Disaster Risk Management resources

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Brazil Museum fire Photograph: Ricardo Moraes/Reuters

By now you would have heard about the terrible fire that consumed the Brazil National Museum which destroyed the largest museum collection in Latin America. The emerging story is that poor maintenance and funding cuts played a large role into this disaster of cultural heritage. The tragedy in Brazil could just as easily happen in Southeast Asia – just this year, we already saw fires at the Jakarta Maritime Museum and the National Archives of the Philippines. In this light I want to share some resources in Disaster Risk Management for cultural heritage that might be useful reading.

Brazil Museum fire Photograph: Ricardo Moraes/Reuters

Brazil Museum fire Photograph: Ricardo Moraes/Reuters

If you have any other resources to suggest, please leave a comment or send me an email and I will update the list.

Bringing salvaged wooden ships and artifacts back to life with ‘smart’ nanotech

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via ScienceDaily, 21 August 2018: Not about Southeast Asia, but of interest to underwater archaeologists. A possible way to preserve wood recovered from underwater contexts through the use of smart nanocomposite particles.

When a shipwreck is brought up from the sea depths, the wood quickly starts deteriorating. Scientists are reporting a novel way to use ‘smart’ nanocomposites to conserve a 16th-century British warship, the Mary Rose, and its artifacts. The new approach could help preserve other salvaged ships by eliminating harmful acids without damaging the wooden structures themselves.

Source: Bringing salvaged wooden ships and artifacts back to life with ‘smart’ nanotech

CFP: International Convention of Asia Scholars 2019

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ICAS 11 Leiden, 16-19 July 2019
The 11th International Convention of Asia Scholars (ICAS) is the most inclusive international gathering in the field of Asian Studies. ICAS attracts participants from over 60 countries to engage in global dialogues on Asia that transcend boundaries between academic disciplines and geographic areas. The meeting place for the eleventh edition of ICAS is Leiden, the Netherlands. The historic city of Leiden is home to one of the oldest universities, Leiden University, and several of the most renowned Asia research centers. Leiden University will be the main host of ICAS 11, partnering with the city, research institutions and museums, who share equally rich Asian and global connections.

Call for proposals – deadline: 10 October 2018
The submission deadline for proposals of Individual Abstracts, Panels, Roundtables, Book presentations and PhD Dissertation presentations is 10 October 2018.

Official website: International Convention of Asia Scholars 2019

ArchaeoGlobe: Join the first Global Assessment of Archaeological Knowledge on Land Use

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The ArchaeoGlobe Project is a “massively collaborative effort” (see Gowers & Nielsen 2009) to assess archaeological knowledge on human land use across the globe over the past 10,000 years.

Join our broad network of archaeologists to share your expert knowledge on past land use across the globe, through a questionnaire on regional land use in 10 distinct timeslices (10,000 bp, 8,000 bp, 6,000 bp, 4,000 bp, 3,000 bp, 2,000 bp, 1,000 bp, 1500 CE, 1750 CE, 1850 CE). With your regional expertise, we can build the first global inventory of archaeological expert knowledge on Earth’s long-term transformation by human use of land.

View the global map of regions and subregions in Google Maps.
ArchaeoGlobe Survey Structure Diagram
Archaeologists completing the questionnaire for at least 4 subregions will be listed as co-authors on the resulting paper (unless they opt out), which we aim to publish in a high profile cross-disciplinary journal (e.g. Nature, Science, PNAS). Filling out the questionnaire for a single subregion takes 7-10 minutes, so we are asking co-authors to devote 1-2 hours of their time. Coauthors are invited to participate further in paper production, as desired.

Survey-based approach, ‘crowdsourcing’ expert knowledge
Co-authorship for substantial knowledge contributions
All results will be fully available in an open-source format
Assess levels of knowledge on four land use categories:
Foraging/hunting/gathering/fishing
Extensive agriculture
Intensive agriculture
Pastoralism

Source: ArchaeoGlobe

Archaeological Ethics Database

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An interesting web resource:

This database is an ongoing project by the Register of Professional Archaeologists (the Register) and the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (CIfA). The goal of the database is to bring together sources on archaeological ethics in a single place for the use of students, researchers, and professional archaeologists. The archaeological ethics database includes over five hundred sources relating to ethics in archaeology.

Archaeological Ethics Database

Reality Check: Who owns treasure hidden under the sea?

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via BBC, 4 June 2018: The article is based on the 300-year-old San Jose wreck found off the coast of Cartagena, but discusses various issues surrounding the claiming of shipwrecks, the preservation of cultural heritage and claims under international laws which are relevant to Southeast Asia.

Claims over shipwrecks have led to long legal battles over the years.

Source: Reality Check: Who owns treasure hidden under the sea?

An Incredibly Detailed Map Of Medieval Trade Routes

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via Merchant Machine, 19 May 2018: Trade routes of the world in the 11th and 12th centuries, including Southeast Asia!

Map created by reddit user martinjanmansson. Click to zoom in. The map above is probably the most detailed map of Medieval Trade Routes in Europe, Asia and Africa in the 11th and 12th centuries you can find online. It includes major and minor locations, major and minor routes, sea routes, canals

Source: An Incredibly Detailed Map Of Medieval Trade Routes

CFP: Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia

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Rising Voices in Southeast Asian Studies – A SEAC / AAS Initiative with Support from the journal, TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia

Submission Deadline: June 15, 2018

The Southeast Asia Council (SEAC) of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) is seeking paper proposals from up-and-coming scholars to join a “Rising Voices” panel on the broad topic of “Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia.” We seek to recruit early career scholars from Southeast Asian countries in order to form a panel for eventual inclusion in the 2019 Annual Conference of the Association for Asian Studies, to be held in Denver, CO from March 21-24, 2019.

The panel will be chaired by Dr. Nam C. Kim, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Once paper presenters have been selected, the chair, along with Dr. Oona Paredes, Assistant Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore, will assist the panelists in preparing a panel abstract, facilitate revision of individual paper proposals, and offer mentoring and networking support to the panel participants, as needed.

With financial support from the AAS and the journal TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia, SEAC will be able to offer modest travel support to certain members of the panel with demonstrated need in traveling to the conference from Southeast Asia. It is hoped that participation in the panel will also enable scholars to obtain funding from other sources, including the individual country groups at AAS, as well as their home institutions, to stay for the whole conference. Once the panel is formed, the organizers will also make every effort to help panelists seek additional funding on the basis of demonstrated need. Upon completion of the conference, authors will be encouraged to submit their papers to TRaNS for potential publication, subject to peer-review.

Panel Topic Details

For the 2019 Rising Voices Panel, we seek to build a panel related to the broad topic of “Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia.” The exact panel description will be developed and refined once panelists have been selected, but the topic is designed to be inclusive enough to solicit a wide range of applicants for variant themes.

Papers should build on the recognition that notions about the recent or distant past can play an important role in the formulation of ideas around national identity, ethnicity, cultural heritage, and perceptions of inclusion and exclusion. This is especially so in post-colonial contexts. Contributors are free to present research related to these broad themes from any disciplinary angle, using materials that are archaeological, historical, or contemporary. Related sub-topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Appropriations of the past for nationalistic or political agendas
  • Contested constructions of history or national meta-narratives
  • Identity formation and notions of ethnicity
  • Challenges and opportunities in the interpretation of archaeological data
  • Conflicts over cultural heritage materials and properties, as related to ownership, access, and management
  • Culturally significant or sacred landscapes or artifacts
  • Commodification of the past, tourism, and economic development

While an emphasis on Southeast Asia is a requisite, comparisons with other Asian regions are welcomed and encouraged.

Eligibility and Selection Criteria

We seek papers by Southeast Asian scholars who are early career scholars, or “rising voices.” Rising voices are defined here as advanced graduate students (currently writing dissertations based on original field or archival research) or untenured faculty members (including tenure-track assistant professors, adjuncts, and lecturers, or the approximate equivalent based on the academic tradition from which the scholar is coming). Applicants may be currently enrolled as students in, or employed by, any institution of higher education in the world. However, preference may be placed on students or faculty currently based at underfunded institutions in Late Developing Countries (LDC) in Southeast Asia. (Please note that the definition of LDC used by the AAS excludes the following Asian countries: Australia, Hong Kong, Japan, New Zealand, Republic of China (Taiwan), Republic of Korea (South Korea), and Singapore). In addition to the stated goal of supporting rising voices from Southeast Asia, the primary criteria for selection will be the quality of the paper proposals as well as the way selected proposals work together as a viable panel.

Submission Instructions

To submit a paper proposal, please submit the following, in the order listed below, all in a single Microsoft word file or pdf document, by June 15, 2018:

  • Applicant’s Name, affiliation, and contact information, clearly indicating applicant’s country of birth and current country of residence.
  • Paper abstract. 250 words in the format of the standard AAS paper proposal.
  • Brief bio-sketch of 200-300 words describing current and recent scholarly positions, a brief sentence or two about current research, and any significant publications. The model for this should be the standard blurb one sees on a faculty or graduate student website.
  • Current curriculum vitae.
  • Please save the file with the following filename convention: RisingVoices2019_ApplicantsFamilyName.doc

Completed applications should be sent via email to Dr. Nam C. Kim (nckim2@wisc.edu) and Dr. Oona Paredes (seaomtp@nus.edu.sg) by June 15, 2018, with the subject heading of “2019 SEAC Rising Voices Proposal.”

Notes on Funding

This proposed panel is part of the “Rising Voices Initiative” which was initiated in 2013 by the Southeast Asia Council of the Association of Asian Studies in order to help supplement the limited amount of existing funding to support participation of young Southeast Asian scholars in the annual AAS Conference. Funding has been generously allocated for this project by the AAS Board of Directors and has been supplemented for the 2019 AAS Conference by TRaNS journal.

Application Timeline

  • May 2018: Call for papers published
  • June 15, 2018: Applications due by email to nckim2@wisc.edu and seaomtp@nus.edu.sg
  • July 1, 2018: Notice of selected papers sent out to applicants
  • July 1 – August 1, 2018: Panel description revised, individual paper proposals revised in communication with panel chair, Dr. Nam C. Kim, and Dr. Oona Paredes
  • August 1, 2018: Panel Submission Deadline to AAS

TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia is a journal in the field of Southeast Asian studies published by the Cambridge University Press.  TRaNSencourages globally engaged writings on Southeast Asia that cross national borders and disciplinary boundaries.

Ancient DNA Study Pokes Holes in Horse Domestication Theory

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via National Geographic News, 09 May 2018: Not directly related to Southeast Asia, but may have implications further down the road in relation to when horses first appear in the archaeological record.

A long-held theory on how horse domestication and language spread across Asia has been disrupted by a look at our genetic past.

Source: Ancient DNA Study Pokes Holes in Horse Domestication Theory