Tim Arkeologi Temukan Sisa Bangunan Kayu di Situs Liyangan

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via Tempo, 3 November 2018

via Tempo, 3 November 2018: A team of archaeologists discover the remains of wooden buildings in Central Java. Article is in Bahasa.

via Tempo, 3 November 2018

via Tempo, 3 November 2018

The research team at the Liyangan Archaeological Center in Yogyakarta discovered a unit of the remaining wooden buildings on the site Liyangan, Temanggung, during the research period October 18 to November 4, 2018. The former building was found outside the Liyangan Temple area in Liyangan Hamlet. Purbasari Village, Ngadirejo District, Temanggung Regency, Central Java.

The researchers found fibers, bamboo, and wood, all of which were shaped like charcoal and weathered. The rest of the building was buried with material from Sindoro Mountain which was known to have erupted violently and catapulted thousands of material cubes in the 11th century.

Source: Tim Arkeologi Temukan Sisa Bangunan Kayu di Situs Liyangan – travel Tempo.co

Fine Arts Department frets over ‘illegal’ gold painting of numerous temples

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via The Nation, 02 November 2018: Puen Ruam Thang, led by veteran singer Suthep Prayoonpitak, told media last week that it had “renovated” more than 200 temples – including those registered as monuments – across the Kingdom and plan to continue doing so.

IMMEDIATE ACTION is required to renovate the hundreds of historical temples painted in gold across the Kingdom, the Fine Arts Department said early this week.

Source: Fine Arts Department frets over ‘illegal’ gold painting of numerous temples

Burmese days: Yangon monuments to the rare Chinese who made their fortunes in colonial era

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Chin Tsong Palace in Yangon. Source: South China Morning Post 20181102

via South China Morning Post, 02 November 2018: Interesting story about heritage houses in Yangon built by Chinese tycoons in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Chin Tsong Palace in Yangon. Source: South China Morning Post 20181102

Chin Tsong Palace in Yangon. Source: South China Morning Post 20181102

Ethnic Chinese accounted for less than 3 per cent of the population of Burma in 1881, a figure that had increased to 8.9 per cent by 1911, at which time Indians made up 56 per cent of the population, according to figures cited in Mapping Chinese Rangoon. By 1931, the Indian population of Rangoon exceeded one million, while the ethnic Chinese population was less than 200,000.

Although the races were not legally forced to live separately, downtown Rangoon was essentially divided into three quarters: the European quarter east of Sule Pagoda Road, the Indian quarter west of Sule Pagoda Road, and the Chinese quarter west of the Indian quarter (starting around Shwedagon Pagoda Road) down to 19th Street – now the culinary heart of Yangon’s Chinatown.

A westward stroll down Maha Bandoola Road takes the visitor past still visibly Indian neighbourhoods, with their mosques and Hindu temples; these slowly make way for Chinatown, with its Guan Yin and Kheng Hock Keong temples, and restaurants serving typical southern Chinese cuisine – noodles and pork, chicken and rice, and the ubiquitous fried rice and fried noodles.

Rangoon’s overseas Chinese were drawn to opportunities the city’s booming commercial port offered. While some came by land, crossing into upper Myanmar from Yunnan province, the majority were Cantonese speakers from Guangdong and Hokkien speakers from Fujian, who came by sea.

Source: Burmese days: Yangon monuments to the rare Chinese who made their fortunes in colonial era | South China Morning Post

Priest faces raps for Molo convent renovation

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Molo Church, Iloilo City. Source: Panay News, 05 Sep 2018

via Panay News, 05 Sep 2018: Unauthorised renovations made on a century-old church in the Philippines.

Molo Church, Iloilo City. Source: Panay News, 05 Sep 2018

Molo Church, Iloilo City. Source: Panay News, 05 Sep 2018

The Sangguniang Panlungsod’s (SP) committee on tourism and cultural affairs has recommended the filing of charges against Monsignor Maurillo Silva, administrator of St. Anne Parish in Molo district for the unauthorized renovation of the Molo Church’s convent.

The charges could be for violation of Republic Act 10066 (National Cultural Heritage Act of 2009) and the National Building Code, among others, according to the committee chaired by Councilor Candice Tupas.

Source: Priest faces raps for Molo convent renovation

Bringing back the forgotten palace

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via Bangkok Post, 12 June 2018: Wang Na, or the Front Palace, is more commonly known as the National Museum in Bangkok.

While the Grand Palace is world famous for its palatial architecture, the old Front Palace, or Wang Na, of ancient viceroys is hidden in obscurity although its beauty is second to none. Today it is just known simply as the National Museum Bangkok, rather than a palace with deep historical and artistic significance.

Source: Bringing back the forgotten palace