Bringing back the forgotten palace

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via Bangkok Post, 12 June 2018: Wang Na, or the Front Palace, is more commonly known as the National Museum in Bangkok.

While the Grand Palace is world famous for its palatial architecture, the old Front Palace, or Wang Na, of ancient viceroys is hidden in obscurity although its beauty is second to none. Today it is just known simply as the National Museum Bangkok, rather than a palace with deep historical and artistic significance.

Source: Bringing back the forgotten palace

Inspired by India

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via Bangkok Post, 1 March 2018: An exhibition celebrating diplomatic relations between India and Thailand at the National Museum in Bangkok.

A visit to a temporary exhibition at the National Museum Bangkok at the former Front Palace near Sanam Luang is a good way for tourists to explore India, Thailand and some other Southeast Asian countries through Buddhist art. The ongoing exhibit entitled “Buddhist Imagery From Bharata To Suvarnabhumi” celebrates the 70th anniversary of diplomatic ties between Thailand and India and the 25th anniversary of the Asean-India relationship.

Source: Inspired by India

The sacred feminine in Thailand

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Goddesses exhibition at the National Museum of Bangkok. Source: Bangkok Post 20150527

The National Museum in Bangkok is having a special exhibition featuring female deities from various religions in Thailand: Buddhism, Hinduism and indigenous cults.

Goddesses exhibition at the National Museum of Bangkok. Source: Bangkok Post 20150527

Goddesses exhibition at the National Museum of Bangkok. Source: Bangkok Post 20150527

The feminine divine
Bangkok Post, 27 May 2015

To celebrate the 60th birthday of HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn, the Fine Arts Department is hosting a special exhibition, “Feminine Deities: Buddhism, Hinduism And Indigenous Cults In Thailand”, at the National Museum Bangkok. The objective is to disseminate knowledge about faith and beliefs relating to women in Thailand through the ages via religious sculptures.

The exhibition is divided into four parts — Goddesses: Traditional Beliefs From The Past; Goddesses In Brahmanism-Hinduism: The Supreme Power Of Females; Female Deities In Buddhism: The Power Of Intellect; and Goddesses In Traditional Beliefs: The Power Of Nature.

The first section shows that people have believed in the existence of goddesses since prehistoric times. Goddesses are believed to have supernatural powers, which allow them to control aspects of nature. Accordingly, people believe that they can indirectly influence nature by worshipping goddesses. The Mother Goddess or Earth Goddess is believed to be responsible for the fertility of women and their natural mothering instincts. Sculptures of women produced by ancient civilisations in Europe, Asia, America and Africa provide evidence of the widespread belief in the power of goddesses and the high status of women at that time. Their most notable features are their large hips (signifying the ability to give birth) and breasts (signifying the ability to nurture). Even in the present day, goddesses are still widely worshipped by followers of certain religions.

Full story here.

Repatriated Ban Chiang artefacts exhibited in Bangkok

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Classic Ban Chiang Pottery

Recently-repatriated artefacts from the United States are on display at the National Museum in Bangkok. They were returned from the Bowers Museum in California last year after being determined that they came from looted contexts. A total of 554 pieces were returned, and an opening ceremony yesterday started off the exhibition that will carry on for the rest of the month.

The Ban Chiang exhibition at the Bangkok National Museum

The Ban Chiang exhibition at the Bangkok National Museum

Moulds and crucibles for bronze metalworking

Moulds and crucibles for bronze metalworking

Bronze artefacts, spear points and bracelets, some with the bones still inside.

Bronze artefacts, spear points and bracelets, some with the bones still inside. These appear to be similar to ones repatriated to Cambodia.

Beads

Beads

Possible paddle beaters with incised markings for creating patterns

Possible paddle beaters with incised markings for creating patterns

For this kids, a DIY rock art station!

For this kids, a DIY rock art station!

Classic Ban Chiang Pottery

Classic Ban Chiang Pottery

The Thai Minister for Culture, Director-General of the Fine Arts Department and a member from the US Embassy inspects the exhibition.

The Thai Minister for Culture, Director-General of the Fine Arts Department and a member from the US Embassy (?) inspects the exhibition.

The exhibition is on at the National Museum in Bangkok until 1 March 2015.

Symposium: 500 Years of Europeans in Siam

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The National Museum of Bangkok Volunteers is organising a symposium on 500 Years of Europeans in Siam on 24 February 2011. A list of speakers and registration information can be found on their website.

500 Years: Europeans in Siam
Date: 24 February 2011
Venue: National Theatre Bangkok

As the year 2011 marks 500 years since the arrival of the first Europeans in Siam, the National Museum Volunteers (NMV) will be celebrating this milestone occasion by holding a full day symposium at the National Theater Bangkok.

A host of distinguished Thai and European experts will be sharing their insights on the rich and multi-faceted relationship that has developed between Europe and Siam over the past half-millennium.

Tales of three different Southeast Asian museums

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Richard Bammer of the Reporter visits three Southeast Asian Museums – The Museum of Vietnamese History in Hanoi, The Angkor National Museum in Siem Reap, and the National Museum Bangkok and contrasts the state of artefacts there.

Tales of three different Southeast Asian museums
The Reporter, 18 February 2010
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Exhibition on Dvaravati opens at the Bangkok National Museum

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A new exhibition opened last week at the Bangkok National Museum – Dvaravati Art: The Early Buddhist Art of Thailand puts together over a hundred artefacts collected from 12 museums showcasing this kingdom that ruled over central Thailand between the 6th and 11th century.

Mon-Dvaravati Sculpture of seated Buddha, c. 8th century. From the Nei Xue Tang Museum.

Ancient masterpieces
Bangkok Post, 13 August 2009
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Getting a feel for museums – literally!

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This is a great story about how museums can facilitate better access to the public – the National Museum of Bangkok is working with other volunteer groups to facilitate tours where blind visitors can actually touch and feel the exhibits.

I was at the Bangkok National Museum and they certainly have a wealth of exhibits on display, from prehistoric Thailand to royal regalia. It’s great to know that blind visitors can now get a feel of some of these exhibits and discover these treasures for themselves.

Reaching Out
Bangkok Post, 15 April 2008
Link in Bangkok Post is no longer available
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