Bringing salvaged wooden ships and artifacts back to life with ‘smart’ nanotech

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via ScienceDaily, 21 August 2018: Not about Southeast Asia, but of interest to underwater archaeologists. A possible way to preserve wood recovered from underwater contexts through the use of smart nanocomposite particles.

When a shipwreck is brought up from the sea depths, the wood quickly starts deteriorating. Scientists are reporting a novel way to use ‘smart’ nanocomposites to conserve a 16th-century British warship, the Mary Rose, and its artifacts. The new approach could help preserve other salvaged ships by eliminating harmful acids without damaging the wooden structures themselves.

Source: Bringing salvaged wooden ships and artifacts back to life with ‘smart’ nanotech

Wooden bridge of Kanchanaburi reopens

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Saphan Mon, Bangkok Post 20141012

The second longest wood bridge in the world, Saphan Mon in Thailand’s Kanchanaburi province, reopens last weekend after repairs, having been damaged by the flood season. The longest wooden bridge is also located in Southeast Asia: The U Bein Bridge in Myanmar.

Saphan Mon, Bangkok Post 20141012

Saphan Mon, Bangkok Post 20141012

Locals add finishing touch to Mon bridge
Bangkok Post, 12 October 2014

Thousands join celebration on reopening of ‘Saphan Mon’ wooden bridge
National News Bureau of Thailand, 18 October 2014
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