Valuable artefacts found in Thua Thien-Hue

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19 September 2006 (VietNam Net Bridge)

Valuable artefacts found in Thua Thien-Hue

Archaeologists have discovered more than 10 common graves with many agate balls and other artefacts in the Con Dai archaeological site, Huong Chu commune, Huong Tra district, Thua Thien-Hue province.
According to the archaeologists, the newly excavated graves and artefacts at the site belong to the Sa Huynh culture which dates back over 2,000 year . They provide further evidence that an Early Metal Age culture once existed in Thua Thien-Hue.

Lung Leng: window to prehistoric time

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3 September 2006 (Viet Nam Net Bridge) – A larger feature on the Lung Leng archaeological site in the central highlands of Vietnam, with a larger range of photographs of the artefacts found there.

Viet Nam Net Bridge, 3 September 2006

Lung Leng: window to prehistoric time

Located on the left bank of the Po Co River, in Sa Binh Commune, Sa Thay District, Kon Tum Province, Lung Leng used to be a small gold mine. It was excavated in 1999 and 2001 on an area of 11,500 square meters and is one of Vietnam’s biggest-ever archaeological excavations.

In the second excavation archeologists found 20 relics with 14,552 stone objects, 224 pottery objects and 37 metal objects. 500 objects were sorted out into various collections of pottery, ornaments, Gong (cong chieng), alcohol jars, and ethnic costumes to be displayed in the HCM City Historical Museum. Many tools showing the indications of the Son Vi culture from the Paleolithic age were found in the Central Highlands for the first time.

Centuries-old coffins rotting at ancient burial site

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3 July 2006 (Viet Nam News) – Some 200 coffins, possibly dating to the early 8th century, risk becoming irrepairably damaged unless preservation actions are taken.

Centuries-old coffins rotting at ancient burial site

A cave containing 200 centuries-old wooden coffins in the northern province of Thanh Hoa may be irreparably damaged unless it is preserved soon by archaeologists, says a local official.

The cave is hidden in a dense forest near the top of a high rocky mountain at a spot where the Luong estuary merges into the Ma River in Hoi Xuan Commune, about 140 km away from Thanh Hoa City.

Taking Risks

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29 June 2006 (Cebu Daily News) – A commentary with mention of an archaeological dig just wrapping up at Plaza Independencia, with pre-hispanic finds of burials and Chinese ceramics.

Taking Risks

Before I proceed, however, let me invite the readers to the important work carried out by the National Museum (NM) at Plaza Independencia, where archaeological excavations are about to wrap up. Back-filling of the 12 or so 4×4 meter units (quite awesome by archaeological standards) will end today with some 4,000 sacks of excavated soil. The excavations began on June 6 as a prerequisite for the construction of a subway to connect to the South Coastal Road. All told, 11 burials were unearthed, aside from over a thousand Asian tradeware ceramic sherds (probably from the Ming dynasty, 14th to 16th centuries), as well as local earthenware, colonial-period bricks, clay pipes, wine bottles, and a jumble of cow, carabao, pig, and deer bones.