Another Prasat Chen statue returned – Hanuman repatriated to Cambodia

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Returned Hanuman statue. Source: Cambodia Daily 20150513

It was a time for celebration for Cambodia last week when another statue from the Prasat Chen group in Koh Ker was returned to the country from the Cleveland Museum of Art, after it was established that the statue was illegally removed and therefore looted.

Returned Hanuman statue. Source: Cambodia Daily 20150513

Returned Hanuman statue. Source: Cambodia Daily 20150513

US Museum returns looted statue to Cambodia
AFP, via Yahoo News, 11 May 2015

US Museum Returns Hanuman Statue to Cambodia
Cambodia Daily, 11 May 2015

Cambodia welcomes home statue returned by Cleveland Museum of Art
AP, via the News Herald.com, 12 May 2015

Hanuman statue returned (video)
Phnom Penh Post, 13 May 2015

Looted statue comes home
Phnom Penh Post, 13 May 2015

Looted Statue Officially Returned to Cambodia
Cambodia Daily, 13 May 2015

Nearly five decades after a centuries-old statue of the Hindu monkey god Hanuman was looted from a temple in Cambodia, the Cleveland Museum of Art officially handed it over to the government Tuesday during a ceremony at the Council of Ministers building.

Once part of a depiction of an epic battle between two other monkey deities, the statue was carved in the 10th century and housed at Preah Vihear province’s Prasat Chen temple, which was built as part of the one-time Khmer Empire capital of Koh Ker.

Full story here.

Public Lecture: Koh Ker, the City of Linga during the Reign of King Jayavarman IV

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For readers in Phnom Penh, a lecture by Dr Chen Chenratana on the ancient city of Koh Ker.

Koh Ker, the City of Linga during the Reign of King Jayavarman IV
Chen Chenratana
Zaman University
21 March 2015, 9-11am
For online registration: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1YKRHe2QUEkqRhL2zenV7rf_W3O8Cd9DhH6j1xNAcuFc/viewform

In 10th Century Cambodia, King Jayavarman IV moved the capital city to Chok Gargyarin the greater Angkor area, now known as Koh Ker, where he was to stay for twenty years. It was there that Jayavarman IV built religious monuments dedicated to Hinduism as well as large scale infrastructure (i.e. irrigation system, roads) to support the local economy. The concept of urban planning was also developed fully during his reign since the capital was organized in such a way as to consolidate the king’s political power and ensure the country’s stability, security and prosperity.
This capital city lasted for 20 years, however. It was immediately abandoned after his death. Historians are still debating the underlying motivations behind Jayavarman IV’s choice of Koh Ker and the major political events that took place during his reign.

Three statues return to Cambodia

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Deputy Prime Minister Sok An and US diplomat Jeff Daigle welcoming the returning statues. Daily Mail 20140603

Cambodia celebrates the return of three statues that were looted from Koh Ker in the 1970s.

Deputy Prime Minister Sok An and US diplomat Jeff Daigle welcoming the returning statues. Daily Mail 20140603

Deputy Prime Minister Sok An and US diplomat Jeff Daigle welcoming the returning statues. Daily Mail 20140603

Welcome home! Three 1,000-year-old statues returned to Cambodia by the US after they were looted during the civil war
Daily Mail, 03 June 2014

Cambodia gets back looted 1,000-year-old statues
AP, via The Gulf Today, 04 June 2014

Looted statues returned to Cambodia
AFP, via the Bangkok Post, 04 June 2014
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Cleveland Museum says its Khmer statue not from Prasat Chen

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Hanuman statue at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Source: Cleveland.com 20140513

The Cleveland Museum of Art says that its own statue of Hanuman was not looted from Koh Ker, based on their inspection of the pedestals there.

Hanuman statue at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Source: Cleveland.com 20140513

Hanuman statue at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Source: Cleveland.com 20140513

Statue not coming back: US museum
Phnom Penh Post, 15 May 2014

The Cleveland Museum of Art says it has evidence that its Hanuman sculpture was not looted from Prasat Chen in Cambodia
Cleveland.com, 13 May 2014
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More statues returned to Cambodia from the US

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Statue of Bhima. Source: New York Times 20140506

Auction house Christie’s and the Norton Simon Museum have both agreed to return statues in their possession, ‘Pandava’ and ‘Bhima’ or a temple wrestler both originally thought to be from Prasat Chen, part of the Koh Ker complex.

Statue of Bhima. Source: New York Times 20140506

Statue of Bhima. Source: New York Times 20140506

More statues to be repatriated
Phnom Penh Post, 08 May 2014

Two More Looted Statues Set to Be Returned
Cambodia Daily, 08 May 2014

California museum to return statue to Cambodia
AP, via Salon.com, 08 May 2014

Ancient Angkor artefacts to be returned
AAP, via Yahoo News, 08 May 2014

Christie’s to Return Cambodian Statue
New York Times, 05 May 2014
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Koh Ker statue to return to Cambodia

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Koh Ker statue

via New York Times, 12 December 2013

Koh Ker statue

An ancient statue of a Hindu warrior, pulled from auction two years ago because of assertions that it had been looted from a temple deep in the jungles of Cambodia, will be returned to that country under an agreement signed on Thursday by Sotheby’s, its client and federal officials.

The accord ends a long bare-knuckled court battle over the Khmer treasure, a 10th-century statue valued at more than $2 million. The Belgian woman who had consigned it for sale in 2011 will receive no compensation for the statue from Cambodia, and Sotheby’s has expressed a willingness to pick up the cost of shipping the 500-pound sandstone antiquity to that country within the next 90 days.

Source: Disputed Statue to Be Returned to Cambodia | New York Times

The Met returns two Koh Ker statues

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art is set to return two statues from Koh Ker, after a review of their provenance. These two statues are not the same ones involved in the Sotheby’s auction, but the museum’s action sets an interesting precedent for other museums.

Kneeling Attendant from Koh Ker, The Metropolitan Museum of Art 20130503

Kneeling Attendant from Koh Ker, The Metropolitan Museum of Art 20130503

Metropolitan Museum of Art to Return Two Khmer Sculptures to Cambodia
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 03 May 2013
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