Vietnamese archaeological treasures introduced to public

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via Nhan Dan News, 12 April 2018:


Over 300 Vietnamese archaeological artifacts, found throughout the nation during the past 60 years, are on display at a special exhibition titled “Treasures of Vietnam’s archaeology,” which opened at the Vietnam National Museum of History in Hanoi, on April 12.

Source: Vietnamese archaeological treasures introduced to public

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IPPA 2018 updates

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Some news from the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association Secretariat: The 2018 congress has a new website online:

Registration and other details are now available at the website: https://sites.google.com/site/ippasecretariat/

I think all the panels are finalised, but there are some panels looking for (more) papers such as:

Please check with the relevant panel conveners if you are still interested in presenting a paper in Hue.

Categories: Conferences Vietnam

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German police hand over antiquities to Vietnam

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via Vietnam Plus, 30 March 2018:

The Vietnamese Embassy in Germany on March 29 received antiques which Berlin police seized from an unidentified Vietnamese entrepreneur in late 2016.

Berlin police said the objects consist of 10 stone tools and eight bronze tools. Archaeologists from many in Berlin examined these objects and found they date back to between the second and the seventh centuries BC and could belong to tombs in the third century BC

Source: German police hand over antiquities to Vietnam (Vietnam Plus)

Categories: Lithics Vietnam

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IPPA 2018 – Website and Session proposal calls

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Forwarding information from the IPPA Scretary-General, Ian Lilley:

Dear IPPA Community,

This is a second and final call for sessions and papers. The Congress will open on Sunday 23 September and sessions will run on Monday 24, Tuesday 25, Thursday 27 and Friday 28 September. Following IPPA tradition, we will keep Wednesday 25 September free for rest and local tours in and around the World Heritage city of Hue, where there is plenty to do and see. There is a good range of accommodation, from very inexpensive to higher-cost. Vietnam has an excellent tourist industry, so all tours (including pre- and post-Congress tours) will be the responsibility of individual IPPA delegates, not the conference organisers.

Program space is still available. There will be four 90-minute session blocks each day, with parallel sessions running in each time-block as required. A standard single session will be 90 minutes, ending in a coffee or lunch break. Sessions may take up more than one 90 block as required, but only in whole blocks. The session format is up to session organisers (ie standard group of presentations, discussion panel, forum etc). Individual papers that are not part of an organised session will be aggregated in unthemed general sessions.

 

Individual delegates may have their name on any number of sessions or papers but to keep the organisation of the program manageable each delegate will be limited to two (2) presenting/speaking roles only (such as presenter/speaker, discussant, panel member, forum member, facilitator, moderator, chair).

Please have your suggestions to me by no later than 31 March 2018. Acceptance of late submissions cannot be guaranteed.

Formal letters of invitation will be provided by the Vietnamese conference hosts as required after sessions and papers have been accepted. Funding assistance will be very limited, with priority given to currently-enrolled students.

Please also note that the Vietnamese annual national archaeological conference “New discoveries in Archaeology 2017” will be held in Hue on Saturday 29 September, immediately following the IPPA meeting.

Source: IPPA HUE 2018

Categories: Conferences Vietnam

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Hanoi attempts to leverage museums, theatres for tourism development

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via Viet Nam Net, 24 Jan 2018:

The move was carried out under the instruction of Minister of Culture, Sports and Tourism Nguyen Ngoc Thien on the implementation of plans to organise high-quality art programmes and develop cultural products to serve tourists.

The Vietnam National Administration of Tourism worked with the Vietnam National Museum of History, the Vietnam Fine Arts Museum, the Vietnam National Puppetry Theatre, the Centre for Research, Preservation and Promotion of Vietnamese Traditional Culture, and travel firms to build these tours.

Visitors had a chance to explore the Vietnam National Museum of History, visit Hanoi’s Old Quarter, an old house on Ma May, Bach Ma Temple and try some street food on January 18.

Hanoi attempts to leverage museums, theatres for tourism development

Da Nang Museum of Cham Sculpture: Catalogue Launch at SOAS

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Book launch in London this Friday (12 Jan 2018). Register via the link below:

Join us for the UK launch of Vibrancy In Stone, the newly-published catalogue of the Da Nang Museum of Cham Sculpture. The catalogue, supported by the Southeast Asian Art Academic Programme (SAAAP) at SOAS University of London, marks the centenary of the Cham Museum and is the first catalogue by the Museum itself of its world-leading collection. The catalogue brings together the work of international scholars, local scholars and SOAS alumni, and is edited by Vietnamese Museum Director Vo Van Thang, leading Vietnamese art historian Tran Ky Phuong and Peter Sharrock of SOAS.  At the event, the Editors will deliver lectures on their contribution to the publication and consider the background to the text. Copies of the catalogue will be on hand to purchase, and a drinks reception will follow.

Source: Da Nang Museum of Cham Sculpture: Catalogue Launch at SOAS

[New Paper] Potent Places in Central Vietnam: ‘Everything that Comes Out of the Earth is Cham’

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New paper in the Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology by Anne-Valérie Schweyer:

Set apart from the so-called ‘Hinduisation’ process, the Cham country is characterised by the presence of many sites or shrines dedicated to local deities. This paper—based on the analysis of archaeological and anthropological evidence—aims to identify these cults, to clarify the associated practices and to demonstrate how the local cults map out the entire local geography. Moreover, in central Vietnam, it is possible to precisely examine ‘potent places’ in order to achieve a better understanding of the local cults and the persistence of those cults from antiquity to the present. In ancient times, each local deity was connected to a political power, which ‘exhaled’ it and, at the same time, put a mark on the territory. The diversity of potent places allows a better understanding of puzzling territories. The continuity of ritual practices performed at Cham potent places, centuries after the disappearance of any form of Cham political power, shows the link between the first occupants of the land and the following Viet inhabitants.

Source: Potent Places in Central Vietnam: ‘Everything that Comes Out of the Earth is Cham’
https://doi.org/10.1080/14442213.2017.1370478

Categories: Champa Papers Vietnam

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