May 25), enabling them to reach the ancient temple while the original stone bridge undergoes renovation by Cambodian and Japanese experts.

Source: Floating bridge to Angkor Wat temple opens to foreign tourists | TODAYonline

Land of fabled temple | New Straits Times | Malaysia General Business Sports and Lifestyle News

New Straits Times, 15 April 2017: A travel story on the many popular temple sites to visit in Angkor.

THREE decades of friendship! Now that’s something to celebrate. And to mark the milestone, my friend Mathini Raman and I decided to embark on an adventure together, one that we’ll never forget.

Source: Land of fabled temple | New Straits Times | Malaysia General Business Sports and Lifestyle News

The household archaeology of Angkor Wat

Dr Alison Carter’s article for the Khmer Times on her work on household archaeology at Angkor Wat.

Excavations at Angkor Wat. Source: Khmer Times 20160707
Excavations at Angkor Wat. Source: Khmer Times 20160707

Household Archaeology at Angkor Wat
Khmer Times, 07 July 2016

When you picture Angkor Wat, you might think of the imposing and elegant temple surrounded by a thick forest of trees. However, archaeologists now know that when Angkor Wat was built, it was surrounded by a series of mounds that are likely places where people lived.

Angkor Wat is just one temple in the Angkorian Empire, the heart of which covered an area of 1,000 square kilometers and may have contained a population of as many as 750,000 people. Investigating the question of where Angkorian people lived is one focus of the Greater Angkor Project (GAP), a collaborative research program between the University of Sydney and the APSARA Authority, directed by Dr. Roland Fletcher.

One way to begin understanding the lives of the non-elite members of Angkor is by excavating their households. Through excavations of their living spaces, archaeologists can understand the daily practices of people in the past. This kind of work can also tell us more about the variation between different households, communities and settlements, as well as the differences between elites and non-elites. In this way, we can come to understand Angkorian society from the ground up.

Full story here.

Angkor Wat’s causeway renovation

Lost month a restoration project for the main causeway leading to Angkor Wat was launched. The project is led by Sophia University in Japan.

Angkor Wat Causeway. Source: Bangkok Post 20160509
Angkor Wat Causeway. Source: Bangkok Post 20160509

Cambodia, Japan restore Angkor Wat causeway
Kyodo News, via Bangkok Post 09 May 2016

Japan Pledges $26m to Restore Angkor Wat Temples
VOA Khmer, 11 May 2016

Cambodia and Japan began Monday a four-year project to restore the ruined western causeway at Cambodia’s Angkor Wat temple.

Speaking at the launch of the Angkor Wat restoration project, Deputy Prime Minister Sok An said “today’s event reflects the robust spirit of international cooperation and solidarity in the protection, safeguarding and conservation of the heritage of humanity in accordance with the motto ‘heritage for all, all for heritage’.”

Sok An said Japan is playing a significant role in the process, providing financial and technical supports to Cambodia, especially for the conservation and restoration of Bayon Temple and causeway at Angkor Wat, which is the main gateway to the site.

Full stories here and here.

Road in front of Angkor Wat closed to traffic

The area in front of the entrance to Angkor Wat is now off limits to vehicular traffic in a bid to ease congestion.

Hun Sen Bans Traffic on Angkor Wat Road
Cambodia Daily, 4 May 2016

No cars allowed near Angkor Wat
AP, via Today, 3 May 2016

Cars, vans, and other vehicular traffic will be barred from traveling along the stretch of road directly facing Angkor Wat, the country’s most iconic tourist attraction, Prime Minister Hun Sen announced on Facebook yesterday.

“From now on, only pedestrians and cyclists will be allowed to enter the road in front of Angkor Wat temple. No any other vehicles will be allowed to pass through the street, but firetrucks and ambulances will be allowed to enter during an emergency,” Mr. Hun Sen wrote.

Full story here and here.