Orang asli barricades taken down, leaving forest open to logging

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Forestry Deparment Officer dismantle a Kalge blockade in the Gua Musang forests at Kuala Betis, Gua Musang Kelantan on August 27,2018.The Malaysian Insight/Afif Abd Halim

via The Malaysian Insight, 28 August 2018: Orang Asli (the original native peoples of Malaysia) in Kelantan lose a legal battle over recognition of traditional land rights, which will pave the way for logging and the destruction of the Orang Asli’s source of food.

Forestry Deparment Officer dismantle a Kalge blockade in the Gua Musang forests at Kuala Betis, Gua Musang Kelantan on August 27,2018.The Malaysian Insight/Afif Abd Halim

Forestry Deparment Officer dismantle a Kalge blockade in the Gua Musang forests at Kuala Betis, Gua Musang Kelantan on August 27,2018.The Malaysian Insight/Afif Abd Halim

As the nation counts down to Merdeka, the Orang Asli in Gua Musang do not feel like they are equal citizens despite being the oldest residents of the land that is now called Malaysia.

This is because their claims to tribal lands that they have used for generations are still not recognised by the Kelantan government.

Yesterday, they were dealt another blow to that fight for their rights when the blockades they erected to protect their land claims were destroyed by state government agencies.

After being up for close to eight months, the barricades they built and maintained were dismantled as they watched on with silent tears and heavy hearts.

Now, there is nothing to prevent plantations companies and loggers from entering and further destroying the communal jungles they have depended on for generations for sustenance.

Source: Tears of tribal land | The Malaysian Insight

Language previously unknown to linguists discovered in Southeast Asia

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via Science Direct, 06 February 2018:

A language previously unknown to linguists — dubbed Jedek — has been found in the Malay Peninsula, researchers from Sweden report. The community in which Jedek is spoken is more gender-equal than Western societies, there is almost no interpersonal violence, they consciously encourage their children not to compete, and there are no laws or courts, according to the researchers.

Source: Language previously unknown to linguists discovered in Southeast Asia

Orang Asli museum gets $4 million boost

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Orang Asli (‘original people’) refer to the small aborginal population who live in the hinterland of Malaysia. In Peninsular Malaysia, the three main groups of Orang Asli are the proto-Malays, the Semang (negritos) and the Senoi. They represent a very small part of the population, and the development of Malaysia in the last few decades have led to the encroachment of land in their grounds.

Govt allocates RM4m for orang asli museum
The Star, 20 Feb 2008
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