[Paper] Newly discovered cave art sites from Bukit Bulan, Sumatra

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Black rock art from West Sumatra by Fauzi et al. 2019. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2019.01.001

via Journal of Archaeological Science, 22 January 2019: New rock art discovered in Sumatra, black drawings which are highly reminiscent of the rock art of the Lenggong Valley.

Until recently, the number and distribution of cave art sites in the western Indonesian Archipelago has been somewhat limited, hindering our knowledge of the character and development of cave art in the area. However, the recent discovery of seven new cave art sites in the karstic area of Bukit Bulan (Sumatra) provides an opportunity to augment current knowledge. Descriptive analyses performed on 84 cave art images from Bukit Bulan demonstrates their similarities with those found in the eastern part of Indonesia, including the similar depictions of humanlike (anthropomorphic) figures drawn in black. Our discoveries in Bukit Bulan not only corroborate the extensive distribution of cave art in the wider Indonesian Archipelago, but it also aligns Sumatra as the westernmost region of Indonesia into the discourse of prehistoric cave art in Indonesian prehistory.

Source: Newly discovered cave art sites from Bukit Bulan, Sumatra: Aligning prehistoric symbolic behavior in Indonesian prehistory – ScienceDirect

Penelitian Geoarkeologi Situs Pulau Sawah, Buktikan Masyarakat Dharmasraya Abad 8-13 M Sudah Maju dalam Penentuan Lokasi Permukiman

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‘We’ve found the missing 20,000 years’: crucial piece in human migration puzzle

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via Sydney Morning Herald, 20 August 2017: An interview with Dr Kira Westaway from the University of Wollonggong and the events leading to the paper about finding 65,000 year old human remains in Sumatra.

The discovery by Australian scientist Kira Westaway took treks through Indonesian rainforest, a dogged refusal to take no for an answer, and a fax machine.

Source: ‘We’ve found the missing 20,000 years’: crucial piece in human migration puzzle

Old teeth from a rediscovered cave show humans were in Indonesia more than 63,000 years ago

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Exciting new paper just published in Nature indicates evidence for humans in Sumatra as early as 63,000 years ago from a reinvestigation of remains at Lida Ajer cave. The findings and location of the site imply that humans were adept at rainforest exploitation from a very early period, and that perhaps the migration of early humans from Southeast Asia to Australia may not necessarily hugged the coastline as theorised.

Source: Old teeth from a rediscovered cave show humans were in Indonesia more than 63,000 years ago

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Talk: The emergence of state and cities in southeast Sumatra

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Readers in London may be interested in this upcoming talk by Dr Pierre-Yves Manguin at SOAS.

At the origins of Srivijaya: The emergence of state and cities in southeast Sumatra
Dr Pierre-Yves Manguin (Ecole française d’Extrême-Orient)

Date: 14 March 2017
Time: 5:15 PM
Source: 20170314 – Seminar – Pierre-Yves Manguin

Feature on Gua Harimau

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Gua Harimau in South Sumatra. Source: Jelajah 20150325

Jelajah.com carries a feature on the Neolithic site of Gua Harimau in South Sumatra. Even if you can’t read Indonesian, it’s worth a visit for the pictures – Gua Harimau is the only known painted rock art site on Sumatra, and it features a number of other prehistoric burials.

Gua Harimau in South Sumatra. Source: Jelajah 20150325

Gua Harimau in South Sumatra. Source: Jelajah 20150325

Keunikan Gua Harimau di Padang Bindu, Sumatera Selatan [Link no longer active]
Jelajah, 25 March 2015
Article is in Bahasa Indonesia

Dari kota Palembang di Sumatera Selatan rombongan kami bergerak ke baratdaya menuju kota Baturaja. Jarak tempuhnya sekitar 6 jam dengan menggunakan kendaraan beroda empat. Kali ini saya bergabung dengan rombongan para arkeolog dari kota Jakarta, Jambi dan Palembang untuk mengunjungi Gua Harimau di desa Padang Bindu, kecamatan Semidang Aji, kabupaten Baturaja.

Kami bermalam di kota Baturaja dan mulai melanjutkan perjalanan keesokan paginya. Hanya butuh 30 menit kami tiba di desa Padang Bindu, lokasi terdekat dari Gua Harimau. Kendaraan roda empat tak bisa masuk lebih jauh, rombongan harus berjalan kaki. Tapi sebelumnya kami sempatkan membeli makanan dan minuman untuk bekal selama di Gua Harimau. ”Tak ada warung di sana,” begitu kata Agus Sudaryadi, arkeolog asal Jambi, yang kebetulan sekamar dengan saya di hotel.

Gunungmegang Statue; Man and Elephant

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Harry Octavianus Sofian

Harry Octavianus Sofian

Harry Octavianus Sofian
Balai Arkeologi Palembang – Departemen Pendidikan Dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia
Gunungmegang statue is one of the site from Pasemah Megalithic Culture, located at the foot of the Mountain Dempo, Lahat Distric, South Sumatera Province – Indonesia. Pasemah megalithic culture is very unic, because the representation from the statue not stiff, but show dynamic activity,like Gunungmegang statue, show man holding the trunk of the elephant. This statue show us how the ancient people do domestication of wild elephants?

Public Lecture: Settlement Archaeology of Late 14th to 17th Century in West Sumatra

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Another upcoming lecture at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies by Dr Mai Lin Tjoa-Bonatz, on the archaeology of West Sumatra.

Settlement Archaeology of Late 14th to 17th Century in West Sumatra
Dr. Mai Lin Tjoa-Bonatz, Research Associate, Freie Universität Berlin
Date: Monday, 24 June 2013
Time: 10.30 am– 12.00 nn
Venue: ISEAS Seminar Room II
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University of Wollongong to help work on Sumatra cave excavations

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The Indonesian National Research and Development Center for Archaeology and University of Wollongong’s Centre for Archaeological Science will collaborate on the Gua Harimau site in Sumatra.

Art, bodies found in ancient caves
Illawara Mercury, 11 April 2013
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Muaro Jambi complex at risk from development

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The Muaro Jambi complex is a cluster of Buddhist ruins dating to the 7th century, a major site of Buddhist scholarship in its day. Today, the surrounding region is being developed for heavy industry and it seems like the local government is unwilling to grant the site protected status.

A Lost Island and Temples of Doom as Jambi Trades Away Its Valuable History
Jakarta Globe, 08 March 2012
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