Mystery of an old village unveiled

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4 August 2006 (Viet Nam News) – A follow up report of the unearthed ancient village in the central Quang Ngai province in Vietnam, with details of Viet and Cham finds in a shrine to the White Tiger.

Viet Nam News, 4 Aug 2006

Mystery of an old village unveiled

Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of a village believed to be 600 years old in the Nghia Hanh District in the central province of Quang Ngai…

Two lime pots and ceramic pieces made by Viet and Cham people were found in a shrine dedicated to the white tiger at the back of the village.


Related Books:
Folk Pottery in South-East Asia by D. F. Rooney
The Ceramics of Southeast Asia : Their Dating and Identification by R. M. Brown
Vietnamese Ceramics: A Separate Tradition by J. Stevensen, J. Guy and L. A. Cort

Archaeological objects dug up in 2 provinces

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1 Aug 2006 (Vietnam Net Bridge) – A composite of two stories, the first reports finds of Tran Dynsaty artifacts from Yen Bai Province, the second already mentioned on a previous post of the fishing village in the Khanh Hoa Province. Sorry for the delay! I’ve been ill.

Archaeological objects dug up in 2 provinces

A number of Tran Dynasty (1225-1400) relics have been uncovered during an excavation of the archaeological site at the [tag]Ben Lan Pagoda[/tag] in the northwestern province of Yen Bai.

Archaeologists from the Viet Nam Institute of Archaeology (VNIA) and the Yen Bai Museum discovered vestiges of 12 terracotta towers, increasing the number of towers at the site to 14. The first two towers were found during another excavation last year.

3,500-year-old fishing village discovered in Khanh Hoa province

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30 July 2006 (Vietnam Net Bridge) – What is believed to be the oldest fishing village in central Vietnam has been unearthed in the Khanh Hoa Province.

3,500-year-old fishing village discovered in Khanh Hoa province

The head of the excavation team, Dr. Tran Qui Thinh, said scientists have found traces of cooking stoves and unearthed 261 items, including ceramic objects and objects made from stone and animal bone, as well as tens of thousands of ceramics pieces and animal bones, approximately 120cm under the surface.


Related Books:
The Archaeology of Mainland Southeast Asia: From 10,000 B.C. to the Fall of Angkor by C. Higham

Cham tower ruins pulled from bowels of construction

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26 July 2006 (Nhan Dan) – Remains of a Cham tower uncovered in Quang Ngai Province.

Cham tower ruins pulled from bowels of construction

A Cham tower structure was found last week while local workers were leveling a road surface for the base of the new industrial complex in the central province of Quang Ngai.

The ancient structure is estimated to have several towers adjoining each other. The gates of the tower face southeast, toward the Ve River. Neither the age nor the exact year they collapsed have been established.


Related Books:
Hindu-Buddhist Art Of Vietnam: Treasures From Champa by E. Guillon
The Art of Champa by J. Hubert

Antiquity findings in ancient village

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18 July 2006 (Vietnam Net Bridge) – 500-year-old village found in Vietnam featuring intact architecture, and small finds indicating betel-chewing.

Antiquity findings in ancient village

Many valuable findings have been made at a no longer used 500-year-old village in the central province of Quang Ngai, the oldest village in central Vietnam still has most of its original architecture intact.

Covering an area of more than 10,000 sq.m, the village is surrounded by an imposing stone wall that is 2.5-3 metre high and 1-1.5 metres wide. The wall was constructed to guard villagers against enemies or wild beasts. Similar stone walls were also found in other central region areas, such as Do Linh in Quang Tri province and Ly Son Island in Quang Ngai.


Related Books:
Early Civilizations of Southeast Asia by D. J. W. O’Reilly
Early Cultures of Mainland Southeast Asia

20,000 year old artifacts discovered in Quang Tri

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15 July 2006 (VietNam Net Bridge) -Reports of an ongoing excavation belonging to a prehistoric culture.

20,000 year old artifacts discovered in Quang Tri

Archeologists from the Quang Tri Museum and the Viet Nam Institute of Archeology have unearthed hundreds of artifacts believed to belong to the early Hoa Binh culture dating back to about 15,000-20,000 years ago at an excavation site in central Quang Tri Province.


Related Books:
Southeast Asia: From Prehistory to History by I. Glover

Ancient ship wreck yields antiques in Vietnam waters

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Yes! It has been a rather slow news week, which explains the lack of updates.
14 July 2006 (Thanh Nien News) – A shipwreck found off the coast of the Binh Dinh Province has yielded Song Dynasty ceramics in an initial survey.

Ancient ship wreck yields antiques in Vietnam waters

Vietnam province authorities recently discovered a shipwreck off the central coast loaded with antique pottery, reported central Binh Dinh province museum.

According to the museum authorities, the wreck is located at sea waters of My Duc commune of Phu My district in Binh Dinh province.


Related Books:
Shipwrecks and Sunken Treasure in Southeast Asia by T. Wells
Oriental trade ceramics in Southeast Asia, 10th to 16th century: Selected from Australian collections, including the Art Gallery of South Australia and the Bodor Collection by J. Guy
Chinese Celadons and Other Related Wares in Southeast Asia by the Southeast Asian Ceramic Society

Ancient village discovered in central Vietnam

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5 July 2006 (Thanh Nien News)

Ancient village discovered in central Vietnam

Archaeologists last month unearthed an almost 600-year-old village in the central Vietnam province of Quang Ngai.

Andrew Hardy, chief representative of Far East Archaeological Museum in Vietnam, in coordination with domestic researchers discovered the village which is almost intact.

Centuries-old coffins rotting at ancient burial site

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3 July 2006 (Viet Nam News) – Some 200 coffins, possibly dating to the early 8th century, risk becoming irrepairably damaged unless preservation actions are taken.

Centuries-old coffins rotting at ancient burial site

A cave containing 200 centuries-old wooden coffins in the northern province of Thanh Hoa may be irreparably damaged unless it is preserved soon by archaeologists, says a local official.

The cave is hidden in a dense forest near the top of a high rocky mountain at a spot where the Luong estuary merges into the Ma River in Hoi Xuan Commune, about 140 km away from Thanh Hoa City.

The wrath of the gods and other hassles

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23 June 2006 (Thanh Nien Daily News) – A convoluted tale of mistaken identification of provenance, treasure-hunting and “duds” in Vietnam.

The wrath of the gods and other hassles

The Vietnamese police have returned artifacts they earlier claimed to be a “national treasure” made of pure gold to a woman who dug them up in 1997, giving rise to tales of gold, gods, and the law.

… In 2001, after running up debts, the woman decided to sell the ‘treasure’… attracted the attention of the police, who, believing the objects to be national treasures, seized everything pending investigation.

Besides confiscating the money from the purchase, the police asked the local people’s committee to fine Bay for trading in national treasures, which is punishable under Vietnamese law.

… The National Council for Antiquity Analysis tested the objects and concluded they were cast recently and were definitely not national treasures.

… The site of the treasure, Bay’s garden, used to be a part of the Cham kingdom, which was rich in gold. The Cham also made lots of small idols, many of them in pure gold.

Thus, someone living there much later could have dug up genuinely gold idols and, believing they had robbed the earth of a precious treasure and fearing its wrath, made fake idols to replace them.

After bringing home the real treasures, they could have buried the fake ones at the exact location to cheat the earth goddess into believing they were still there.