Special Talk and Seminars on the Archaeology of Ban Chiang to commemorate 185 years of Thai-US diplomatic relations

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via The Nation, 27 September 2018: This talk happened just before IPPA last week.

On the occasion of the 185th Anniversary of Diplomatic Relations between Thailand and the United States, the Department of American and South Pacific Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Kingdom of Thailand, the Ban Chiang National Museum of the Department of Fine Arts, and the Department of Archaeology, Silpakorn University, in collaboration with the Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology (ISEAA), the United States of America, will organise activities to further promote Thai – US cooperation on the archaeology of Ban Chiang in Bangkok and UdonThani Province during 19 – 21 September 2018. Representatives from relevant government agencies, academics, students, professionals from tourism industry, media, and the general public are expected to attend.

Source: Special Talk and Seminars on the Archaeology of Ban Chiang to commemorate 185 years of Thai-US diplomatic relations

The legacy of the Ban Chiang discovery

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Burials at Ban Chiang. Source: The Isaan Record 20160420

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the Ban Chiang culture in Thailand’s Udon Thani province. This article from the Isaan Record features and interview with Dr Joyce White and her involvement with the site.

Burials at Ban Chiang. Source: The Isaan Record 20160420

Burials at Ban Chiang. Source: The Isaan Record 20160420

The legacy of Ban Chiang: Archaeologist Joyce White talks about Thailand’s most famous archaeological site
The Isaan Record, 20 April 2016

Fifty years ago in August, in the village of Ban Chiang near Udon Thani, a visiting American student named Stephen Young tripped over an exposed tree root and fell atop the rim of a clay pot partly buried in the village path. His tumble set into motion two joint Thai-American archaeological expeditions to Ban Chiang in the 1970s that exposed the extent of prehistoric burial sites beneath the village, sites filled with thousands of pieces of pottery and metalwork buried as grave goods by Neolithic and Bronze Age peoples at different times between 4200 and 1800 years ago. The Ban Chiang finds revealed unexpected technological and artistic development among the peoples of the region and challenged prevailing ideas about the prehistory of Southeast Asia.

American archaeologist Dr. Joyce White is the Director of the Ban Chiang project at the University of Pennsylvania Museum in Philadelphia, USA, where she has studied the finds from Ban Chiang since 1976. She is an expert witness for the US Department of Justice in an ongoing antiquities trafficking case that in 2014 resulted in the return of many smuggled Ban Chiang items to Thailand.

Full story here.

Thailand's rock art

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The Shumla (Studying Human Use of Materials, Land, and Art), a centre for rock art research based in Texas, recently made a trip to Thailand to see some of the rock art there. Rock art is one of the least understood pieces of material culture in Southeast Asia, and in this region is given a cursory, by-the-way mention in texts. Rock art in Thailand is clustered around the northeast and along the peninsula.

Southwest Texas Live, 21 Feb 2008

Shumla sends Texas to Thailand for rock art research
Southwest Texas live, 21 February 2008
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