Job: University of Sydney – Postdoctoral Research Associate

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Postdoc Opportunity at the University of Sydney Southeast Asia Centre, for research in heritage and the arts. Deadline is 31 January 2019.

Australia’s premier centre for the multidisciplinary study of Southeast Asia, the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre (SSEAC) responds to the complexity of Southeast Asia as a region and to its growing importance in our rapidly changing world. Drawing on the expertise of over 400 academics across a broad range of disciplines, SSEAC supports research excellence; works to foster a new generation of Southeast Asia experts; and partners with government, business and civil society groups to address real-world issues.

SSEAC’s postdoctoral positions are available to postdoctoral researchers working on topics related to our five research clusters—economic and social development, environment and resources, health, heritage and the arts, state and society—in any Southeast Asian country (or countries) and in any discipline. This year, we are offering one postdoctoral position, open to applicants working on any one of our five themes.

Appointees must have the support of a relevant host department. They are required to spend up to 20% of their time on centre duties, allocated at the discretion of the SSEAC director. The remaining 80% of their time is available for their own research projects, with research targets set in consultation with the SSEAC director or her delegate. Candidates who have held their PhDs for no more than three (3) years (or equivalent if there have been career interruptions) are eligible to apply.

In this position, you will:

conduct your individual research according to an agreed timeline and scope
prepare and submit high-quality publications according to an agreed timeline
design, plan, schedule and prepare for implementation of future research projects
contribute to the life of SSEAC through a range of SSEAC-related duties.

About you

The University values courage and creativity; openness and engagement; inclusion and diversity; and respect and integrity. As such, we see the importance in recruiting talent aligned to these values in the pursuit of research excellence. We are looking for a Postdoctoral Research Associate who possesses:

PhD in a relevant field of study (awarded no earlier than 1st January 2016 and no later than 1st January 2019, though consideration will be given for those with significant career interruption)
experience conducting original research related to Southeast Asia
experience publishing in high-quality journals
a willingness and ability to actively contribute to the life of SSEAC
capacity to work independently and as part of a team.

Source: University of Sydney – Postdoctoral Research Associate

Uncovering Mahendrapvarta

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Over the weekend The Age had a feature on the discoveries of urban sprawl at Phnom Kulen, which predate Angkor by a few hundred years. I’ve had the pleasure of working with the Greater Angkor Project in recent years and it’s great to see the news of the excellent LiDAR data being released to the public. Certainly much more news to come from this region! Be sure to click on the first link to watch the video.

The lost city
The Age, 14 June 2013

Archaeologists Discover Lost City In Cambodian Jungle
NPR, 14 June 2013

Lost medieval city found in Cambodia
AFP, via ChannelNews Asia, 15 June 2013
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Call for Papers: Indonesia Council Open Conference

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Indonesia Council Open Conference 2009
University of Sydney
Camperdown Campus
15 – 17 July 2009
Please refer to the Indonesia Council website for registration details.

The Indonesia Council will be holding its fifth Open Conference on 15-17 July 2009, immediately after the ASILE conference, also to be held at the University of Sydney.

The ICOC is a multi-disciplinary conference which provides a forum for the presentation of new and innovative work on Indonesia with particular emphasis on encouraging engagement between newer Indonesianists and established scholars. It attracts participants from all over Australia and many other parts of the world.

There is no registration fee for the conference.
The Indonesia Council Open Conference has no funding available to assist participants. Please consult with your university to find out what funding options are available. Once you have registered for the conference we can provide you with a letter of confirmation that may assist you in securing funding.

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Australia's raiders of the lost wat

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14 Aug 2007 (The Canberra Times) – Unsurprisingly, the Canberra Times focuses more on the Australian archaeologists who worked on this project, however the map was a collaborative effort between Australian, French and Cambodian archaeologists.

REVEALED: Australia’s raiders of the lost wat

Australian archaeologists using complex radar and satellite technology to map the medieval city of Angkor have discovered more than 70 new temples scattered across a vast area of farmland and forests in north-west Cambodia.

University of Sydney archaeologist Damian Evans said, “It’s huge. We’ve mapped a massive settlement stretching well beyond the main temples of the World Heritage tourist area in Siem Reap.

“We’ve found the city was roughly five times bigger than previously thought.”

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Researchers map Angkor's ancient sprawl

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14 Aug 2007 (The Daily Telegraph) – The article also features a slideshow of images that you should also check out.

The Daily Telegraph, 14 Aug 2007

Researchers map Angkor’s ancient sprawl
By Roger Highfield, Science Editor

The largest urban sprawl on the planet in medieval times was in fact 10 times bigger than thought, rivalling the size of Greater London.

Carpeted today with vegetation, obscured by a cloak of low-lying cloud and raided by thieves, Angkor in Cambodia once thrived between the 9th and 16th centuries, reaching a peak of many hundreds of thousands of people in the 13th century

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Angkor "killed by climate change"

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14 March 2007 (News.com.au) – This isn’t exactly new news, because I posted something about this last year. Nonetheless, the story seems timely over the recent hype of climate change from Al Gore’s movie, An Inconvenient Truth.

City ‘killed by climate change’

Climate change was a key factor in the abandonment of Cambodia’s ancient city of Angkor, Australian archaeologists said today.

The city, home to more than 700,000 people and capital of the Khmer empire from about 900AD, was mysteriously abandoned about 500 years ago.

It has long been believed the Khmers deserted the city after a Thai army ransacked it, but University of Sydney archaeologists working at the site say a water crisis was the real reason it was left to crumble.

“It now appears the city was abandoned during the transition from the medieval warm period to the little ice age,” Associate Professor of Archaeology Roland Fletcher said.

Prof Fletcher said that to sustain a population of 750,000, the Khmers had a meticulously organised water management system.

But blockages found in two large structures that controlled the water system in central Angkor suggested the network had begun to break down late in the city’s history.

Prof Fletcher said the discoveries complemented previous field work that had led his team to conclude the city was abandoned when new monsoon patterns, brought about by climate change, had made the site unsustainable.


Related Books:
Uncovering Southeast Asia’s Past: Selected Papers from the 10th International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists by E. A. Bacus, I. Glover and V. C. Pigott (Eds)