SEAMEO SPAFA Archaeology Education Survey ends next week!

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SEAMEO SPAFA Archaelogy Education Survey

Have you filled up the SEAMEO SPAFA Survey on Archaeology Education in Southeast Asia yet? If you’ve been putting it off, you have only a few days left to get your opinions in.

SEAMEO SPAFA Archaelogy Education Survey

SEAMEO SPAFA Archaelogy Education Survey

This survey is part of my work for SEAMEO SPAFA, and we are looking to understand how and where archaeology is taught in the region, what kinds of skills training is needed, and where do students go after they get their degree. This is the first time a study of this kind has ever been undertaken in the region. So far we have received over 300 responses from Southeast Asia and beyond, and the survey will close on December 5 so if you haven’t taken it, please help me out and fill it up!

TAKE THE SURVEY HERE

Cambodia housed many universities during Angkor era

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via Phnom Penh Post, 25 July 2017: I think a caveat must be made about the different meaning of ‘education’ and ‘university’ during Angkorian times…

When thinking about the Angkor era, it is common for one to conjure up images of towering infrastructure structures, such as the temples of Angkor Wat. However, what is less knows is that the Khmer ancestors were also able to receive high levels of education during the Angkor Empire.

Source: Cambodia housed many universities during Angkor era, Post Plus, Phnom Penh Post

Categories: Angkor Cambodia

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Heritage education for kids

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Students learning at Banteay Chhmar. Source: Cambodia Daily 20160713

An article on Heritage Watch’s excellent school programmes in Cambodia, teaching schoolkids the value of heritage as an investment in the future protection of sites.

Students learning at Banteay Chhmar. Source: Cambodia Daily 20160713

Students learning at Banteay Chhmar. Source: Cambodia Daily 20160713

Children—A New Defense Against Looting?
Cambodia Daily, 13 July 2016

For years, archaeologists excavating pre-Angkorian sites in Banteay Meanchey province unsuccessfully attempted to stop the looting of the area’s temples and buried treasures.

Heritage Watch, a group created to protect the country’s archaeological and historical sites, determined that education was the remedy. So they trained villagers and monks living near the sites, as well as commune and community leaders, government officials and teachers.

Full story here.

Support the Gua Tambun Heritage Awareness Project!

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Gua Tambun rock art

Gua Tambun is the largest rock art site in Peninsular Malaysia, and one that I studied for my MA years ago. So I am mighty pleased to urged your support for the Gua Tambun Heritage Awareness Project, run by my colleague Dr Goh Hsiao Mei. (Disclaimer: I am not personally involved with project, but I support it 100%!)

Gua Tambun rock art

Gua Tambun rock art

Dr Goh is currently building a public archaeology and outreach programme to help raise awareness and appreciation for the Gua Tambun site in Ipoh, and to empower the people living near the site to help manage it from both a conservation and visitor management standpoint.

She is currently raising funds to develop and conduct school programmes and community workshops and at the time of writing she has met a third of the RM4,300 (about US 1,000) that she needs. You can contribute to her cause on her crowdfunding website, the Gua Tambun Heritage Awareness Project.

Cambodian-Laos programme in humanities research

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Source: The Cambodia Daily 20140825

Project Manusastra capacity building aim to develop local humanities research sounds like an excellent initiative, but it makes me wonder if training programmes like these teach Southeast Asians to think like westerners rather than to develop a local theory of our own. Does anybody have any experiences in the differences between ‘western’ archaeological theory and how different Southeast Asian groups think about archaeology?

Source: The Cambodia Daily 20140825

Source: The Cambodia Daily 20140825

University Program Cultivates Local Researchers
The Cambodian Daily, 25 August 2014
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PhD scholarship for RHX dating in Khmer stoneware

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For any potential PhD students looking for a project, there is a scholarship available at the University of New England in Australia to study rehydroxylation dating (RHX) as part of an Australian Research Council grant that studies the geochemistry and dates of Khmer stonewares and their kilns.

This is a full scholarship to the University of New England; applicants with geosciences background are especially encouraged to apply.

If you are interested, please contact:

Dr. PETER GRAVE
p.grave@une.edu.au
Associate Professor, Archaeology
School of Humanities
University of New England
Armidale, NSW 2351
Australia
+61 2 67 73 2062
http://www.une.edu.au/staff-profiles/pgrave

Cambodia's tourism fuelling education boom

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An interesting story on how the development of Siem Reap for tourists is also having a secondary effect in fuelling a desire by local Cambodians for higher education. For many, better education and qualifications means access to better-paying jobs, although the quality of such education is a concern.

Near Cambodia’s Temple Ruins, a Devotion to Learning
New York Times, 24 January 2012
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Categories: Cambodia Tourism

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