Speed review: Archaeology news from the last two weeks

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Between the Christmas and New Year celebrations, and my two weeks at the field, I didn’t have the time to cover any of the archaeology news that has surfaced in the last three weeks. In Wednesday Rojak style, here’s the quick summary of what’s been happening in Southeast Asia over the last three weeks: Skeletal remains in Malaysia, Digital Reconstruction in Cambodia, Restoration works in Vietnam and a Construction Mess in Indonesia.

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Wednesday Rojak #42

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It’s almost been a month since the last Wednesday Rojak, and that’s because I’ve been traveling quite heavily for the last three weeks because of the term break and some family matters. On the flip side, it also means that I’ve amassed a few stories for this week’s very belated edition of rojak! Beside visiting Borobudur and Angkor, we also have a closer look at some of the sites in the Philippines.

Fort San Pedro
photo credit: thumbbook
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Philippine tunnel workers get heritage training

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Tunnel workers working under Plaza Independencia in Cebu City will undergo heritage training to recognise and preserve pre-hispanic artefacts they might come across while digging. The move by the National Museum is to help prevent further looting from the site.

Heritage training for tunnel workers
Cebu Daily News, 28 September 2008
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Taking Risks

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29 June 2006 (Cebu Daily News) – A commentary with mention of an archaeological dig just wrapping up at Plaza Independencia, with pre-hispanic finds of burials and Chinese ceramics.

Taking Risks

Before I proceed, however, let me invite the readers to the important work carried out by the National Museum (NM) at Plaza Independencia, where archaeological excavations are about to wrap up. Back-filling of the 12 or so 4×4 meter units (quite awesome by archaeological standards) will end today with some 4,000 sacks of excavated soil. The excavations began on June 6 as a prerequisite for the construction of a subway to connect to the South Coastal Road. All told, 11 burials were unearthed, aside from over a thousand Asian tradeware ceramic sherds (probably from the Ming dynasty, 14th to 16th centuries), as well as local earthenware, colonial-period bricks, clay pipes, wine bottles, and a jumble of cow, carabao, pig, and deer bones.