Rules for commercial photography in Angkor

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Source: Cambodia Daily 20151202

The Cambodia Daily article states the rules as new, but in reality they have been long-standing rules which state that commercial photography in Angkor must require a permit.

Source: Cambodia Daily 20151202

Source: Cambodia Daily 20151202

Government Imposes New Rules for Photos in Angkor Park
Cambodia Daily, 02 December 2015

Camera-wielding visitors to the iconic temples of the Angkor Archaeological Park in Siem Reap province will have to take extra care before clicking away now that the government has imposed new rules—effective immediately—for anyone aiming to make money off of their images.

As of December 1, all company representatives and journalists who want to take photographs inside the sprawling park, as well as tourists planning to profit from their photos or videos, must secure advance permission by filling out an application at the headquarters of the Apsara Authority, the government body that manages the World Heritage Site.

Full story here.

Categories: Angkor Cambodia

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Calling for Archaeology Photo Contributions!

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A mould of a Buddha head at Poueng Komnou, Cambodia

And now for something fun and different! Do you have an awesome archaeology-related photo that you’d like to share? This is a call for contributions for the first-ever Southeast Asian Archaeology Photo Exhibition, to be hosted on this site. Archaeology is a very visual field and the subjects come in all shapes and sizes. Certainly from my fieldwork I’ve got tons of snaps of sites, artefacts and figures and I’m sure many of you do too. I’m inviting you to share one (just one) photograph showcasing your favourite archaeological site, ongoing archaeological work, recent discoveries, or a brilliant photograph that your friends really ‘liked’ on Facebook. This is a first attempt at a curating a crowdsourced photography exhibition, and I’ll have the entries up next month. Details on how to contribute after the jump!

A mould of a Buddha head at Poueng Komnou, Cambodia

A mould of a Buddha head at Poueng Komnou, Cambodia

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Raising local appreciation of heritage sites through photography

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Citadel of the Ho Dynasty. Source: Viet Nam News 20140609

Despite the earlier troubles reported about local tensions at the Ho Citadel site, there is also another project to help raise appreciation of the local heritage through photography by letting locals document their lives in the world heritage site.

Citadel of the Ho Dynasty. Source: Viet Nam News 20140609

Citadel of the Ho Dynasty. Source: Viet Nam News 20140609

Ho Citadel residents to play part in preservation
Viet Nam News, 09 June 2014
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Introducing the archaeograph

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I mentioned working on another web project. Over the past couple of years I’ve been thinking more and more about the craft of photography in the practice of archaeology. Mostly because I work with rock art where digital photography has become the most common (and sometimes the only) way of recording them. So I’ve set up a thinking space for archaeological photography, and thus, the Archaeograph:

www.archaeograph.com

This blog has a decidedly more tech and geek slant to it, talking about equipment, techniques and photographic experiments. Check it out, and if you’re so inclined, subscribe to it.

Hmmm… Eventually I’ll have to fit writing a thesis in between of all this!

Kite aerial photography mixes work, play

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27 March 2007 (Jakarta Post) – Not related to the archaeology of Indonesia, but this feature on the use of kites for photography presents a low-cost option for creating aerial photographs for archaeological applications. I haven’t heard of any major use of aerial photography for archaeology in Southeast Asia – yet.

Kite aerial photography mixes work, play

Flying kites as a hobby often implies child’s play, which is not too far off the mark. But rather than a mere pastime, kites also help in research and public service work — at least for Anshori Djausal, 55. His hobby has contributed much to aerial mapping.

Known as a pioneer of kite aerial photography in Indonesia, Anshori has been engaged in this activity since the 1990s, which has also taken him to several European and Asian countries to follow international kite festivals.

But he relishes his happiest moments as those through which his aerial photo experiments served research and mapping in Indonesia, aside from tourism development.

Aerial photography has typically utilized hot-air balloons, planes, helicopters and satellites. Kite aerial photography has become an alternative today because it is more practical and far less expensive than the use of aircraft or helicopters.

Today, kite aerial photography is an alternative method used in geographical mapping, planning and surveys, and through which data collection can be conducted easily, effectively and efficiently.

A 2-by-15 meter kite can be used for photographing with a pocket camera at a height of 100 meters and over and at wind speeds of 15-30 mph.