WESTERN AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM CATALOGUE OF PREVIOUSLY UNPUBLISHED DATA FROM THAI-AUSTRALIAN EXCAVATIONS IN THAILAND

via the Western Australian Museum: This report has been collated for the purpose of completing the record of artefacts recovered during excavations undertaken by joint Thai-Australian expeditions in the 1980s. This group represented the Thai Fine Arts Department Underwater Archaeology Division, Silapakorn University, the Thai Ceramic Archaeological Project, the Western Australian Museum, the Australian (now Australasian) Institute for Archaeology, the University of Adelaide, the Art Gallery of South Australia and on occasion, participants of the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMO), Special Project in Archaeology and Fine Arts (SPAFA). Participants represented Thailand, Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Canada, Poland and the United States of America. Included is information recorded by the author whilst participating in excavations of kiln sites at Si Satchanalai, Sukhothai Province and the Bang Rachan or Mae Nam Noi Kiln site, Singburi Province, Thailand during the 1980s. A brief visit was also made to the Ban Bang Pun Kiln site, Suphanburi. The author was also privileged to have been given access to the ceramic sherd collection of the National Museum of the Philippines, Manila and those of the regional museums of Butuan and Cebu cities.

Nan Museum ‘renovation’ comes under fire

via Bangkok Post, 17 Feb 2018:

After being closed for three years for renovations that cost 34.8 million baht, the Nan National Museum has recently reopened — only to be greeted with trenchant criticism over the outcome of the refurbishment.

Source: Museum ‘renovation’ comes under fire

Cambodia’s Genocide Museum Conserves Clothing of Khmer Rouge Victims

via VOA News, 09 February 2018:

Many of the more obvious artifacts of mass crimes, torture implements, shackles, documents, were immediately preserved in the genocide museum set up inside S-21 by the Vietnamese administrators who occupied Cambodia, but the clothes were largely ignored.

All were virtually untouched for 40 years. Many of the garments began to deteriorate due to the effects of climate and haphazard handling.

Now this is changing, as the garments’ value as evidence and cultural artifacts is being recognized. Beginning late last month, the Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum, which is administered by Cambodia’s Ministry of Culture, began a multi-year project to conserve 3,000 to 5,000 cloth artifacts, funded with a $55,000 grant from the U.S. government. For the first time, the clothes will be sorted, preserved, and, in some cases, displayed as part of the memorial to the 1.7 million Cambodians who died, about 25 percent of the population, during Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge regime between 1975-1979.

Source: Cambodia’s Genocide Museum Conserves Clothing of Khmer Rouge Victims | VOA News

Hanoi attempts to leverage museums, theatres for tourism development

via Viet Nam Net, 24 Jan 2018:

The move was carried out under the instruction of Minister of Culture, Sports and Tourism Nguyen Ngoc Thien on the implementation of plans to organise high-quality art programmes and develop cultural products to serve tourists.

The Vietnam National Administration of Tourism worked with the Vietnam National Museum of History, the Vietnam Fine Arts Museum, the Vietnam National Puppetry Theatre, the Centre for Research, Preservation and Promotion of Vietnamese Traditional Culture, and travel firms to build these tours.

Visitors had a chance to explore the Vietnam National Museum of History, visit Hanoi’s Old Quarter, an old house on Ma May, Bach Ma Temple and try some street food on January 18.

Hanoi attempts to leverage museums, theatres for tourism development

Ancient Angkorian jewellery to go on show

via Khmer Times, 04 January 2018:

The government will launch a special exhibition of old Khmer jewellery and ornaments, especially a set of ancient Angkorian gold jewellery that has been returned to Cambodia, to let the public see how beautiful these…

Source: Ancient Angkorian jewellery to go on show – Khmer Times

See also:

Art review: Cambodia loans rare work to Cleveland Museum of Art

via Ohio.com: 14 December 2017

In 2015 the Cleveland Museum of Art forged a Cultural Cooperation Agreement with the National Museum of Cambodia, following the transfer of a 10th-century Khmer sculpture of the monkey god Hanuman from Cleveland to Cambodia. This agreement has allowed for works of art to be loaned for exhibition at the CMA, to promote knowledge and appreciation of Cambodia’s cultural heritage.

Source: Art review: Cambodia loans rare work to Cleveland Museum of Art – Ohio.com

Over 400 Bornean ethnographic artifacts in Holland to come home soon

via Borneo Post, 25 November 2017:

KUCHING: More than 400 Bornean ethnographic artifacts will be returned to Sarawak Museum from a museum in the City of Delft in the Netherlands. The artifacts were symbolically handed over by Delft …

Source: Over 400 Bornean ethnographic artifacts in Holland to come home soon

Cambodia lends spectacular sculpted wall from Banteay Chhmar to Cleveland Museum of Art

via Cleveland.com, 15 October 2017

The Cleveland Museum of Art on Saturday opened a fascinating new exhibition focusing on a wall removed from a Cambodian temple by looters, but later recovered by the government.

Source: Cambodia lends spectacular sculpted wall from Banteay Chhmar to Cleveland Museum of Art (photos) | cleveland.com