Bronze moulds found in Yen Bai Province

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Bronze moulds from Yen Bai Province. source: Viet Nam Net 20160628

Stone moulds used for metal working were discovered in northern Vietnam.

Bronze moulds from Yen Bai Province. source: Viet Nam Net 20160628

Bronze moulds from Yen Bai Province. source: Viet Nam Net 20160628

Dong Son-era bronze casting moulds found in Yen Bai
Viet Nam Net, 28 June 2016

Axe- and chisel-shaped moulds made of stone dating back to the Dong Son civilisation (about 2,000 – 3,000 years ago) have been discovered in the northern mountainous province of Yen Bai.

The axe-shaped mould is 8.1cm long, 5.1cm wide and 2cm thick, and weighs 120 grammes. Meanwhile, the chisel-shaped one is 11.2cm long, 5.6cm wide and 3.2cm thick, and weighs 360 grammes.

The two stone moulds are being kept at the provincial museum, according to the museum’s Deputy Director Ly Kim Khoa.

He said in early March this year, a farmer found two stone objects with unusual carvings at an eroded section on the Hong (Red) riverbank in Dong An commune, Yen Bai’s Van Yen district. The farmer sent the objects to the museum for examination.

Full story here.

Rock carvings found in north Vietnam

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Rock Carvings in Yen Bai province. Source: Viet Nam News 20150807

A set of carved boulders have been discovered in the north Vietnamese province of Yen Bai, thought to be made in the 16th or 17th centuries. Carved boulders are known in other nearby provinces such as Lao Cai and Ha Giang, but it is not known if they are related.

Rock Carvings in Yen Bai province. Source: Viet Nam News 20150807

Rock Carvings in Yen Bai province. Source: Viet Nam News 20150807

Old carvings excite scientists
Viet Nam News, 07 August 2015

Around 20 big stones with figures carved on these and dating as far back as 16th or 17th century have been discovered recently by scientists from the Yen Bai Province’s museum.

The stones, measuring between two cubic metres and 50 cubic metres, were found scattered in various communes of Che Cu Nha, La Pan Tau, Lao Chai and De Xu Phinh.

Figures carved on the stones includes images of terrace rice fields, flamingos, horses, astrological maps, yin-yang and five basic elements’ symbols and mysterious lines, believed to be some kind of ancient characters.

Full story here.

Excavations of Burial Sites at Vietnamese Re-Education Camps by The Returning Casualty

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And now, for archaeology of a more recent time. The Returning Casualty is a American-Vietnamese charity  whose work involves the excavation of camp cemeteries so the remains of the soldiers can be returned to their families after DNA testing. Julie Martin, who is studying for an MSc in Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology at Cranfield University in the UK shares her recent work with The Returning Casualty at a 2010 excavation in Yen Bai Province. [Text and photos by Julie Martin.]

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Archaeological objects dug up in 2 provinces

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1 Aug 2006 (Vietnam Net Bridge) – A composite of two stories, the first reports finds of Tran Dynsaty artifacts from Yen Bai Province, the second already mentioned on a previous post of the fishing village in the Khanh Hoa Province. Sorry for the delay! I’ve been ill.

Archaeological objects dug up in 2 provinces

A number of Tran Dynasty (1225-1400) relics have been uncovered during an excavation of the archaeological site at the [tag]Ben Lan Pagoda[/tag] in the northwestern province of Yen Bai.

Archaeologists from the Viet Nam Institute of Archaeology (VNIA) and the Yen Bai Museum discovered vestiges of 12 terracotta towers, increasing the number of towers at the site to 14. The first two towers were found during another excavation last year.

Tran Dynasty's vestiges unearthed in northern province

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17 July 2006 (Nhan Dan) – Remains of Tran dynasty terracota towers found in north Vietnam.

Tran Dynasty’s vestiges unearthed in northern province

Vestiges of 12 terracotta towers and a quadrangular stone wall measuring 295 m in perimeter dating back to the Tran Dynasty (1225-1400) were found at the [tag]Hac Y archaeological site[/tag] in Luc Yen district of northern Yen Bai province.