Wreck finds for sale

Liz Price covers the sale of excess finds from shipwrecks in Malaysian waters at the Aquaria in KLCC. Watch out for the podcast coming soon!

7 October 2006 (The Star)Liz Price covers the sale of excess finds from shipwrecks in Malaysian waters at the Aquaria in KLCC. Watch out for the podcast coming soon!

The Star, 7 Oct 2006

Wreck finds for sale

How would you like to be the owner of a 1,000-year-old piece of pottery recovered from the Malaysian seabed?

Thousands of such treasures are on sale in Kuala Lumpur in a month-long exhibition. Treasures of the South China Sea at Aquaria, KLCC shows pottery and ceramics recovered from 10 shipwrecks found in Malaysian waters, and all the pieces are up for sale. Rest assured that you are buying a genuine piece, as its origin and history are known.

Items include Ming dynasty celadon dishes, vases, Sukhothai fish plate, porcelain ewers, Qing dynasty blue and white dishes, brown glazed jars, covered boxes and jars, teapots, bowls and spoons. There are even 1,000-year-old bronze gongs.

Related Books:
Shipwrecks and Sunken Treasure in Southeast Asia by T. Wells
The Ceramics of Southeast Asia : Their Dating and Identification by R. M. Brown

Investigation On Sunken Ship Continues

3 October 2006 (Bernama)

Investigation On Sunken Ship Continues

The location and cause of the sinking of the ship Renee in Johor waters in 1923 is being investigated by the Archaeological Unit of the National Museum.

Unit curator Samsol Sahar, who headed the expedition that found the ship in October last year, said the research and excavation work to get more details on the sunken ship was ongoing.

The initial finding of the investigation was that the ship was on its way to send the dowry of a Pahang royal family member who was to marry a Perak royal family member when it sank, he told Bernama Tuesday.


Related Books:
Shipwrecks and Sunken Treasure in Southeast Asia by T. Wells

Dong Son drum found in central province

3 October 2006 (Vietnam Net Bridge)

Vietnam Net Bridge, 3 Oct 2006

Dong Son drum found in central province

A Dong Son bronze drum was just unearthed in the central province of Quang Ngai where indications of the Sa Huynh culture had been found.

. . .

But as all the pieces were still at the place where it was buried, the measurements of its diameter and it height show that it was 44cm in diameter and 28cm high. Patterns on the drum’s surface could still be seen clearly.

On its surface there are 12 stars with the centre point was cast emerging. Surrounding the stars are striped lines. There are for carvings of toads at the edge of the drum surface.

Ancient royal edicts face risk of loss

A report on stolen sac-phong, royal honour-conferring edicts that date from the 14th century and also their digitisation as a means to preserve them.

1 October 2006 (Viet Nam News) – A report on stolen sac-phong, royal honour-conferring edicts that date from the 14th century and also their digitisation as a means to preserve them.

Ancient royal edicts face risk of loss

Ancient sac phong are now still being kept under one of two conditions, according to their content. Sac phong chuc tuoc, the “human” edicts, which bestow titles upon noblemen and officials, or praise people who deserve well of the country, are normally the property of a family. The other kind, sac phong than, which certify and rank genies or patron saints worshipped in temples and communal houses, are considered the common property of a village community, so they are kept in temples.

The oldest sac phong date back to the 15th century, and are still preserved in the communal house in Diem Dien Township, in the northern province of Thai Binh’s Thai Thuî District.

Sac phong were made from a special type of paper, called giay sac, which was used only for the kings to write their edicts. The method for making the paper was passed down through the generations of a family in the ancient Nghia Do Village, which is now Ha NoiTu Liem District. The paper was made from valuable material, with the imperial symbols of the dragon and phoenix drawn in gold, silver and metal grain.

. . .

Recently, a group of historians and experts including those from the Viet Nam History Association, the Viet Nam Museum of Ethnology, and the National Library have rallied to protect the ancient sac phong, under the initiative and funding of the Sweden-Viet Nam Cultural Fund.

Huu Ngoc, who is also president of the fund, says the project can be implemented in one of two ways.

“First, we can hire experts to physically strengthen the documents and find ways to preserve them.” But Ngoc explains that each document would take about 10 days to complete and cost VND100,000 ($US6.25) to preserve, making this option virtually impossible given the large number of sac phong that exist in Viet Nam.

The other option is to protect the words and decorations of sac phong by taking photographs with digital cameras. All of the images would be saved on disc with archival information detailing the names of the sac phong and where they are kept. All the discs would be listed as administrative units and kept at the National Library.

2,500 year-old jars unearthed

This is another set of 2,500-year-old burial jars, this time found at Hue City.

30 September 2006 (Viet Nam News) – This is another set of 2,500-year-old burial jars, this time found at Hue City.

2,500 year-old jars unearthed

HUE CITY — Archaeologists have just finished their three-week excavation to unearth 30 jar tombs from a resident’s garden in Hue City.

The ground is owned by Nguyen Cong Man, who discovered the objects while digging up dirt to plant trees one month ago. He informed city authorities who permitted the excavation project in Phu O Village, Huong Chu Commune of the city’s Huong Tra District.

Vietnam boasts archeological finds

1 October 2006 (Vietnam Net Bridge) – Unfortunately, they don’t say where the venue of the conference was or its name…

Vietnam Net Bridge, 1 Oct 2006

Vietnam boasts archeological finds

An archaeology conference with 100 scientists participating opened in Ha Noi on September 28 to present 456 scientific archeological reports on a slew of new finds in a range of different categories.

This year’s conference will present reports from various fields such as stone archaeology (from 12 excavations), metal archaeology (from eight excavations), historical archaeology (from 12 excavations) and Champa-Oc Eo archaeology (from five reports on several large excavations).


Related Books:
Art & Archaeology of Fu Nan by J. C. Khoo
The Art of Champa by J. Hubert

Ancient burial urns found in central Vietnam

29 September 2006 (Thanh Nien News)

Thanh Nien News, 29 Sep 2006

Ancient burial urns found in central Vietnam

Archaeologists have discovered 30 burial jars belonging to the 2,500-year-old Sa Huynh civilization in central Vietnam.

The graves together with many artifacts were unearthed at the Con Dai archaeological site in Thua Thua-Hue province’s Huong Tra district.

Apsara dancers of Angkor

23 September 2006 (The Star)

The Star, 23 Sep 2006
Apsara dancers of Angkor

I was surrounded by apsara everywhere I turned. They were on walls and pillars, lintels and window frames. An apsara has been variously described as a female divinity, a heavenly dancer and a celestial nymph. An apsara is skilled in dance and music, and said to be irresistible to men. Although they were all carved in stone, I observed that each apsara showed slightly different characteristics, either in facial expression, pose or costume and adornments. I was fascinated by the headdresses and trinkets worn by the dancers and noticed that they had ears stretched by heavy earrings. Elongated ear lobes remind one of Lord Buddha. All the apsaras were presented bare-breasted and they were generously endowed. I think some visitors have not been able to resist rubbing and touching the sculptures because certain parts of the anatomy of a few of these sculptures have been rubbed almost black. Fortunately such vandalism and disrespectful behaviour is not widespread.


Related Books:
Images of the Gods: Khmer Mythology in Cambodia, Laos & Thailand by V. Roveda
Narrative Sculpture and Literary Traditions in South and Southeast Asia (Studies in Asian Art and Archaeology) by J. Fontein and M. J. Klokke (Eds)
Apsarases at Angkor Wat, in Indian context by K. M. Srivastava

First private museum opens in Vietnam

First private museum showcasing artefacts from ancient Vietnam is opened.

21 September 2006 (Vietnam Net Bridge) – First private museum showcasing artefacts from ancient Vietnam is opened.

First private museum opens

The Hoang Long Artifacts Museum in the central province of Thanh Hoa is owned by Hoang Van Thong, who has zoned off 500 sq.m of his own land to establish the first ever private museum in Vietnam. The exhibits range from earthenware from the Dong Son culture in the Bronze Age (from 1000 to 1 BC) and farming tools, weapons, household utensils and personal decorations and antique ceramics from the Ly, Tran and Le dynasties from the late 10th century to the late 18th century.


Related Books:
Shipwrecks and Sunken Treasure in Southeast Asia by T. Wells