Apsara Authority looks to relocate Preah Pithu temple vendors

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Preah Ptihu by S-F / Shutterstock

via Khmer Times, 20 November 2018: Preah Pithu is a group of temples in the northern area of Angkor Thom.

Preah Ptihu by S-F / Shutterstock

Preah Ptihu by S-F / Shutterstock

The Apsara Authority has formed a committee tasked with relocating vendors and parking spaces around Preah Pithu temple in order to restore public order in the area.

The Apsara Authority on Friday held a meeting over the matter and formed the committee while discussing a solution to a growing number of vendors and visitors at the temple in Angkor Thom, northeast of the Bayon temple in front of Tep Pranam.

Sok Sangvar, deputy director-general of the Apsara Authority, yesterday said that a growing number of vendors and visitors, who park archaically, have led to public disorder around the temple.

Source: Apsara Authority looks to relocate Preah Pithu temple vendors – Khmer Times

Categories: Angkor Cambodia

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Unesco listing for Phnom Kulen spells unease for residents

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Communities on Phnom Kulen. Source: Phnom Penh Post 20160705

A recent announcement to include Phnom Kulen in the Angkor World Heritage property means an uncertain future for the some 300 people who live on the mountain.

Communities on Phnom Kulen. Source: Phnom Penh Post 20160705

Communities on Phnom Kulen. Source: Phnom Penh Post 20160705

UNESCO push will clear villagers off of Kulen Mountain
Phnom Penh Post, 05 July 2016

Hundreds of villagers living on Siem Reap’s historic Phnom Kulen are reeling after the government announced they would be relocated as part of a scheme to secure a UNESCO World Heritage Listing for the site.

Poung Lyna, the head of the Siem Reap environment department, yesterday confirmed the news villagers received over the weekend. “About 300 families, most of which are army and newcomers’ families who live near the Preah Ang Thom area on Kulen Mountain, will be relocated to a new place soon as their presence is affecting the environment of the national park,” Lyna said.

However, he added that those who had “lived there a long time” – upwards of 20 years – would not be moved. But uncertainty shrouds the ministry’s plans, with Lyna admitting he did not know when the villagers would be moved, or to where. However, he claimed it would be near their former homes.

“They will maybe be moved to the foot of the mountain, and we might give them a piece of land larger than what they currently have,” he said, making no mention of monetary compensation. “We will move their houses, but we will keep their businesses on the mountain untouched.”

Full story here.