Exhibitions showcases areca nut and betel leaf chewing in Vietnam

No Comments

A new exhibition at the Vietnam National History in Vietnam showcases the artefacts associated with betel chewing in the country. The practice of chewing areca nut with betel leaves is widespread in Southeast Asia.

Betel Chewing set at the Vietnam National History Museum, Vietnam Net 20121025

Betel Chewing set at the Vietnam National History Museum, Vietnam Net 20121025

Artifacts of the betel and areca culture
Vietnam Net, 25 October 2012
Read More

1-metre gold necklace among finds from Cebu

No Comments

An excavation in Cebu, Philippines, conducted by the University of San Carlos has unearthed the remains of a female buried with gold jewellery. Other rare discoveries include a powder box that may have been used for betel nuu chewinng. The find is dated to the start of the 16th century and may confirm Cebu’s position as a gold-trading partner with China before colonisation by the Spaniards.

Boljoon Church
photo credit: Cheonsa

Rare gold jewelry finds in Boljoon town
Cebu Daily News, 02 April 2008

More gold, more puzzles from Boljoon
Cebu Daily News, 02 April 2008
Read More

Antiquity findings in ancient village

No Comments

18 July 2006 (Vietnam Net Bridge) – 500-year-old village found in Vietnam featuring intact architecture, and small finds indicating betel-chewing.

Antiquity findings in ancient village

Many valuable findings have been made at a no longer used 500-year-old village in the central province of Quang Ngai, the oldest village in central Vietnam still has most of its original architecture intact.

Covering an area of more than 10,000 sq.m, the village is surrounded by an imposing stone wall that is 2.5-3 metre high and 1-1.5 metres wide. The wall was constructed to guard villagers against enemies or wild beasts. Similar stone walls were also found in other central region areas, such as Do Linh in Quang Tri province and Ly Son Island in Quang Ngai.


Related Books:
Early Civilizations of Southeast Asia by D. J. W. O’Reilly
Early Cultures of Mainland Southeast Asia