Vale Ian Glover

I am sorry to share the news of the passing of Ian Glover, a titan in the field of Southeast Asian archaeology. Lia Genovese shares the following:

Dear All,

In case you have not heard. Some very sad news.

Ian Glover passed away yesterday, on his birthday, while on holiday in Sicily. He collapsed after breakfast in Catania and could not be revived.

Only this afternoon I emailed him to wish him happy birthday again and to tell him about my recent fieldwork in Borneo. I also told him that conferences will never be the same again without him. I was referring to a recent conversation I had with Ian, when he told me that he would not be attending the IPPA in September this year because “he had nothing new to say”.

RIP, Ian, a gentleman and a most generous scholar.

ភ្ញៀវប្រចាំថ្ងៃ – លោក​សាឃឿន ​សក្តា​៖​ ​ការ​​រក​​ឃើញ​​អតីត​​រាជ​វាំង​​លើ​​ខ្នង​​ភ្នំ​គូលែន ​​មាន​​សារ​សំខាន់ ​​សម្រាប់​​​ចុះ​​បញ្ជី​​សម្បត្តិ​បេតិក​ភណ្ឌ​ពិភព​​លោក​​

via RFI, 09 April 2018: A radio interview with Cambodian archaeologist Sakada Sakhouen (a good friend of mine) about the recent excavation of the palace site in Phnom Kulen. Article and interview is in Khmer.

Source: ភ្ញៀវប្រចាំថ្ងៃ – លោក​សាឃឿន ​សក្តា​៖​ ​ការ​​រក​​ឃើញ​​អតីត​​រាជ​វាំង​​លើ​​ខ្នង​​ភ្នំ​គូលែន ​​មាន​​សារ​សំខាន់ ​​សម្រាប់​​​ចុះ​​បញ្ជី​​សម្បត្តិ​បេតិក​ភណ្ឌ​ពិភព​​លោក​​

Restoring Angkor Wat: An Interview with Japanese Scholar Ishizawa Yoshiaki

via Nippon.com. 06 April 2018:

Award-winning Japanese scholar Ishizawa Yoshiaki is one of the world’s leading authorities on Khmer inscriptions of the Angkor period (802–1431). His honors include the Ramon Magsaysay Award, sometimes described as the “Asian Nobel,” for his contributions over the course of half a century in restoring to the Cambodian people a sense of pride in their cultural heritage. We spoke to him about his long career working on the monuments at Angkor and his efforts to train a new generation of Cambodian conservators.

Source: Restoring Angkor Wat: An Interview with Japanese Scholar Ishizawa Yoshiaki

Go Deep With Thailand’s 1st Female Undersea Relic Hunter

via Khaosod English, 08 March 2018: Last week we celebrated International Womens’ Day, and Khaosod English profile Jo Sankhaprasit, a female underwater archaeologist in Thailand.

Dive into the Gulf of Thailand with Pornnatcha “Jo” Sankhaprasit in search of the relics and secrets of a 700-year-old shipwreck.

Source: Go Deep With Thailand’s 1st Female Undersea Relic Hunter

NSFs who went AWOL helped archaeology dig at Fort Canning Hill: John N. Miksic interview

via Mothership.sg, 25 Feb 2018: Interview feature of Prof. John Miksic

Singapore’s Indiana Jones? Sort of.

Source: NSFs who went AWOL helped archaeology dig at Fort Canning Hill: John N. Miksic interview

Dr. Miriam Stark to Give Series of Talks in February

Dr. Miriam Stark, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, will give a series of talks at Duke, USC, and UCLA in the month of February. Her research broadly examines examines political and economic transformations in Southeast Asia, with foci on settlement structure and economy

Source: Dr. Miriam Stark to Give Series of Talks in February

Archaeologist wins inaugural Singapore history prize

via Straits Times, 12 January 2018: Congratulations to Prof. John Miksic for his book, Singapore and the Singapore and the Silk Road of the Sea!

Singapore News -SINGAPORE – A pioneering archaeologist whose work emphasizes that Singapore’s history goes beyond the landing of Sir Stamford Raffles in 1819 has been awarded the inaugural Singapore History Prize.. Read more at straitstimes.com.

Source: Archaeologist wins inaugural Singapore history prize, Singapore News & Top Stories – The Straits Times

Follow Darren Curnoe on his Niah Caves excavation

Darren Curnoe of the University of New South Wales is on his three-week excavation of the Niah Caves in Sarawak and he will be tweeting and broadcasting his experiences on Facebook Live. You can follow his progress here:

Darren Curnoe – Anthropologist. 80 likes. Biological anthropologist and archaeologist with an insatiable curiosity about the kind of creature we are and how we came to be this way.

Source: Darren Curnoe – Anthropologist