Airborne LiDAR prospection at Lovea, an Iron Age moated settlement in central Cambodia

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Besides the paper on stone tools of Vietnam, another paper (also by other former colleagues at the Australian National University) presents Lidar data from the iron-age settlement of Lovea in Cambodia.

Recent archaeological investigations and technological applications have increased our appreciation of the intricacies of pre-Angkorian societal development. The results reveal a transformative period characterised by increasing socio-political complexity, exchange and technological transfer, differences in burial wealth, growing levels of conflict and variation in site morphology. Among the excavated Iron Age sites in Cambodia, Lovea, near the heart of Angkor, is well placed to provide a greater understanding of these changes in this region. Excavation and remote sensing confirm that the two moats surrounding Lovea are testimony to the early adoption of water-management strategies. These strategies grew in complexity, culminating in the vast network of canals, reservoirs and tanks that are the hallmarks of the hydraulic society of Angkor.

Source: Airborne LiDAR prospection at Lovea, an Iron Age moated settlement in central Cambodia | Antiquity | Cambridge Core

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A family of iron smiths who can trace their lineage 500 years

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The Jakarta Post features a family of iron smiths in Bali who have been practicing their craft for over 500 years.

Iron in their blood
Jakarta Post, 04 July 2013

“At the time our family arrived in Bali there was only the Bali Mula here — there were no cities at that time because kingdoms had not yet begun, so in a way our family helped in the establishment of the kingdom working as blacksmiths,” said Sunarta of the household utensils, farming implements and weapons crafted by his family that formed an integral element of developing settlements in Bali.

Iron work is so deeply ingrained into Sunarta’s being that he believes his smith’s tools and fire-breathing forge are continuations of himself, with different implements having a direct correlation with parts of his body.

Full story here.

Metal age burial site discovered in Myanmar

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Archaeologists have unearthed a large metal age cemetery, with at least 35 individuals, thought to be from the Bronze or Iron age in the Mandalay region of Myanmar.

Burial in Gyogon Village, Pyawbwe Township. Myanmar Times 20111212-18

Pre-Pyu era remains uncovered in Pyawbwe township
The Myanmar Times, 12-18 December 2011
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The Gold Coast: Suvannabhumi? Lower Myanmar Walled Sites of the First Millennium A.D.

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Spring 2007 (Asian Perspectives) – This year’s first edition of the journal Asian Perspectives has a paper on Burmese archaeology, focusing on three walled and moated sites. Asian Perspectives is a subscription-based journal; the abstract is featured in this post.

The Gold Coast: Suvannabhumi? Lower Myanmar Walled Sites of the First Millennium A.D.
Elizabeth Moore, San Win

The high rainfall of the Lower Myanmar coast is balanced by the aridity of the country’s inland plains. The article profiles three sites in a laterite-rich area located in the northern part of the Lower Myanmar peninsula. The walls and moats of these sites underline their role in water management, one where control of water was the decisive catalyst. The sites of Kyaikkatha, Kelasa, and Winka illustrate how slight changes in topography signal critical junctures, the points where walls and moats were constructed. As a result, up to seven walls flank the higher edges of these sites; these protected the interior by diverting excess water to lower areas. Using large finger-marked bricks and terra-cotta artifacts such as votive tablets, plaques, and architectural elements, a broad chronology of c. the sixth to ninth centuries A.D. is proposed, although a majority of the pieces dated to the seventh century A.D. Attention is also drawn to evidence of Lower Myanmar prehistoric habitation in lowland areas close to the coast, where natural and man-made changes continue to alter the ecology and affect archaeological interpretation. The survey is used to encourage comparative studies, drawing in environmentally diverse but culturally related areas of South and Southeast Asia.


Related Books:
Uncovering Southeast Asia’s Past: Selected Papers from the 10th International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists by E. A. Bacus, I. Glover and V. C. Pigott (Eds)