Muzium Negara Pieces Together Origins Of Mankind With Peking Man Exhibit

via The Star, 08 April 2018:

Muzium Negara hosts China’s The Peking Man Exhibition: Zhoukoudian Heritage Site, a touring exhibit shedding light on a species that provides the biological link between ape and man.

Source: Muzium Negara Pieces Together Origins Of Mankind With Peking Man Exhibit | Star2.com

‘They didn’t even have coffins’: The man who dug up the remains of World War II victims in Singapore

via Chanel NewsAsia, 07 April 2018:

SINGAPORE: In 1962, Goh Thiam Hoon had only been digging in the heavy, damp soil for a short while when he found what he was looking for. But achieving his goal on his first day on the job didn’t make him happy. Far from it. “I could not believe it,” he said, describing feelings of uneasiness.  Mr Goh, who was aged 25 at the time, had just uncovered a mass grave filled with piles of bones belonging to victims of the Second World War. This was near Jalan Puay Poon in Bedok, close to where Temasek Junior College now sits.

Source: ‘They didn’t even have coffins’: The man who dug up the remains of World War II victims in Singapore

Archaeologists Find Deformed Dog Buried Near Ancient Child In The Philippines

via Forbes, 26 Feb 2018:

An ancient dog skeleton reveals humans’ attachment to canine companions extends to the past.

Source: Archaeologists Find Deformed Dog Buried Near Ancient Child In The Philippines

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Discovery of world’s oldest funerary fish hooks by ANU archaeologists

via Heritage Daily, 12 December 2017: 12,000-year-old fish hooks found in a burial in Alor Island, Indonesia.

Archaeologists from the Australian National University has discovered five fish hooks dating from the Pleistocene era, approximately 12,000 years ago on Indonesia’s Alor Island.

Source: Discovery of world’s oldest funerary fish hooks by ANU archaeologists

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Skeletons from possible ancient city exposed by riverbank erosion

via Coconuts Yangon, 08 December 2017

Skeletons, urns containing pieces of bones, and the remains of a building were unearthed when a river carried away a chunk of a riverbank on Tuesday.

Source: Skeletons from possible ancient city exposed by riverbank erosion | Coconuts Yangon

Papua New Guinea skull ‘world’s oldest tsunami victim’

via AFP-New Straits Times, 26 October 2017:

A 6,000-year-old skull found in Papua New Guinea is likely the world’s oldest-known tsunami victim, experts said Thursday after a new analysis of the area it was found in.

The partially preserved Aitape Skull was discovered in 1929 by Australian geologist Paul Hossfeld, 12 kilometres (seven miles) inland from the northern coast of the Pacific nation.

It was long thought to belong to Homo erectus (upright man), an extinct species thought to be an ancestor of the modern human that died out some 140,000 years ago.

But more recent radiocarbon dating estimated it was closer to 6,000 years old, making it a member of our own species – Homo sapiens. At that time, sea levels were higher and the area would have been near the coast.

An international team led by the University of New South Wales returned to the site to collect the same geological deposits observed by Hossfeld.

Source: Papua New Guinea skull ‘world’s oldest tsunami victim’ | New Straits Times | Malaysia General Business Sports and Lifestyle News

The struggle to understand the Hobbit

via Cosmos, 27 September 2017:

The discovery of Homo floresiensis in 2003 threw up many questions about the history of our own species. More than a decade later, they remain unanswered. Debbie Argue, biological anthropologist at the Australian National University, explains why.

Source: The struggle to understand the Hobbit | Cosmos

‘We’ve found the missing 20,000 years’: crucial piece in human migration puzzle

via Sydney Morning Herald, 20 August 2017: An interview with Dr Kira Westaway from the University of Wollonggong and the events leading to the paper about finding 65,000 year old human remains in Sumatra.

The discovery by Australian scientist Kira Westaway took treks through Indonesian rainforest, a dogged refusal to take no for an answer, and a fax machine.

Source: ‘We’ve found the missing 20,000 years’: crucial piece in human migration puzzle