Historical relics found in Sleman

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19 January 2007 (Jakarta Post)

Historical relics found in Sleman

Historical relics were discovered Thursday in Palgading hamlet in Sinduharjo village, Sleman regency, by a resident.

The relics, which included a Buddha statue, were found by Muqorobin while he was digging. The findings were taken to Yogyakarta’s archaeological agency office.

“I was digging a hole for a septic tank in my backyard when I hit a hard object that I thought was ordinary stone,” Muqorobin said. “When I saw the statues I thought they must be of historical importance as many relics have previously been found in Palgading.”

Archaeological agency official Manggar Sariayuwati said it was estimated the relics dated back to an 8th or 9th century Buddhist kingdom.


Related Books:
Early Kingdoms of the Indonesian Archipelago and the Malay Peninsula by P. M. Munoz
Narrative Sculpture and Literary Traditions in South and Southeast Asia (Studies in Asian Art and Archaeology) by J. Fontein and M. J. Klokke (Eds)
The Buddhist World of Southeast Asia (Suny Series in Religion) by D. K. Swearer

Kota artifact part of old railway structure: Expert

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19 December 2006 (Jakarta Post) – Underground structure found in Old Jakarta might be part of an old Dutch railway structure.

Kota artifact part of old railway structure: Expert

An underground structure found by workers while digging a pedestrian tunnel in Jakarta’s Old Town district might have been part of the foundation for an old railway structure from the 19th century, a recent analysis reveals.

“We have compared old maps of the area and found that in the 1800s, there were three railway tracks intersecting at that point (where the structure was found),” tunnel project structural expert Josia Irwan Rastandi said.

The old map reveals that after the southern city fortress wall was demolished, the Dutch built two railway tracks running east to west and a tram track running north to south.

Gallery unveils the $4million Indonesian bronze statuette

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26 October 2006 (Sydney Morning Herald) – The National Gallery of Australia reveals its latest item in its collection, a 6th century bronze statuette of Indonesian origin. The article doesn’t describe the statuette’s provenance, but mentions that it was from the Javanese bronze age. This would put it around the time of the Srivijaya empire, although there is mention of an independent Bronze Age. Will have to go read that up.

Sydney Morning Herald, 26 Oct 2006

Gallery unveils the $4million woman

The diminutive sculpture depicts a woman nursing an infant while weaving on a foot-braced body tension loom.

Part of the myth surrounding the sculpture is the uncertainty about its age. It was believed to be too young to come from the Dong Son bronze-age culture that was centred on North Vietnam and ended in AD200, and it may have been from the Javanese Bronze Age, which peaked between the eighth and 14th centuries.

The gallery decided to have the clay core of the sculpture tested by thermo-luminescence.

The surprise result was that it was made between AD556 and 596.

Maxwell says archaeologists suggested there was an independent island bronze age in Indonesia about that time and there are several pieces in the National Gallery in Jakarta that are possibly from that period.


Related Books:
The Bronze Age of Southeast Asia (Cambridge World Archaeology) by C. Higham
The bronze-iron age of Indonesia (Verhandelingen van het Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land-en Volkenkunde) by H. R. van Heekeren

U.S. Navy halts planned dive of sunken ship near Indonesia

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13 Aug 2006 (Jakarta Post) – A group of volunteers have been prevented from photogaphing the remains of the sunken USS Houston off the waters of Indonesia.

U.S. Navy halts planned dive of sunken ship near Indonesia

The U.S. Navy has scuttled the plans of a sheriff to photograph the inside of the sunken USS Houston near Indonesia because of worries the wreck might be disturbed.

The association of sailors who survived the World War II sinking had commissioned the photos. A team led by Jerry Ranger, a lieutenant with the Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office in Florida and the son of a USS Houston surviving prisoner of war, had gone to the site in the Sunda Straits off Java.

The team included Dave Phillips of St. Louis County, Minnesota, who has experience using a remotely operated vehicle camera during his duties with the sheriff’s office and its volunteer rescue squad. He had planned to photograph the inside of the ship from Thursday through Wednesday.

A lesson from Bandung Bondowoso

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9 June 2006 (Jakarta Post) – Report on the damage cause by the earthquake at the Prambanan temple.

A lesson from Bandung Bondowoso

Sojiwan Temple, also located in the part of the Prambanan compound that belongs to Central Java province, is in an even worse condition. The body of the temple, which was actually undergoing reconstruction, has collapsed.

“In fact, the temple stones had been collected since 1950 and the renovation of the temple had been going on since 1992,” said Guritno of the Central Java Center for Archaeological Conservation and Heritage (BP3).It is really tragic because within just 57 seconds all these historical buildings were brought to the verge of collapse and may well vanish into the abyss of history if nothing is done to fix the damage.

UNESCO to help rehabilitate temples damaged by quake

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7 June 2006 (Antara News)

UNESCO to help rehabilitate temples damaged by quake

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation has expressed its pledge to help fund rehabilitation of several ancient temples damaged in a massive earthquake hitting Yogyakarta and Central Java last May 27.


Related Books:
Prambanan by S. Jhonny
Prambanan by Ariswari

Who will save the Bojonegoro barge?

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2 June 2006 (Jakarta Post) – An unidentified boat, accidentally discovered last year, is in danger of disintegration. Appeal to readers who can help to email Duncan Graham at wordstars@hotmail.com

Who will save the Bojonegoro barge?

… a well-preserved broad-beamed 25-meter barge. The design was strange — local boats are narrow and less than half that length.

It seems the barge was oar-powered, with benches for rowers and ports for rowlocks.

On the planked sides are wave-like motifs and a diagram of an arrow on a stick. On an internal timber a mark has been transcribed as 1612.

Locals convinced of the barge’s antiquity have linked it to the Singosari kingdom of 700 years ago. Others claim it’s a royal Thai barge because someone has said the teak used can be found only in Thailand and Kalimantan.

UNESCO offers help on quake-hit heritage sites

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31 May 2006 (Antara News)

UNESCO offers help on quake-hit heritage sites

UNESCO, the UN’s culture and science organisation, offered Tuesday to help assess and repair damage caused to World Heritage Sites in Indonesia by an earthquake that left nearly 6,000 dead.

The island of Java is home to three of the seven UNSECO heritage sites located in Indonesia.


Related Books
Some architectural design principles of temples in Java: A study through the buildings projection on the reliefs of Borobudur Temple by P. Atmadi

Quake takes toll on historical sites

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28 May 2006 (Jakarta Post)

Quake takes toll on historical sites

Archaeologists surveying the Prambanan Temple complex in Yogyakarta hours after Saturday’s devastating earthquake found extensive damage to the ancient site.

Stone blocks and statues lay scattered about the ground; decades of patient restoration work undone in less than a minute.

“Our initial survey of the site found wreckage at the Siwa, Wisnu and Brahma temples, as well as at several minor temples,” Yogyakarta Archaeological Conservation Agency head Agus Waluyo told The Jakarta Post on Saturday.


Related Books
Some architectural design principles of temples in Java: A study through the buildings projection on the reliefs of Borobudur Temple by P. Atmadi

Java Man's First Tools

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21 Apr 2006 (Science) -Preliminary report on new findings on the Java Man that will put associated tool findings as one of the oldest outside of Africa.

Java Man’s First Tools

In 1998, Widianto found stone flakes in the 800,000-year-old Grenzbank layer at Sangiran, whose well-plumbed sediments reach back 2 million years. Then in September 2004, his team struck gold in a layer dated by extrapolation from the rocks around it to 1.2 million years ago. Over 2 months, they unearthed 220 flakes–several centimeters long, primarily made of chalcedony, and ranging in color from beige to blood red–in a 3-by-3-meter section of sand deposited by an ancient river.


Related Books:
Java Man by G. H. Curtis
Java Man by R. Levin, G. H. Curtis, C. Swisher
Java Man: How Two Geologists Changed Our Understanding of Human Evolution by R. Levin, G. H. Curtis, C. Swisher