Why the Sangh Parivar’s Idea of Building a ‘Hindu Dham’ in Cambodia Is Wrong

via The Wire, 16 June 2018:

Project Hindu dham in Cambodia is not just misinformed: it is a regressive step in the history of India-Southeast Asia relations that could start a dangerous chain of religious disharmony and unrest.

The chief rationale for this project appears to be the grand Vaishnava temple of Angkor Wat in Cambodia. Five hundred acres of land has been acquired and 1,008 Shivalingas established to mark the creation of a fifth dham for Hindus. The project is evidently well-funded. Its chief proponents perceive this enterprise as a ‘cultural investment’, an apt way to promote Hinduism beyond India, to revitalise historical links between South and Southeast Asian nations, and to encourage trans-Asian pilgrim networks.

Source: Why the Sangh Parivar’s Idea of Building a ‘Hindu Dham’ in Cambodia Is Wrong

[Paper] Complex history of dog (Canis familiaris) origins and translocations in the Pacific revealed by ancient mitogenomes

New paper in Nature about the origins and spread of dogs in Southeast Asia and the Pacific by Kreig et al.

Article

Complex history of dog (Canis familiaris) origins and translocations in the Pacific revealed by ancient mitogenomes

Archaeological evidence suggests that dogs were introduced to the islands of Oceania via Island Southeast Asia around 3,300 years ago, and reached the eastern islands of Polynesia by the fourteenth century AD. This dispersal is intimately tied to human expansion, but the involvement of dogs in Pacific migrations is not well understood. Our analyses of seven new complete ancient mitogenomes and five partial mtDNA sequences from archaeological dog specimens from Mainland and Island Southeast Asia and the Pacific suggests at least three dog dispersal events into the region, in addition to the introduction of dingoes to Australia. We see an early introduction of dogs to Island Southeast Asia, which does not appear to extend into the islands of Oceania. A shared haplogroup identified between Iron Age Taiwanese dogs, terminal-Lapita and post-Lapita dogs suggests that at least one dog lineage was introduced to Near Oceania by or as the result of interactions with Austronesian language speakers associated with the Lapita Cultural Complex. We did not find any evidence that these dogs were successfully transported beyond New Guinea. Finally, we identify a widespread dog clade found across the Pacific, including the islands of Polynesia, which likely suggests a post-Lapita dog introduction from southern Island Southeast Asia.

Source: Nature

Postdoctoral fellowship: Centre for the Study of Modern and Contemporary History

Closing date is 30 June 2018

The Centre hosts a three-month postdoctoral fellowship in collaboration with the Institute of Advanced Studies in the Humanities

The Centre hosts a three-month postdoctoral fellowship in collaboration with the Institute of Advanced Studies in the Humanities

The three-month CMSCH-IASH Visiting Postdoctoral Fellowship in Modern and Contemporary History is intended to encourage outstanding early-career interdisciplinary research and scholarly collaboration in the broad field of modern and contemporary history. The fellow will be affiliated with the Centre for the Study of Modern and Contemporary History in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology and the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities.

Each year, the CMSCH will select an interdisciplinary research theme and applicants will need to show that their research addresses this theme. Otherwise, there is no limit on geographical area or time period, as long as the bulk of the applicant’s research falls within the ‘modern and contemporary’ period (c.1800-present).

Source: Postdoctoral fellowship

An Incredibly Detailed Map Of Medieval Trade Routes

via Merchant Machine, 19 May 2018: Trade routes of the world in the 11th and 12th centuries, including Southeast Asia!

Map created by reddit user martinjanmansson. Click to zoom in. The map above is probably the most detailed map of Medieval Trade Routes in Europe, Asia and Africa in the 11th and 12th centuries you can find online. It includes major and minor locations, major and minor routes, sea routes, canals

Source: An Incredibly Detailed Map Of Medieval Trade Routes

[Job]: Collections Assistant (Asian Anthropology)

Application deadline is 10 June 2018. Details and link below.

Collections Assistant (Asian Anthropology) (Fixed Term) in the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge.
The Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (MAA) is one of the nine University of Cambridge Museums and Botanic Garden (UCM). It is a sub-Department of the University Department of Social Anthropology and is a key resource for University teaching and research, particularly in collaboration with the Departments of Social Anthropology and Archaeology. Its world-class collections attract visiting researchers from all over the world and it maintains an active programme of temporary exhibitions and loans to major exhibitions within the UK and internationally. MAA’s collections are Designated for their national and international importance. For further information about the Museum’s staff, collections, and programmes, see www.maa.cam.ac.uk.

The Museum has embarked on a partnership with the Cambridge Rivers Project, aimed at researching and making accessible the extensive collections of artefacts from Asia for which it cares. Approximately 80,000 artefacts, 50,000 photographs and a rich documentary archive chart Cambridge’s role in archaeological and anthropological research across the continent, from the 1880s and through the twentieth century. The stories they contain are of importance to communities, scholars and publics worldwide as well as in Britain, illuminating the diversity of human experience and creativity, as well as complex shared histories of cross-cultural encounter that MAA is committed to telling. For more information on the Cambridge Rivers Project and its activities, see www.cambridgerivers.com

To support this project, MAA is seeking to appoint a full-time Collections Assistant (Asian Anthropology) for one year to work with Senior Curator for Anthropology Dr Mark Elliott, Collections Manager for Anthropology Rachel Hand, and researchers from the Cambridge Rivers Project to document, photograph and research collections from East, Southeast and South Asia, predominantly in the anthropology collections. The role will involve facilitating research access and supporting the work of the Cambridge Rivers Project, maintaining appropriate standards of documentation and collections care, and carrying out research to improve knowledge of the collections.

The successful candidate will have an understanding of and interest in museum collections with a background in Asian anthropology, archaeology or a related discipline, and demonstrated experience of object research. Knowledge of a relevant language is desirable. S/he will have very good IT skills including spreadsheets and basic word processing and experience with collections management systems. Excellent attention to detail and very good written and verbal communication skills are essential as well as excellent organisational skills and the ability to work independently and as part of a team.

Source: http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/17533/

Call for Papers: Naditira Widya Journal

NADITIRA WIDYA adalah salah satu media publikasi Balai Arkeologi Kalimantan Selatan hasil penelitian dan pengembangan arkeologi berupa buah pikiran penulis dan warisan budaya

Submission guidelines here: https://naditirawidya.kemdikbud.go.id/index.php/nw/announcement/view/2

CFP: Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia

Rising Voices in Southeast Asian Studies – A SEAC / AAS Initiative with Support from the journal, TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia

Submission Deadline: June 15, 2018

The Southeast Asia Council (SEAC) of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) is seeking paper proposals from up-and-coming scholars to join a “Rising Voices” panel on the broad topic of “Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia.” We seek to recruit early career scholars from Southeast Asian countries in order to form a panel for eventual inclusion in the 2019 Annual Conference of the Association for Asian Studies, to be held in Denver, CO from March 21-24, 2019.

The panel will be chaired by Dr. Nam C. Kim, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Once paper presenters have been selected, the chair, along with Dr. Oona Paredes, Assistant Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore, will assist the panelists in preparing a panel abstract, facilitate revision of individual paper proposals, and offer mentoring and networking support to the panel participants, as needed.

With financial support from the AAS and the journal TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia, SEAC will be able to offer modest travel support to certain members of the panel with demonstrated need in traveling to the conference from Southeast Asia. It is hoped that participation in the panel will also enable scholars to obtain funding from other sources, including the individual country groups at AAS, as well as their home institutions, to stay for the whole conference. Once the panel is formed, the organizers will also make every effort to help panelists seek additional funding on the basis of demonstrated need. Upon completion of the conference, authors will be encouraged to submit their papers to TRaNS for potential publication, subject to peer-review.

Panel Topic Details

For the 2019 Rising Voices Panel, we seek to build a panel related to the broad topic of “Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia.” The exact panel description will be developed and refined once panelists have been selected, but the topic is designed to be inclusive enough to solicit a wide range of applicants for variant themes.

Papers should build on the recognition that notions about the recent or distant past can play an important role in the formulation of ideas around national identity, ethnicity, cultural heritage, and perceptions of inclusion and exclusion. This is especially so in post-colonial contexts. Contributors are free to present research related to these broad themes from any disciplinary angle, using materials that are archaeological, historical, or contemporary. Related sub-topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Appropriations of the past for nationalistic or political agendas
  • Contested constructions of history or national meta-narratives
  • Identity formation and notions of ethnicity
  • Challenges and opportunities in the interpretation of archaeological data
  • Conflicts over cultural heritage materials and properties, as related to ownership, access, and management
  • Culturally significant or sacred landscapes or artifacts
  • Commodification of the past, tourism, and economic development

While an emphasis on Southeast Asia is a requisite, comparisons with other Asian regions are welcomed and encouraged.

Eligibility and Selection Criteria

We seek papers by Southeast Asian scholars who are early career scholars, or “rising voices.” Rising voices are defined here as advanced graduate students (currently writing dissertations based on original field or archival research) or untenured faculty members (including tenure-track assistant professors, adjuncts, and lecturers, or the approximate equivalent based on the academic tradition from which the scholar is coming). Applicants may be currently enrolled as students in, or employed by, any institution of higher education in the world. However, preference may be placed on students or faculty currently based at underfunded institutions in Late Developing Countries (LDC) in Southeast Asia. (Please note that the definition of LDC used by the AAS excludes the following Asian countries: Australia, Hong Kong, Japan, New Zealand, Republic of China (Taiwan), Republic of Korea (South Korea), and Singapore). In addition to the stated goal of supporting rising voices from Southeast Asia, the primary criteria for selection will be the quality of the paper proposals as well as the way selected proposals work together as a viable panel.

Submission Instructions

To submit a paper proposal, please submit the following, in the order listed below, all in a single Microsoft word file or pdf document, by June 15, 2018:

  • Applicant’s Name, affiliation, and contact information, clearly indicating applicant’s country of birth and current country of residence.
  • Paper abstract. 250 words in the format of the standard AAS paper proposal.
  • Brief bio-sketch of 200-300 words describing current and recent scholarly positions, a brief sentence or two about current research, and any significant publications. The model for this should be the standard blurb one sees on a faculty or graduate student website.
  • Current curriculum vitae.
  • Please save the file with the following filename convention: RisingVoices2019_ApplicantsFamilyName.doc

Completed applications should be sent via email to Dr. Nam C. Kim (nckim2@wisc.edu) and Dr. Oona Paredes (seaomtp@nus.edu.sg) by June 15, 2018, with the subject heading of “2019 SEAC Rising Voices Proposal.”

Notes on Funding

This proposed panel is part of the “Rising Voices Initiative” which was initiated in 2013 by the Southeast Asia Council of the Association of Asian Studies in order to help supplement the limited amount of existing funding to support participation of young Southeast Asian scholars in the annual AAS Conference. Funding has been generously allocated for this project by the AAS Board of Directors and has been supplemented for the 2019 AAS Conference by TRaNS journal.

Application Timeline

  • May 2018: Call for papers published
  • June 15, 2018: Applications due by email to nckim2@wisc.edu and seaomtp@nus.edu.sg
  • July 1, 2018: Notice of selected papers sent out to applicants
  • July 1 – August 1, 2018: Panel description revised, individual paper proposals revised in communication with panel chair, Dr. Nam C. Kim, and Dr. Oona Paredes
  • August 1, 2018: Panel Submission Deadline to AAS

TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia is a journal in the field of Southeast Asian studies published by the Cambridge University Press.  TRaNSencourages globally engaged writings on Southeast Asia that cross national borders and disciplinary boundaries.

8th ASEMUS General Conference in Kuching, Malaysia

Entitled “New Curatorial Perspectives for a Changed World”, the 8th ASEMUS General Conference will be held in Sarawak, Malaysia, 14-16 November 2018.

Source: 8th ASEMUS General Conference in Kuching, Malaysia – Registration open! – Asia-Europe Museum Network

Vale Ian Glover

I am sorry to share the news of the passing of Ian Glover, a titan in the field of Southeast Asian archaeology. Lia Genovese shares the following:

Dear All,

In case you have not heard. Some very sad news.

Ian Glover passed away yesterday, on his birthday, while on holiday in Sicily. He collapsed after breakfast in Catania and could not be revived.

Only this afternoon I emailed him to wish him happy birthday again and to tell him about my recent fieldwork in Borneo. I also told him that conferences will never be the same again without him. I was referring to a recent conversation I had with Ian, when he told me that he would not be attending the IPPA in September this year because “he had nothing new to say”.

RIP, Ian, a gentleman and a most generous scholar.

New Journal: Pratu – Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia

Check out this new journal from Southeast Asian Art Academic Programme at SOAS. The journal is calling for papers for the inaugural 2019 issue, see here.

Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia

Pratu: Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia is the initiative of a group of research students in the Department of History of Art and Archaeology at SOAS University of London in collaboration with departmental mentors. The journal is funded by the Alphawood Foundation, under the auspices of the Southeast Asian Art Academic Programme (SAAAP). The student editorial group works closely with an advisory group formed of members of SAAAP’s Research & Publications Committee.

Pratu is conceived as a site for emerging scholars to publish new research on the ancient to premodern Buddhist and Hindu visual and material culture of Southeast Asia. The journal’s remit adheres to that of SAAAP itself, covering ‘study of the built environment, sculpture, painting, illustrated texts, textiles and other tangible or visual representations, along with the written word related to these, and archaeological, museum and cultural heritage’.

Pratu means ‘gateway’ or ‘entrance’ in several Southeast Asian languages. The salience of the term for our project lies in its etymological development, where the application of Khmer morphology to Tai terminology to name architectural structures of Indic fame betrays the complexity of the historical evolution of Southeast Asian Buddhist and Hindu traditions. The journal is a gateway: a space of access and transition that reflects our aim to facilitate new scholars’ first experiences with academic publishing as they move from student to early career researcher status. This includes Southeast Asian scholars who would like to reach a wider readership by publishing in English translation and benefitting from the peer-review process. In this way Pratu offers greater exposure to scholars and new research, and furthers the development of inter-institutional and international collaboration.

Source: Pratu