UP study offers clues to ancient biodiversity, early human movement in Southeast Asia

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via UP Press Office, 18 July 2017:

The prehistoric shell tools uncovered in Mindoro by the team of archaeologists, geologists, ecologists, geneticists and social scientists from the University of the Philippines could point to the start of a transition from hunting/gathering to the agricultural or semi-agricultural subsistence strategies of our ancestors.

Since 2012, the team has been working on an ambitious multiyear project funded by the Emerging Interdisciplinary Research Program to answer questions about ancient biodiversity and early human movement in Island Southeast Asia.

Using Mindoro as the site of study, they hoped to find not only further clues to how early humans arrived in the Philippine islands and how landscape formation, sea levels and landmass affected their movement but also indications of how such movement changed fauna and flora.

Source: UP study offers clues to ancient biodiversity, early human movement in Southeast Asia

Call for Papers: Hukay The Journal for Archaeological Research in Asia and the Pacific

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Hukay is the Journal for Archaeological Research in Asia and the Pacific. It accepts articles on the archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and heritage of the Asia and Pacific regions. Papers may be submitted throughout the year and are reviewed by three specialists from a pool of international scholars. Reviewers’ comments and suggestions are forwarded to the author(s), who should implement them in the final version of the paper.

Manuscripts may be submitted via email to Grace Barretto-Tesoro at mdbarretto@up.edu.ph or grabarr@cantab.net
for more information please visit the Hukay website http://www.upd.edu.ph/~asp/hukay

Call for Papers: Hukay

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Hukay: The Journal for Archaeological Research in Asia and the Pacific, published twice a year, is the refereed journal published by the University of the Philippines- Archaeological Studies Program. Hukay accepts articles on the archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and heritage of the Asia and Pacific regions. Reviews of books and articles on similar and related topics are likewise accepted. On occasions, we invite a guest editor to come up with a theme volume. Papers may be submitted throughout the year while contributions for theme volumes have specific deadlines. Articles are reviewed by at least three specialists from a pool of international scholars. Reviewers’ comments and suggestions are forwarded to the author(s), who should implement them in the final version of the paper.

Manuscripts may be mailed or personally submitted with a soft copy to: The Editor, Hukay, Archaeological Studies Program, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines, 1101 or sent to mdbarretto@up.edu.ph

For more information, visit the official HUKAY webpage at http://www.upd.edu.ph/~asp/hukay/

The Huluga controversy continues

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21 August 2007 (MindaNews) – Elson T. Elizaga of the Heritage Conservation Advocates writes his account of the events surrounding the destruction of the Huluga Open Site in Cagayan de Oro, Philippines, and HCA’s bone (pun intended) with the National Museum of the Philippines.

Trash
Elson T. Elizaga

One important lesson I got from a news reporting class in Silliman University came from Dr. Crispin Maslog. He said that if you want to study a man, you take the contents of his wastebasket.

This advice is popular in other sciences, such as forensics, zoology, and archaeology. Put “midden important in archaeology” in google.com and you’ll find numerous references. Even if you insert “not” in the phrase, the result will be the same. One website is socialstudiesforkids.com. It says, “It might sound a little silly, but archaeologists can find out a lot about people by looking through their trash.” In 2006, trash middens in Alaska have changed a popular belief about Inupiat Eskimos.

Trash is encyclopedia.

On August 5, 2003, an archaeologist couldn’t contain her excitement when she found shells, animal bones, and earthenware sherds at the bottom of Obsidian Hill in Huluga. “Oh, we’ve found a midden, a kitchen midden!” Dr. Erlinda Burton exclaimed. Her companions were the wife and daughter of Atty. Maning Ravanera and myself.

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Cagayan de Oro update 2: Responses from archaeological team and city

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16 August 2007 (From the Cagayan de Oro City Information Office and The Inquirer) – There’s another side to Cagayan de Oro story, it seems. In another story about the Huluga Open Site, the archaeology team from the University of the Philippines who investigated the site in 2004 was criticised for producing a “mock report” when Cagayan de Oro City commissioned an investigation into the site. Published here is the offending article from the Philippine Inquirer, and responses by the University of the Philippines Archeology Studies Program and the Cagayan De Oro Historical and Cultural Commission.

Cagayan de Oro’s lost treasure

Statement of the Members of the University of the Philippines-Archaeological Studies Program, Cagayan de Oro Project

Statement of the Members of the Historical and Cultural Commission Cagayan de Oro City

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