A look at the finds from Nanhai No. 1

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Finds from Nanhai No. 1. Source: CRI English 20150131

Some images from the Nanhai No. 1 wreck recovered from the South China Sea.

Finds from Nanhai No. 1. Source: CRI English 20150131

Finds from Nanhai No. 1. Source: CRI English 20150131

Over 60,000 Song Porcelains Discovered in S.China Sea
CRI English.com, 31 January 2015

Photo taken on Jan. 28, 2015 shows artifacts discovered on the Nanhai (South China Sea) No. 1 ship at the “Crystal Palace” at the Marine Silk Road Museum in Yangjiang, south China’s Guangdong Province. After seven years of excavation, more than 60,000 porcelain artifacts from the Song Dynasty (960-1279) have been discovered on the ship, which had lain undersea for more than 800 years and was put into protection in the Marine Silk Road Museum after its salvage in 2007. [Photo: Xinhua/Liu Dawei]

More images here.

Preserving Hong Kong’s subway archaeological sites will cost up to $700,000 more

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Source: South China Morning Post 20141121

But it looks like the government is leaning towards the cheapest option, which is to move the wells to another place.

Source: South China Morning Post 20141121

Source: South China Morning Post 20141121

Medieval well may be moved from To Kwa Wan station construction site
South China Morning Post, 23 November 2014

Saving ancient wells: money down the drain? [Link no longer active]
The Standard, 21 November 2014

MTR redesign in HK$4.1 billion plan to display relics at rail link
South China Morning Post, 21 November 2014

Let’s be less dogmatic on relics in Hong Kong
South China Morning Post, 21 November 2014
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NSC Working Paper: Maritime Southeast Asia: The View from Tang–Song China

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Maritime Southeast Asia: The View from Tang–Song China. Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre

A new working paper from the e Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre of the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore.

Maritime Southeast Asia: The View  from Tang–Song China. Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre

Maritime Southeast Asia: The View from Tang–Song China. Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre

Maritime Southeast Asia: The View from Tang–Song China
Geoffrey Goble
Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre, Working Paper No 16 (May 2014),

Hong Kong MTR excavations could reveal Song Dynasty past

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Excavation of wells in Hong Kong MTR sites. Source: South China Morning Post, 20140602

The remains of buildings found in Hong Kong during the construction of the MTR lines may hint at links to the Song Dynasty. There is some concern that not enough is being done to preserve these archaeological remains.

Excavation of wells in Hong Kong MTR sites. Source: South China Morning Post, 20140602

Excavation of wells in Hong Kong MTR sites. Source: South China Morning Post, 20140602

Antiquities Board urges MTR to protect ancient relics
The Standard, 29 May 2014

Excavation at MTR site could help prove Song dynasty’s links to Hong Kong
South China Morning Post, 02 June 2014
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Fate of Song Dynasty finds in Hong Kong still in the air

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Source: South China Morning Post, 20140516

The lead archaeologist of the excavation at the Sha Tin rail link excavation in Hong Kong stops short of giving a recommendation on the final fate of the Song Dynasty finds.

Source: South China Morning Post, 20140516

Source: South China Morning Post, 20140516

Fate of relics and Sha Tin rail link left open
South China Morning Post, 16 May 2014
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Debate over Song Dynasty finds along Hong Kong subway line

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The archaeological finds dating to the Song Dynasty found while building an MTR station in Hong Kong has delayed construction, and archaeology groups are raising the possibility of an archaeological museum to be integrated into the station.

Hong Kong MTR station to be turned into an archaeological museum?
China Topix, 06 May 2014

Archaeological works closely scrutinised
News.gov.hk, 02 May 2014

Maritime museum allows archaeologists to work and visitors to admire at the same time

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The Beijing Review has an article about the ongoing excavations at the Nanhai No. 1 wreck, recovered off the coast of China’s Guangdong province. The amazing aspect of this shipwreck recovery is that the entire shipwreck, silt and all, was relocated to a purpose-built museum which allows archaeologists to work on recovering finds and visitors to watch at the same time.

Treasures From a Watery Grave
Beijing Review, 22 October 2009
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13th century Shipwreck recovered from the South China Sea

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A 13th century shipwreck laden with Song Dynasty porcelain was recovered from the depths of the South China Sea last week – ships like these were common in the international trade that plied the maritime silk route between China and West Asia, and they all moved through Southeast Asia.

Sunken Merchant Boat Raised from the Sea
Xinhua, 22 Dec 2007

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