Vestige of Cham towers unveiled in Da Nang

No Comments
Cham tower discovered in Da Nang, Viet Nam Net 20180823

via Vietnam Net, 23 August 2018:

Three excavations saw archaeologists find statues of animals, ceramics and roof tiles.

The finding at Phong Le Village is believed to be the site of a Cham place of worship from the 10th to 11th century.

Cham is an indigenous group of Vietnam and Cambodia, who formed an independent kingdom from the 2nd to 17th centuries AD.

Source: Vestige of Cham towers unveiled in Da Nang – News VietNamNet

Vietnam, Cambodia should cooperate in tourism: official

No Comments
Ha Long Bay. Source: Khmer Times 20180824

via Khmer Times, 24 August 2018:

Ha Long Bay. Source: Khmer Times 20180824

Ha Long Bay. Source: Khmer Times 20180824

Cambodia and Vietnam should work together to promote their popular tourist draws, particularly Ha Long Bay in Northern Vietnam, and the Angkor archaeological complex in Siem Reap, according to a Vietnamese official.

Nguyen Khao Thai, an official at the Vietnamese Ministry of Information and Communication, proposed the idea.

“Ha Long Bay, is one of the most beautiful bays and a Unesco-listed site that attracts around 7 million local and foreign tourists every year.

“Cambodia’s Angkor Wat is also a Unesco site that attracts millions of tourists, so both countries should jointly promote tourism packages to these destinations to increase the number of visitors.”

Source: Vietnam, Cambodia should cooperate in tourism: official – Khmer Times

Appeal from the Vietnam Maritime Archaeology Project

No Comments

via Facebook:

The Vietnam Maritime Archaeology Project needs your help! In 2016 and 2017 the VMAP team identified a neolithic site (estimated 3000BP) at a modern burial ground at Minh Chau on Quan Lan Island. In 2018 the team carried out limited excavations to gain an understanding of the deposit and it boundaries. VMAP needs financial or institutional support for large scale excavations at this emerging site. For three years the project has been funded through the generosity of individual participants with some assistance from Minelab Electronics and Send-To, however if we cannot raise the funds necessary to carry out excavations at Minh Chau in 2019 the project will be ‘parked’. The VMAP team will continue with research into the ancient port of Van Don in 2019. If anyone has any ideas about how to fund the continuing excavations at Minh Chau please contact the project coordinator Bob Sheppard at bob@heritagedetection.com.au

Categories: Vietnam

Tags:

[Paper] Ancient genomes document multiple waves of migration in Southeast Asian prehistory

2 Comments

A paper published in Science analyses the genomes of ancient Southeast Asian DNA and detected three distinct waves of migration into Southeast Asia beginning with hunter-gatherers around 45,000 years ago, followed by the Neolithic and the introduction of agricultural practices some 4,500 years ago, and a migration associated with the Bronze age, which reached Myanmar 3,000 years ago, Vietnam 2,000 years ago and Thailand in the last 1,000 years.

Ancient genomes document multiple waves of migration in Southeast Asian prehistory
Science 17 May 2018:
DOI: 10.1126/science.aat3188

Southeast Asia is home to rich human genetic and linguistic diversity, but the details of past population movements in the region are not well known. Here, we report genome-wide ancient DNA data from eighteen Southeast Asian individuals spanning from the Neolithic period through the Iron Age (4100–1700 years ago). Early farmers from Man Bac in Vietnam exhibit a mixture of East Asian (southern Chinese agriculturalist) and deeply diverged eastern Eurasian (hunter-gatherer) ancestry characteristic of Austroasiatic speakers, with similar ancestry as far south as Indonesia providing evidence for an expansive initial spread of Austroasiatic languages. By the Bronze Age, in a parallel pattern to Europe, sites in Vietnam and Myanmar show close connections to present-day majority groups, reflecting substantial additional influxes of migrants.

Source: Ancient genomes document multiple waves of migration in Southeast Asian prehistory | Science

See also: