Feature on Dr Nancy Beavan

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Dr Nancy Beavan. Source: Asialife Cambodia 20151107

Cambodia AsiaLife features an interview with Dr Nancy Beavan (a personal friend of mine), who is behind the Living in the Shadow of Angkor exhibition at the National Museum of Cambodia.

Dr Nancy Beavan. Source: Asialife Cambodia 20151107

Dr Nancy Beavan. Source: Asialife Cambodia 20151107

Nancy Beavan
Asialife Cambodia, 07 November 2015

The new Living in the Shadow of Angkor exhibit reveals long-hidden secrets about Cambodia’s 15th to 17th century ethnic minorities, through their unique jar burial rituals.

Full story here.

Exhibition on the Jar Burials of Cambodia

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Burial jars and coffins exhibited at the National Museum in Phnom Penh

My friend Nancy Beavan organised an exhibition at the National Museum in Phnom Penh on her work investigating the jar burials of the Cardamom Mountains. It’s on for a few months, so be sure to check it out!

Burial jars and coffins exhibited at the National Museum in Phnom Penh

Burial jars and coffins exhibited at the National Museum in Phnom Penh

Cardamom Mountains: Body Jars and Cliff Coffins
Khmer Times, 30 September 2015

The remote and mysterious Cardamom Mountains are giving up some of their secrets – burial jars and wooden coffins – to the public as part of an exhibition that begins today at the National Museum.

After a decade researching the mysteries of the Cardamom Mountain people, Nancy Beavan, a senior research fellow at New Zealand’s University of Otago and an expert in radiocarbon dating, will be exhibiting her findings as part of the “Living in the Shadow of Angkor” project at the museum.

The project seeks to broaden the breadth of understanding of Cambodian history outside of the Angkor period.

The exhibit will be the first time the public can see how the immense project began. In a separate room in the museum, one can see the recreation of the hoard of burial jars and a dozen coffins hidden on a ledge in remote jungles of Cambodia – which have stayed secret for centuries.

Full story here.

The Jar Burials of the Cardamom Mountains

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Chhueng Kan and Tep Sokha working on the jar burial ledge, Phnom Khnang Peurng. Source: The Royal Society of New Zealand 20150911

The Royal Society of New Zealand has a feature and photo gallery on Dr Nancy Beavan’s (disclosure, friend of mine) work at the Cardamom Mountains, where she investigated a series of jar burials contemporaneous with Angkor.

Chhueng Kan and Tep Sokha working on the jar burial ledge, Phnom Khnang Peurng. Source: The Royal Society of New Zealand 20150911

Chhueng Kan and Tep Sokha working on the jar burial ledge, Phnom Khnang Peurng. Source: The Royal Society of New Zealand 20150911

In the Shadow of Angkor…
The Royal Society of New Zealand, 11 September 2015

The Highland Jar Burial site of Phnom Khnang Peung is the most extensive example of the unique Highland burial ritual that is being studied by Dr. Nancy Beavan from the Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, University of Otago, School of Medical Sciences with a 2013 Marsden Fund award. The 40+ Ayutthaya-sourced Mae Nam Noi burial jars – possibly obtained via previously unsuspected trade connections with nautical traders in the Gulf of Thailand – held a total of up to 152 individuals, representing the largest corpus of skeletal remains of any of the 10 known Jar Burial sites that have been discovered in the eastern ranges of the Cardamom Mountains of Cambodia.

Full story here.

Video: The Jar Burials of the Cardamom Mountains

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My colleague Nancy Beavan as been working for some time now at the Cardamom Mountains in western Cambodia, investigating a series of jar burial sites associated with a little-known culture who were living contemporaneously with Angkor. This news video from VOA Khmer is an overview of the project and the latest finds.

Ancient Cambodians Used Jars to Keep the Remains of the Dead
VOA Khmer, 02 March 2015
Video is in Khmer, but you can still understand what’s going on without knowing the language.

Jars in the Cardamom reveals a hidden people and history

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Burial jars in the Cardamom Mountains. Source: Phnom Penh Post 20150112

A couple of recent features on Nancy Beavan’s work in the Cardamom Mountains in Western Cambodia (disclosure: Nancy is a personal friend of mine). Stashes of burial jars found in at least 10 sites there reveal an unknown culture who lived in the highlands and had interactions with a declining Angkorian state. [Edit: Alison pointed out that the second article is from two years ago. My apologies, although I haven’t indexed it before so am leaving it here. Thanks Alison!]

Burial jars in the Cardamom Mountains. Source: Phnom Penh Post 20150112

Burial jars in the Cardamom Mountains. Source: Phnom Penh Post 20150112

Research Uncovers Clues to Burial Jar Mystery
Cambodia Daily, 08 January 2015

Mystery in the mountains
Phnom Penh Post, 12 January 2013
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Secondary jar burial discovered in Laos

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The Earth Times reports that the Middle Mekong Archaeological Project has discovered the first instance of a secondary burial in Laos. Read detail accounts of the recent fieldwork in Laos on the MMAP blog.

Secondary Burial from Tham An Mah. Image from the MMAP blog.

Iron Age discovery uncovers prehistoric burial customs in Laos
The Earth Times, 22 January 2009
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Speed review: Archaeology news from the last two weeks

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Between the Christmas and New Year celebrations, and my two weeks at the field, I didn’t have the time to cover any of the archaeology news that has surfaced in the last three weeks. In Wednesday Rojak style, here’s the quick summary of what’s been happening in Southeast Asia over the last three weeks: Skeletal remains in Malaysia, Digital Reconstruction in Cambodia, Restoration works in Vietnam and a Construction Mess in Indonesia.

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Wednesday Rojak #8

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It’s a bumper edition of Rojak this week, as we travel around the blogosphere to bring you another side of Indonesia, Cambodia and Laos. This week:

  • John Hawks comments on Julien Riel-Salvatore’s earlier article about the Hobbit’s tools (featured in Wednesday Rojak #6!)
  • Planetmole republishes an article by Suryatini N. Ganie about the ancient spice, Ginger.
  • Carl Parks wonders if the travel writer who wrote about Ta Prohm in the Guardian actually visit the ancient monastery in Great Writing, but did this guy actually visit Ta Prohm?
  • Visithra scales up and down the steps of the majestic Angkor Wat.
  • Chleong visits a different kind of Wat in Cambodia, a more recently built one called the Killing Fields Memorial.
  • Chris visits a lesser-known archaeological mystery in Laos, the Plain of Jars.

In this series of weekly rojaks (published on Wednesdays) I’ll feature other sites in the blogosphere that are of related to archaeology in Southeast Asia. Got a recommendation for the next Wednesday rojak? Email me!

Also, do drop by the SEAArch bookstore for a selection of books related to the archaeology of Southeast Asia!