Ancient citadel found in Southern Vietnam

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10 Sep 2007 (Vietnam Net Bridge) – A 1,500-year-old citadel is found in the Southern Ba Ria-Vung Tau Province, possible of Cham origin.

Vietnam Net Bridge, 10 Sep 2007

Thousand-year-old citadel discovered in Ba Ria – Vung Tau

Ba Ria-Vung Tau General Museum and the Institute of Social Sciences – Southern Region have unearthed an ancient citadel dating back 1,400 to 1,600 years at Go Cat hamlet, Xuyen Moc district.

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Preserving ancient Angkor bridges

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30 August 2007 (The World Bank) – This story draws attention on an ancient highway between Siem Reap and a neighbouring province, and steps taken to preserve the ancient laterite bridges. Not that the bridges have been deteriorating – which should say something about the quality of the structures, but bypass routes and bridges should ensure that they will last for even longer.

World Bank, 30 Aug 2007

Cambodia: The Kampong Kdei Bypass on National Road No. 6

Following a route along an ancient Angkor highway dating from the 12th – 13th Century, National Road No. 6 (NR6) connects Siem Reap and Kompong Thom provinces.

Recent rehabilitation activities drew special attention to the need for Cambodia to protect these unique cultural assets from increasing vehicle and heavy traffic.

With a view to preserve the authenticity and historical value of the ancient bridges, the APSARA Authority for the Protection ad Management of Angkor and the Region of Siem Reap permitted the Ministry of Public Works and Transport to build 10 bypasses with new bridges around minor ancient bridges and a 1.3 km Kampong Kdei bypass and new bridge to divert traffic off the ancient bridges and onto the new bypasses, in conformity with UNESCO’s ad hoc expert group recommendations of December 2004.

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The Gold Coast: Suvannabhumi? Lower Myanmar Walled Sites of the First Millennium A.D.

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Spring 2007 (Asian Perspectives) – This year’s first edition of the journal Asian Perspectives has a paper on Burmese archaeology, focusing on three walled and moated sites. Asian Perspectives is a subscription-based journal; the abstract is featured in this post.

The Gold Coast: Suvannabhumi? Lower Myanmar Walled Sites of the First Millennium A.D.
Elizabeth Moore, San Win

The high rainfall of the Lower Myanmar coast is balanced by the aridity of the country’s inland plains. The article profiles three sites in a laterite-rich area located in the northern part of the Lower Myanmar peninsula. The walls and moats of these sites underline their role in water management, one where control of water was the decisive catalyst. The sites of Kyaikkatha, Kelasa, and Winka illustrate how slight changes in topography signal critical junctures, the points where walls and moats were constructed. As a result, up to seven walls flank the higher edges of these sites; these protected the interior by diverting excess water to lower areas. Using large finger-marked bricks and terra-cotta artifacts such as votive tablets, plaques, and architectural elements, a broad chronology of c. the sixth to ninth centuries A.D. is proposed, although a majority of the pieces dated to the seventh century A.D. Attention is also drawn to evidence of Lower Myanmar prehistoric habitation in lowland areas close to the coast, where natural and man-made changes continue to alter the ecology and affect archaeological interpretation. The survey is used to encourage comparative studies, drawing in environmentally diverse but culturally related areas of South and Southeast Asia.


Related Books:
Uncovering Southeast Asia’s Past: Selected Papers from the 10th International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists by E. A. Bacus, I. Glover and V. C. Pigott (Eds)