Miagao Church’s naked coralline limestone, a mistake for authenticity

via Bluprintm, 5 June 2018

Without protective plastering, the coralline limestone facade of the Miagao Church glows a golden sheen dawn after dawn belying signs of worsening decay under its skin

Source: Miagao Church’s naked coralline limestone, a mistake for authenticity – Bluprint

Bringing back the forgotten palace

via Bangkok Post, 12 June 2018: Wang Na, or the Front Palace, is more commonly known as the National Museum in Bangkok.

While the Grand Palace is world famous for its palatial architecture, the old Front Palace, or Wang Na, of ancient viceroys is hidden in obscurity although its beauty is second to none. Today it is just known simply as the National Museum Bangkok, rather than a palace with deep historical and artistic significance.

Source: Bringing back the forgotten palace

Chăm tower to be reinforced

via Viet Nam News, 11 May 2018:

The central province, in co-operation with the Institute for Conservation of Monuments under the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism, will begin an urgent project to protect B3 tower in the UNESCO-recognised Mỹ Sơn Sanctuary from collapse before rainy season.

Source: Chăm tower to be reinforced

What we lost in the fire: Notes on our archives, and the buildings that house them

via ABS-CBN News, 1 June 2018: Last week, the Juan Luna Building in Manila, which is the home of the National Archives of the Philippines, caught fire. Fortunately no historic documents were lost (the documents are kept elsewhere), but the building itself was historic.

Early this week, panic swept through the heritage conservation set, the culturati, historians, and concerned citizens of Facebook as news broke that our National Archives was on fire. That it was the building that was burning, and not all the documentation housed inside it, came almost as an afterthought.

Source: What we lost in the fire: Notes on our archives, and the buildings that house them

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Officials to reopen some Bagan pagodas to climbing tourists

via Myanmar Times, 28 May 2018:

The authorities will permit a limited number of visitors to climb five pagodas in Bagan to view the sunrise and sunset starting in September, said U Aung Aung Kyaw, director of the Department of Archaeology and National Museum in Bagan.

Source: Officials to reopen some Bagan pagodas to climbing tourists

[Lecture] Bangkok: Past and Present

If you’re in Bangkok this week, SEAMEO SPAFA and Siam Society are having the annual Capital’s Archaeology Lectures on Wednesday, 23 May 2018 at 18.30 hrs. This year, the talks focus on the archaeology and urban heritage of Bangkok. (Disclosure: I work for SEAMEO SPAFA, and this lecture series is an event I am organising).

The SEAMEO Regional Centre for Archaeology and Fine Arts (SEAMEO SPAFA) and the Siam Society will organize two lectures on the archaeology and urban conservation of Bangkok, as part of SEAMEO SPAFA’s lecture series on the archaeology of the Capitals of Southeast Asia.

  • Archaeology in Bangkok
    Bangkok was found in 1782 by the first monarch of the present Chakri dynasty. Nevertheless, historical records and archaeological evidences indicate the dynamic of settlement patterns through time from Ayutthaya period to present (ca. 800 years ago). Nowadays, Bangkok has been changed rapidly through the urban expansion and infrastructure developments. Archaeological studies in Bangkok have started systematically in the past 25 years. All of the archaeological excavations were considered as rescue/salvage archaeology or salvage of archaeological evidence before the archaeological sites were destroyed in order to develop, conserve, or improve knowledge regarding historic activities at these sites. There are more than 30 archaeological excavation sites, which are layered under dense infrastructure. Archaeological excavation project work closely with infrastructure development projects such as the mass rapid transit projects. Very tangible ruins and artefacts were revealed through a systematic excavation. The excavation of Siriraj Piyamaharajkarun Hospital is the best example of archaeology in Bangkok, which was conducted while digging to prepare the base construction of a new medical building in 2008. Many artefacts including the remains of wooden boat and ancient city wall were found. Therefore, an archaeological study was conducted in this area for this purpose.
    Dr Kannika Suteerattanapirom is archaeologist and assistant professor of the faculty of archaeology, Silpakorn university in Bangkok, Thailand. Her ongoing research focuses on urban archaeology in Bangkok. She has undertaken numerous archaeological excavation projects in Bangkok. Her current research project entitled ‘state of knowledge of Bangkok archaeology: information, direction and plan of conservation and development in the future’.
  • Rattanakosin: Urban heritage of Bangkok
    “Rattanakosin Island” is the origin of Bangkok metropolitan area. Urban permanence falls under two criteria: tangible permanences, mostly old buildings inventoried as historic monuments, and intangible permanences, ancient urban features that remain in the city today in the form of activities and functions. The Chao Phraya River is the major structuring element of the city since its origin. The river and the three concentric boundary canals, dug successively, have limited and defined Rattanakosin Island, according to the traditional notions of Thai culture and in agreement with the former treaties on military art. The river and the three axes of urban expansion are the major permanence have guided the development of the city since the founding of Rattanakosin to the present metropolis. Today the construction of the road network has lessened the importance of water in the city and led to the disappearance of traditional urban features such as floating markets and clusters of houseboats, but the activity related to the river remains intense.
    Dr. Pornthum Thumwimol is a Landscape Architect of the Fine Arts Department in the Ministry of Culture, Thailand. He received his Doctorate in Architecture from the University of Paris VIII and the Research Institute for Architecture (IPRAUS) in Paris, a Pre-doctorate (DEA) in the Philosophy of Landscape architecture and Master degree in Architecture and Urban Planning, Architecture School of Paris de la Villette, Paris, France and a Bachelor of Landscape architecture from Chulalongkorn University. He has engaged in a wide range of design and planning projects, both in architecture and landscape architecture and received numerous prestigious awards, including The Association of Siamese Architects (ASA) Excellence and Honour Awards for the design of Panumrung information centre (1992). He is involved in the establishment of cultural landscape studies in Thailand and has been a writer and co-editor for several books and articles.

 

Historic elephant palace in Ayutthaya to get Bt30 million makeover

via The Nation, 06 May 2018:

The Fine Arts Department will spend Bt30 million on improving the Ayutthaya Elephant Palace & Royal Kraal. Sacred and rare rituals will be carried out at the facility on Monday to mark the start of conservation efforts.

Source: Historic elephant palace in Ayutthaya to get Bt30 million makeover – The Nation

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