Farmer discovers mystery stone tablet in Anlong Veng

via Phnom Penh Post, 09 April 2018

Historians and archaeologists are working to determine the origin and significance of a stone tablet appearing to bear the inscription of a Khmer King’s royal directive that a farmer found last week in an Oddar Meanchey cassava field.

Source: Farmer discovers mystery stone tablet in Anlong Veng

Tourism creates thorny ethical dilemmas. Isn’t that the point?

via Quartz, 14 April 2018:

A temple, a hat, and a vexing moral question for tourists.

On a recent holiday in Cambodia, as I marveled at the magnificent Angkor Wat temple complex, a commotion broke my reverie.

I had already noticed the other tourist involved: a white woman wearing an Asian conical hat. I had snapped a photo of the mesmerizing Baphuon temple with her in the foreground, walking toward it (above). But when she got to the entrance, she was blocked by a guard.

“In Cambodia, the Vietnamese hat is not allowed,” the guard told her.

Source: Tourism creates thorny ethical dilemmas. Isn’t that the point?

ភ្ញៀវប្រចាំថ្ងៃ – លោក​សាឃឿន ​សក្តា​៖​ ​ការ​​រក​​ឃើញ​​អតីត​​រាជ​វាំង​​លើ​​ខ្នង​​ភ្នំ​គូលែន ​​មាន​​សារ​សំខាន់ ​​សម្រាប់​​​ចុះ​​បញ្ជី​​សម្បត្តិ​បេតិក​ភណ្ឌ​ពិភព​​លោក​​

via RFI, 09 April 2018: A radio interview with Cambodian archaeologist Sakada Sakhouen (a good friend of mine) about the recent excavation of the palace site in Phnom Kulen. Article and interview is in Khmer.

Source: ភ្ញៀវប្រចាំថ្ងៃ – លោក​សាឃឿន ​សក្តា​៖​ ​ការ​​រក​​ឃើញ​​អតីត​​រាជ​វាំង​​លើ​​ខ្នង​​ភ្នំ​គូលែន ​​មាន​​សារ​សំខាន់ ​​សម្រាប់​​​ចុះ​​បញ្ជី​​សម្បត្តិ​បេតិក​ភណ្ឌ​ពិភព​​លោក​​

Splendour of Khmer art

via Straits Times, 09 April 2018: Article is behind a paywall

Arts News -In 1931, the French government built a life-sized replica of Angkor Wat in Paris to show off its interest in Khmer art and the-then colony of Indochina.. Read more at straitstimes.com.

Source: Splendour of Khmer art, Arts News & Top Stories – The Straits Times

Restoring Angkor Wat: An Interview with Japanese Scholar Ishizawa Yoshiaki

via Nippon.com. 06 April 2018:

Award-winning Japanese scholar Ishizawa Yoshiaki is one of the world’s leading authorities on Khmer inscriptions of the Angkor period (802–1431). His honors include the Ramon Magsaysay Award, sometimes described as the “Asian Nobel,” for his contributions over the course of half a century in restoring to the Cambodian people a sense of pride in their cultural heritage. We spoke to him about his long career working on the monuments at Angkor and his efforts to train a new generation of Cambodian conservators.

Source: Restoring Angkor Wat: An Interview with Japanese Scholar Ishizawa Yoshiaki