Development of Regional Maritime Networks during the Early Metal Age in Northern Maluku Islands: A View from Excavated Glass Ornaments and Pottery Variation

No Comments

New paper by Ono et al. in the Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology

In this paper we discuss the results of excavation at the Aru Manara site in the Northern Maluku islands along with a description of the recovered pottery assemblage and results of compositional analysis of glass ornaments. By comparing our data to those from other sites in the area, we suggest the possible development of regional maritime networks in and around the Northern Maluku Islands during the Early Metal Age. The lowest level of the site contained a large number of secondary human burials, burial pots, and jars with distinctive anthropomorphic and zoomorphic motifs (including human faces and lizards), and possible baked clay ornaments. These all date to between ca. 2100 and 1900 years BP, corresponding to the Early Metal Age in Island Southeast Asia. The site also produced numerous glass beads and bracelets. X-ray fluorescence analysis confirms a high proportion of potash glass that possibly originated from China, Mainland Southeast Asia or India and is common in sites in Thailand and Vietnam dating to between 2500 and 2100 years BP. There was a minor occurrence of high alumina-soda glass beads known as Indo-Pacific beads that originated from India to Southeast Asia and which are commonly found in sites dated between 2300 and 1500 years BP or later. The glass ornaments from different areas, combined with variable pottery, indicates the possible development of maritime and cross-regional networks to the Northern Maluku Islands.

Source: Development of Regional Maritime Networks during the Early Metal Age in Northern Maluku Islands: A View from Excavated Glass Ornaments and Pottery Variation
https://doi.org/10.1080/15564894.2017.1395374

Categories: Ceramics Indonesia

Tags:

Champa glass artefacts found in central Vietnam

1 Comment

29 May 2007 (Nhan Dan and Thanh Nien News) – Never-before-found glass jewelery have been found in Central Vietnam, dating to the 9th and 10th centuries around the Champa period.

Ancient glass items unearthed in central Vietnam

A museum in Vietnam’s central Quang Binh province announced Tuesday it has found glass jewelry made during the Cham Civilization dating back over ten centuries ago.

The General Museum said the beads, bracelets, and other items were found in Le Thuy district’s Son Thuy commune.

Read more about the rare Champa glassware.

More books about glass jewelry and the archaeology of Vietnam:
Jewelry of Southeast Asia by A. Richter

Ancient pottery unearthed at My Son sanctuary

No Comments

11 April 2007 (Thanh Nien News) – Cham-style pottery is unearthed at the My Son sanctuary, a Hindu temple complex, one of which contains an inscription of an old Chinese character. This also marks the 300th post on this blog. Hooray!

Cham pottery

Ancient pottery unearthed at Vietnam World Heritage site

Italian and Vietnamese archeologists discovered Tuesday a red brick pottery piece thought to date back to the 18th century at a dig at Quang Nam province’s My Son Sanctuary. The archeologists, from Italy’s Lerici Foundation and Vietnamese Ministry of Culture and Information said the pottery surface was engraved with ancient Cham characters and an old Chinese character “Chen”. This is the third pottery piece that contains the “Chen” character found in My Son since 2005, along with over 2,000 ancient Cham objects including stone, glass and ceramics, among others.


Related Books:
Hindu-Buddhist Art Of Vietnam: Treasures From Champa by E. Guillon
The Art of Champa by J. Hubert

Police seize long lost Islamic treasures of the Java Sea

No Comments

22 May 2006 (The Telegraph) –

Police seize long lost Islamic treasures of the Java Sea

Unique historical treasures worth tens of millions of pounds were yesterday gathering dust in store rooms in Jakarta after being impounded by police.

The 250,000 pieces of Chinese ceramics and Arabic and Persian glassware were recovered from a 1,000-year-old wreck in the Java Sea off Indonesia. Found with them were 13,000 Indian pearls, jewellery, about 1,000 rubies and sapphires and several gold pieces.


Related Books
Shipwrecks and Sunken Treasure in Southeast Asia by T. Wells