ArchaeoGlobe: Join the first Global Assessment of Archaeological Knowledge on Land Use

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The ArchaeoGlobe Project is a “massively collaborative effort” (see Gowers & Nielsen 2009) to assess archaeological knowledge on human land use across the globe over the past 10,000 years.

Join our broad network of archaeologists to share your expert knowledge on past land use across the globe, through a questionnaire on regional land use in 10 distinct timeslices (10,000 bp, 8,000 bp, 6,000 bp, 4,000 bp, 3,000 bp, 2,000 bp, 1,000 bp, 1500 CE, 1750 CE, 1850 CE). With your regional expertise, we can build the first global inventory of archaeological expert knowledge on Earth’s long-term transformation by human use of land.

View the global map of regions and subregions in Google Maps.
ArchaeoGlobe Survey Structure Diagram
Archaeologists completing the questionnaire for at least 4 subregions will be listed as co-authors on the resulting paper (unless they opt out), which we aim to publish in a high profile cross-disciplinary journal (e.g. Nature, Science, PNAS). Filling out the questionnaire for a single subregion takes 7-10 minutes, so we are asking co-authors to devote 1-2 hours of their time. Coauthors are invited to participate further in paper production, as desired.

Survey-based approach, ‘crowdsourcing’ expert knowledge
Co-authorship for substantial knowledge contributions
All results will be fully available in an open-source format
Assess levels of knowledge on four land use categories:
Foraging/hunting/gathering/fishing
Extensive agriculture
Intensive agriculture
Pastoralism

Source: ArchaeoGlobe

Archaeological Ethics Database

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An interesting web resource:

This database is an ongoing project by the Register of Professional Archaeologists (the Register) and the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (CIfA). The goal of the database is to bring together sources on archaeological ethics in a single place for the use of students, researchers, and professional archaeologists. The archaeological ethics database includes over five hundred sources relating to ethics in archaeology.

Archaeological Ethics Database

New Journal: Pratu – Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia

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Check out this new journal from Southeast Asian Art Academic Programme at SOAS. The journal is calling for papers for the inaugural 2019 issue, see here.

Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia

Pratu: Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia is the initiative of a group of research students in the Department of History of Art and Archaeology at SOAS University of London in collaboration with departmental mentors. The journal is funded by the Alphawood Foundation, under the auspices of the Southeast Asian Art Academic Programme (SAAAP). The student editorial group works closely with an advisory group formed of members of SAAAP’s Research & Publications Committee.

Pratu is conceived as a site for emerging scholars to publish new research on the ancient to premodern Buddhist and Hindu visual and material culture of Southeast Asia. The journal’s remit adheres to that of SAAAP itself, covering ‘study of the built environment, sculpture, painting, illustrated texts, textiles and other tangible or visual representations, along with the written word related to these, and archaeological, museum and cultural heritage’.

Pratu means ‘gateway’ or ‘entrance’ in several Southeast Asian languages. The salience of the term for our project lies in its etymological development, where the application of Khmer morphology to Tai terminology to name architectural structures of Indic fame betrays the complexity of the historical evolution of Southeast Asian Buddhist and Hindu traditions. The journal is a gateway: a space of access and transition that reflects our aim to facilitate new scholars’ first experiences with academic publishing as they move from student to early career researcher status. This includes Southeast Asian scholars who would like to reach a wider readership by publishing in English translation and benefitting from the peer-review process. In this way Pratu offers greater exposure to scholars and new research, and furthers the development of inter-institutional and international collaboration.

Source: Pratu

Palm leaves to tablet as Lao manuscripts go online

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via ANN, 15 Feb 2018: The Digital Library of Lao Manuscripts is online and more accessible than ever.

VIENTIANE (Vientiane Times/ANN) – The nation’s heritage of palm leaf manuscripts is now available for everyone to read free of charge via their computer, tablet or mobile phone, Director of the National Library of Laos (NLL), Khanthamaly Yangnouvong said recently.

Source: Palm leaves to tablet as Lao manuscripts go online

Petition to start a Society of American Archaeology Southeast Asian Archaeology Interest Group

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If you’re a member of the SAA, please sing this petition to help form an interest group for Southeast Asian Archaeology.

We the undersigned wish to form an Interest Group of the Society of American Archaeology devoted to the promotion of Southeast Asian Archaeology (SEAA). The unique and specific aim of the SEAA Interest Group is to provide an international forum for archaeologists and other scholars with a common interest in the archaeology of Southeast Asia. We consider the region of Southeast Asia to include countries in mainland Southeast Asia (Cambodia, Laos, Peninsular Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam), Island Southeast Asia (Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, East Timor). We recognize that the Pacific Islands (Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia) had long-standing interactions with Southeast Asia, and welcome scholars with research interests in this domain as well. The aim of our group is to advance the field of Southeast Asian Archaeology by providing an opportunity for scholars to share and promote research on this region, and encourage discussion and intra-regional collaboration, thereby facilitating the growth and development of scholars with an interest in Southeast Asia. 
 Please contact Alison Carter (alisonkyra@gmail.com) with your ideas, comments and suggestions. The full proposal document is here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1n2ZQQ65G-kMjtqiO4MqV77c3jV4l114hAqlSp54ZPUo/edit?usp=sharing Please encourage your colleagues to sign as well.

Source: Petition to start a Society of American Archaeology Southeast Asian Archaeology Interest Group

Follow Darren Curnoe on his Niah Caves excavation

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Darren Curnoe of the University of New South Wales is on his three-week excavation of the Niah Caves in Sarawak and he will be tweeting and broadcasting his experiences on Facebook Live. You can follow his progress here:

Darren Curnoe – Anthropologist. 80 likes. Biological anthropologist and archaeologist with an insatiable curiosity about the kind of creature we are and how we came to be this way.

Source: Darren Curnoe – Anthropologist

Follow me on Instagram – @southeastasianarchaeology

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If you’ve been following the Twitter and Facebook feed of this website, you might have noticed that I’ve just started an Instagram feed for the website. You can follow me at @southeastasianarchaeology. If you’re not on Instagram, you can also see the feed via the widget on the side of the main website.

I’ll be posting photos from my archives and my ongoing work, and I’ll be happy to like or repost photos with the hashtag #southeastasianarchaeology

Source: Southeast Asian Archaeology (@southeastasianarchaeology) • Instagram photos and videos

Thai culture goes digital

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via Bangkok Post, 08 Nov 2017: Check out the Thai cultural heritage online at digitalcenter.finearts.go.th

To ensure better access and understanding of national cultural heritage, the Fine Arts Department has applied and developed information technology systems in six aspects.

The Silpakorn Online System is an app for the department’s official website. It gathers information on Thai historic sites, national museums, learning sources, national libraries, national archives, procurement and new books of the department.

The Smart Museum System is an app for the National Museum Bangkok and is iOS and Android compatible. The system reads QR codes and Augmented Reality Code (AR code) for photographs and videos of the museum, its exhibitions and displayed objects. The AR code uses 3D technology to present 3D models of Phutthai Sawan, Sivamokphiman and Issaretratchanusorn halls, royal mansions and all ancient artefacts at 360 degrees. The Phra Nakhon Khiri National Museum in Phetchaburi province is the first national museum in Thailand to fully apply a guide application and an AR code guidance system under the 2.4 million baht pilot project.

The Virtual Museum System gathers and presents information on all national museums, their displayed ancient artefacts and art objects via a website. It offers virtual tours of all museums and 3D images of major artefacts at 360 degrees and enables viewer interaction.

The Fine Arts Department’s digital archive includes more than 2,400 e-books and 500 videos from the department’s original versions, as well as old photos of major incidents, such as the 25th anniversary of King Rama V’s coronation and the royal visits and work of King Rama VII from 1927 to 1930.

Source: Thai culture goes digital | Bangkok Post: lifestyle

Categories: Thailand Websites

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