Ancient paintings found in Krabi cave

1 Comment

via The Nation, 07 June 2018: New rock art discovered in Southern Thailand – very exciting, and there seems to be some clear similarities with other rock art sites in the region which may indicate a local style.

More than 60 ancient paintings, thought to be around 3,000-5,000 years old, have been found at the Khao Pru Tee Mae cliff in Mount Chong Lom, Ao Luek, Krabi.

Source: Ancient paintings found in Krabi cave – The Nation

Krabi’s archaeological wonders

No Comments
Tha Phi Hua To, Krabi. Source: Bangkok Post 20150407

Thailand’s Krabi province is best known for its beaches, but this feature shows some of the other interesting prehistoric archaeological sites also present.

Tha Phi Hua To, Krabi. Source: Bangkok Post 20150407

Tha Phi Hua To, Krabi. Source: Bangkok Post 20150407

Krabi’s hidden wonder
Bangkok Post, 07 April 2015

Krabi’s reputation as a tourist destination on the Andaman coast needs no promotion. But apart from its famous beaches and islands, the province has several important archaeological sites, including the oldest site in Thailand and Asia, the Lang Rongrien Rockshelter. A recent Fine Arts Department trip to Krabi revealed the significance of these archaeological sites as well as man’s impact on them.

“The Lang Rongrien site was surveyed by Prof Douglas Anderson from Brown University in 1983-5. At 40,000 years old, it is the oldest site in Asia. Pieces of bones from the Neanderthals were found there,” said Praphid Phongmas, senior archaeologist. A number of objects, including three pedestaled pots, pottery, stone tools and animal bones, were also unearthed.

About 3km from the Lang Rongrien site is the Khao Na Wang Mi archaeological site on a range of limestone mountains. There is evidence of prehistoric humans here, with temporary shelters and graveyards 2,000-4,000 years old (New Stone Age) being found.

Full story here.

Archaeology Field School in Thailand

2 Comments
University of Washington Archaeology Field School

The University of Washington in conjunction with Silpakorn University and the Fine Arts Department of Thailand is organising a field school in Krabi, Thailand in July-August. The Field School is also open to non-University of Washington Students. For details see here (closing date 6 February 2015).

University of Washington Archaeology Field School

University of Washington Archaeology Field School

The rock art of Viking Cave

1 Comment
Tham Phrayanaga/Viking Cave

Stories by Alex is a video series featuring ancient civilisations around the world. In this episode, he visits Tham Phrayanaga or Viking Cave in southern Thailand, a rock art site with depictions of ships from many different cultures and highlights the vibrant maritime silk route in Southeast Asia. I have previously worked at this site before with Atthasit Sukkham, one of the people featured in this video. The Viking Cave is not normally open to public, so it’s a great way to see the site!

Tham Phrayanaga/Viking Cave

Tham Phrayanaga/Viking Cave

[youtube gBwmBCJzNJs]

World's oldest anthropoid fossil found in Krabi

No Comments

Not strictly an archaeology story, but readers with an interest in primate anthropoid fossils might be interested in this story. (8/1 update: Raymond notes that the terminology used in the article is wrong, and that it’s not so much a primate as much as an anthropoid.)

.

Oldest primate fossils found
Bangkok Post, 07 January 2010
Read More