Thang Long imperial city excavation reveals large structures

via Vietnam Net, 20 April 2018:

 An archaeological excavation at the Thang Long imperial city in 2017 has uncovered many traces of former buildings and other artefacts dating from the period of Chinese domination up to the Nguyen Dynasty.

Source: Thang Long imperial city excavation reveals large structures

How ancient pottery techniques are getting a reboot in Kampong Chhnang

via Phnom Penh Post, 02 April 2018:

In a little shack in Andong Russey village, at the foot of Phnom Krang Dei Meas mountain, Grandma Moun slaps into shape the round-bottomed clay pot that is the de facto symbol of Kampong Chhnang province.

Source: How ancient pottery techniques are getting a reboot in Kampong Chhnang

ไม่ปล่อยให้โกง…ใช้ “แสงซินโครตรอน” พิสูจน์เครื่องปั้นบ้านเชียงของแท้-ของปลอมได้แม่นยำ

via MGR Online, 26 March 2018: The Thai Fine Arts Department and the Synchrotron Light Research Institute develop ways to study and authenticate Ban Chiang ceramics. Article is in Thai.

ไม่ปล่อยให้โกงนักวิจัยไทย-กรมศิลปากรใช้เทคโนโลยี “แสงซินโครตรอน” พิสูจน์วัตถุโบราณ “บ้านเชียง” อายุ 3,500 ปี ว่าเป็นของปลอมหรือจริงได้แม่นยำ

Source: ไม่ปล่อยให้โกง…ใช้ “แสงซินโครตรอน” พิสูจน์เครื่องปั้นบ้านเชียงของแท้-ของปลอมได้แม่นยำ

WESTERN AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM CATALOGUE OF PREVIOUSLY UNPUBLISHED DATA FROM THAI-AUSTRALIAN EXCAVATIONS IN THAILAND

via the Western Australian Museum: This report has been collated for the purpose of completing the record of artefacts recovered during excavations undertaken by joint Thai-Australian expeditions in the 1980s. This group represented the Thai Fine Arts Department Underwater Archaeology Division, Silapakorn University, the Thai Ceramic Archaeological Project, the Western Australian Museum, the Australian (now Australasian) Institute for Archaeology, the University of Adelaide, the Art Gallery of South Australia and on occasion, participants of the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMO), Special Project in Archaeology and Fine Arts (SPAFA). Participants represented Thailand, Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Canada, Poland and the United States of America. Included is information recorded by the author whilst participating in excavations of kiln sites at Si Satchanalai, Sukhothai Province and the Bang Rachan or Mae Nam Noi Kiln site, Singburi Province, Thailand during the 1980s. A brief visit was also made to the Ban Bang Pun Kiln site, Suphanburi. The author was also privileged to have been given access to the ceramic sherd collection of the National Museum of the Philippines, Manila and those of the regional museums of Butuan and Cebu cities.

Training in Thin-Section Petrography for Use in Archaeological Ceramic Studies

Training opportunity for Thin-Section Petrography in ceramics studies. Deadline is 26 Janaury 2018:

Notice of Workshop at the Angkor Ceramics Unit
Training in Thin-Section Petrography for Use in Archaeological Ceramic Studies
5 – 9 March, 2018
Siem Reap, Cambodia

This workshop is designed for Southeast Asian practicing archaeologists and advanced students engaged in the study of ceramics and excavation of ceramic kilns. Led by two experienced senior specialists, the workshop will convey knowledge of the techniques and uses of polarized light microscopy of ceramics and stone, known as thin-section petrography, and standard ceramic engineering tests of sherds and raw materials.

The program will take place from Monday 5 March through Friday 9 March 2018 in Siem Reap, Cambodia, at the Angkor Ceramics Unit. The Angkor Ceramics Unit stores and studies ceramics excavated from kiln sites in Greater Angkor. In 2015 it was declared an official component of the Angkor International Center for Research and Documentation, a division of the Apsara Authority (Authority for the Protection of the Site and Management of the Region of Angkor), with the official endorsement of UNESCO.

The workshop will consist of a hands-on short course on thin-section petrographic analysis of archaeological ceramics, together with hands-on observation and testing of the structure (optical microscopy, chemical tests), composition (pXRF) and properties of sherds and raw materials.Participants will gain skills in low-cost but highly effective methods for identifying the mineralogical constituents of ceramic materials, discerning variability in materials, and relating that variability to differences in geological or archaeological sources and to ceramic technologies. A focus on the specific nature of Cambodian materials is a distinguishing feature of the workshop.

The primary workshop instructors will be Dr. Chandra L. Reedy, Professor in the Center for Historic Architecture and Design and Director of the Laboratory for Analysis of Cultural Materials, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA; and Dr. Pamela B. Vandiver, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Co-Director, Program in Heritage Conservation Science, and Adjunct Professor, School of Anthropology in Archaeology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.

The workshop is organised by H. E. Tan Boun Suy and Dr. Ea Darith of the Angkor International Center for Research and Documentation, Apsara Authority, and Louise Cort, curator for ceramics, Freer|Sackler, Smithsonian Institution. Financial support is provided by the Luce Foundation and the Friends of Khmer Culture.

The workshop is open to 16 practicing archaeologists and advanced students—8 from Cambodia and 8 from other countries in Southeast Asia. Travel assistance, accommodation, food, and limited per diem will be provided.

Applications should be received no later than Friday 26 January 2018. Successful applicants will be advised by email.

APPLICATION

Please submit your application in English by email to Dr. Ea Darith, eadarith@yahoo.com and Louise Cort, cortlo@si.edu. Please provide the following information:

  1. Name (family name in capital letters)
  2. Age, gender
  3. Email address
  4. Home postal address
  5. Institutional affiliation
  6. Name of person to whom you are responsible (such as supervisor or head of department) and that person’s email address
  7. Proposed means of travel to and from your home base and Siem Reap, and estimate of costs
  8. Summary of education (degrees and dates) and previous experience in field archaeology and the study of archaeological ceramics
  9. Brief statement of current research and research interests. Please add citations to your reports and publications, if applicable.

Thank you from the workshop team.

Benjarong in detail

via Bangkok Post, 05 January 2018: Review of Dawn Rooney’s book, Bencharong: Chinese Porcelain For Siam

Benjarong is the brightly coloured porcelain made in China for the Thai market which enjoyed a peak of popularity in the 19th century. Dawn Rooney sets out to provide “a single reference source for Bencharong … the book I wish had been available when I first became interested in this little-known form of ceramic art 20 years ago”.

Source: Benjarong in detail

Development of Regional Maritime Networks during the Early Metal Age in Northern Maluku Islands: A View from Excavated Glass Ornaments and Pottery Variation

New paper by Ono et al. in the Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology

In this paper we discuss the results of excavation at the Aru Manara site in the Northern Maluku islands along with a description of the recovered pottery assemblage and results of compositional analysis of glass ornaments. By comparing our data to those from other sites in the area, we suggest the possible development of regional maritime networks in and around the Northern Maluku Islands during the Early Metal Age. The lowest level of the site contained a large number of secondary human burials, burial pots, and jars with distinctive anthropomorphic and zoomorphic motifs (including human faces and lizards), and possible baked clay ornaments. These all date to between ca. 2100 and 1900 years BP, corresponding to the Early Metal Age in Island Southeast Asia. The site also produced numerous glass beads and bracelets. X-ray fluorescence analysis confirms a high proportion of potash glass that possibly originated from China, Mainland Southeast Asia or India and is common in sites in Thailand and Vietnam dating to between 2500 and 2100 years BP. There was a minor occurrence of high alumina-soda glass beads known as Indo-Pacific beads that originated from India to Southeast Asia and which are commonly found in sites dated between 2300 and 1500 years BP or later. The glass ornaments from different areas, combined with variable pottery, indicates the possible development of maritime and cross-regional networks to the Northern Maluku Islands.

Source: Development of Regional Maritime Networks during the Early Metal Age in Northern Maluku Islands: A View from Excavated Glass Ornaments and Pottery Variation
https://doi.org/10.1080/15564894.2017.1395374