Call for Panels: 2nd SPAFA International Conference on Southeast Asian Archaeology

The call for panels is out! If you are interested in proposing a panel for #spafacon2016, you can do so on the conference website. Deadline for proposals is 30 September 2015

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Call for Papers: For the Love of Death

The Archaeological Studies Programme of the University of Philippines is organising a conference on Human Osteoarchaeology in Southeast Asia and the Pacific. Deadline for abstracts is this week! Read more on their Facebook page.

Love of Death Flyer

This two-day conference aims to create an opportunity for researchers to present and discuss their latest work on archaeological human remains assemblages from across Southeast Asia, the Pacific and beyond. It will be hosted by the Archaeology Studies Program, University of the Philippines – the first time a conference dedicated to human remains will be held in the Philippines. While the conference is focused on research in Southeast Asia, we welcome papers on topics from other geographical regions from which we may be able to draw parallels.

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Marc Oxenham, School of Archaeology and Anthropology, Australian National University

Papers are invited for inclusion in the following sessions:

Seen But Now Heard: The Osteoarchaeology of Juveniles
This session will discuss the latest research on juvenile remains in the archaeological record. Topics may include, but are not limited to, palaeopathology, mortuary practices and taphonomy.

Before They Died
This session will focus on the osteological evidence for lived lives. A wide range of topics, from diet and nutrition, occupation and demography, to isotopes and DNA are invited.

Nasty, Brutish and Short? Violence, Trauma, Health and Disease
This session will consider the quality of life experienced by past populations. Therefore, papers will present new research on topics including the evidence for health, disease, age at death and violence.

The Dying Game
This session is concerned with the osteological evidence for mortuary practices.

All In! Open Session
Any other papers on human osteoarchaeology that do not seem to find a home in any of the above sessions will be assigned to this session. This may include papers on new analytical techniques, theoretical approaches or new excavations.

Abstract Submission
Abstracts of no more than 200 words for a 20 minute paper should be sent to loveofdeath2016@gmail.com by August 7th 2015. We welcome papers from academics, commercial archaeologists, and post-graduate students alike. Abstracts for poster presentations will also be accepted.

India pivots eastwards to Southeast Asia

A conference was held last week in New Delhi on the cultural links between India and Southeast Asia with the aim of establishing research links between India and Southeast Asia.

India, Asean reconnect through ancient cultural linkages
Daijiworld.com, 23 July 2015

“Political security and economic cooperation must go hand in hand with the socio-cultural connection and people-to-people linkages,” he said.

Citing examples, he said that excavations have found evidence of Indian links in the first century AD in Myanmar in the city of Beikthano, also known as City of Vishnu. Coins, statues of Hindu deities, and statues of the Buddha have been found.

In central Thailand, evidence of Indian influence is found through Dvaravati form of representing the Buddha, in the 2nd century AD, which is derived from Indian Amaravati and Gupta styles, which were integrated with local art.

In Cham, in southern Vietnam, there is evidence of extensive influence of Indian culture, through many ancient Shiva temples.

Evidence has been found of extensive trade with the Southeast Asian countries from the Gupta dynasty in the 4th-6th century AD. Tamralipti, an ancient Indian city in the Bay of Bengal, was a busy centre of maritime trade, with ships travelling to the Malay peninsula, the Nicobar islands and to the Strait of Malacca.

Trade with the Asean is an important aspect of India’s links with the region, and India is its fourth largest trading partner, he said.

Full story here.

EurASEAA 15 kicks off

The 15th International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists kicked off this afternoon in Paris. If you’re on Twitter, you can follow bits of the conference using the hashtag #euraseaa15 (or just see the window below)


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Call for Papers: Fifth International Conference on Lao Studies

A conference on Lao studies will be held next year in Thammasat University in Bangkok. It has a fairly wide range of topics of interest. but several that might be of interest to archaeologists. Call for papers is open from now until end of October.

Fifth International Conference on Lao Studies: Lao PDR in the ASEAN Context
Venue: Thammasat University, Bangkok, Thailand
Date: 8-10 July 2015

The Faculty of Liberal Arts, Thammasat University and the Center for Lao Studies (CLS) are pleased to announce that the Fifth International Conference on Lao Studies (ICLS V) will be held from July 8 to 10, 2016 on the Tha Phrachan campus in Bangkok, Thailand. The main objective of the conference is to promote Lao studies, broadly defined, by providing an international forum for scholars to present and discuss various aspects of Lao Studies.

Theme
The theme of the Fifth International Conference on Lao Studies is “Lao PDR in the ASEAN Context,” with particular (though not exclusive) emphasis on the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC).

All Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) member states have committed to creating a region which is highly competitive, equitable in economic development and fully integrated into the global economy. The establishment of the AEC in 2015 will bring enormous opportunities as well as great challenges for the individual member countries in the region, especially for Lao PDR .

Suggested topics for the Fifth ICLS include, but are not limited to:

      The Faculty of Liberal Arts, Thammasat University and the Center for Lao Studies (CLS) are pleased to announce that the Fifth International Conference on Lao Studies (ICLS V) will be held from July 8 to 10, 2016 on the Tha Phrachan campus in Bangkok, Thailand. The main objective of the conference is to promote Lao studies, broadly defined, by providing an international forum for scholars to present and discuss various aspects of Lao Studies.

Theme

The theme of the Fifth International Conference on Lao Studies is “Lao PDR in the ASEAN Context,” with particular (though not exclusive) emphasis on the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC).

All Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) member states have committed to creating a region which is highly competitive, equitable in economic development and fully integrated into the global economy. The establishment of the AEC in 2015 will bring enormous opportunities as well as great challenges for the individual member countries in the region, especially for Lao PDR .

Suggested topics for the Fifth ICLS include, but are not limited to:

  • Laos’ trade integration within AEC
  • Special economic zones (SEZs)
  • Export survival
  • Roles of the private and public sectors
  • Human resources and effects on local employment
  • Migration
  • Infrastructure demands
  • Balancing development growth and environmental conservation
  • Tourism
  • Traditional knowledge and cultural expressions in economic development
  • Impacts on cultures and life ways
  • Lao language, culture, and history
  • Art, literature and music
  • Buddhism
  • Border Trade and culture
  •  Isan Regionalism
  • Architecture
  •  Education
  • Environment and Health
  • Rural Development
  • Other topics

Panel in honour of Dr Nishimura at the Asian Association of World History Congress

The Asian Association of World History Congress held in Singapore between 29-31 May will have a special panel entitled “The Ancient Studies in Vietnam from the view of integration of Archaeology and History” in honour of the late Dr. Nishimura.

Via Prof. John Miksic:

This panel will focus on Vietnam from the viewpoint of integration of archaeology and history. The late Dr. Nishimura realized that the framework of ancient studies advocated by the late Prof Mori Koichi, would be one of the principal axes of Area Studies.

One of his books, “Ancient Archaeological Studies in Vietnam” published in 2011 won a prize from the Japan Society for Southeast Asian History studies. Although his ultimate goal was the investigation of the “site” as an archaeologist, he integrated a lot of different methods of analysis.

After introducing the trajectory of Dr. Nishimura’s framework, we chose 4 topics from his fields of interest to discuss how his work continues to inspire current scholars. Two of the four topics recognize his strong interest in Vietnamese ceramics.

The first topic is Lung Khe citadel in Bac Ninh Province, in Northern Vietnam. New discoveries of a stone coffin and inscription support Dr. Nishiura’s hypothesis that Lung Khe citadel was not the Luy Lau and the Long Bien citadel(s). We also discuss the relationship with Funan and Oc Eo culture. Pham Le Huy, Le Thi Lien and Noriko Nishino will speak on this topic.

The second topic concerns the Champa Citadels in central Vietnam which will be presented by Do Truong Giang (Alex Giang), Mariko Yamagata, Nguyen Van Quang and Tomomi Suzuki.

The third topic is the 9th century shipwreck found off Quang Ngai province coast by 4 Japanese scholars (Noriko Nishino, Toru Aoyama, Jun Kimura, Nogami Takenori) and 1 Vietnamese underwater Archaeologist: Dr.Le Thi Lien.

The last topic to be discussed is the Kim Lan, Bat Trang pottery Village studies [in Hanoi]. This will be developed in the context of commercial activities in the 17th century and the influence of immigration.

Each topic will be discussed by at least 2 scholars: one historian and one archaeologist.

More details about the conference here.

CFP: Emergence of Theravada Buddhism in Cambodia: Southeast Asian Perspectives

SOAS is organising a symposium on Theravada Buddhism in Cambodia in July and the call for papers is now open. Bursaries for living and travel expenses are available to selected applicants. Deadline is 15 March 2015.

SOAS Emergence of Theravada Buddhism
SOAS Emergence of Theravada Buddhism

The Southeast Asian Art Academic Programme at SOAS invites papers for a symposium entitled ‘The Emergence of Theravada Buddhism in Cambodia: Southeast Asian Perspectives’ on July 3 2015.

Mainland Southeast Asia underwent major civilizational transitions when the Hindu-Mahayana Buddhist Angkorian Empire met its end over the 13th-15th centuries and Theravada Buddhism emerged in its wake. While Angkor remained a reference for the new states that developed across the mainland, Theravada Buddhism structured the cultural, social and political forms which continue to define the region. Given the importance of these changes, astonishingly little is understood about how it actually happened, notably in the Angkorian heartland itself. By supporting interdisciplinary exchange on the Theravadin material heritage across the Southeast Asian region (including Sri Lanka) during this transitional period, the symposium aims to begin to redress this gap in our regional understandings.

More details here.

CFP: 10th Postgraduate Forum on Southeast Asian Studies

Of potential interest to postgraduate students. The ARI Postgraduate forum has in the past had panels for Southeast Asian archaeology.

10th Singapore Graduate Forum on Southeast Asian Studies
Date: 24-26 June 2015
Venue: National University of Singapore, Bukit Timah Campus
Continue reading “CFP: 10th Postgraduate Forum on Southeast Asian Studies”

CFP: SEASREP 20th Anniversary Conference 2015

Readers may be interested in this conference, with some themes pertinent to archaeology.

Celebrating 20 Years of SEASREP and Southeast Asian Studies
University of Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
4-5 November 2015
Continue reading “CFP: SEASREP 20th Anniversary Conference 2015”

Stories from last week’s underwater archaeology conference in Vietnam

A couple of news stories arising from the underwater archaeology symposium in Quang Ngai city last week; one is about the symposium, while the other is about an associated exhibition at the Quang Ngai Museum featuring finds salvaged from the waters in the area.

The article about the conference quotes Prof Staniforth as saying that Vietnam needs a younger generation of underwater archaeologists to be trained, but I think the journalist missed the bigger point that he was trying to make. Prof. Staniforth also stressed that governments needed to be more committed in underwater archaeologists, in both the training, as well as in the legislative and enforcement frameworks for protecting underwater heritage. It is interesting to note that a number of the shipwreck finds from Vietnam are in the hands of private collectors now, being sold in markets like Singapore.

Underwater archaeology symposium in Quang Ngai City. Saigon: Vietnam Net 20141017
Underwater archaeology symposium in Quang Ngai City. Saigon: Vietnam Net 20141017

VN needs young underwater archaeologists
Vietnam Net, 17 October 2014

Quang Ngai boasts potential for underwater cultural heritage sites
Saigon Giai Phong, 17 October 2014
Continue reading “Stories from last week’s underwater archaeology conference in Vietnam”