[Job] Visiting Fellow (Archaeologist) at the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre

Archaeology Fellowship at the Nalanda Sriwijaya Centre for Southeast Asian Archaeology! Applications close 31 March 2018 – link below.

The ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute’s (ISEAS) Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre (NSC) invites Archaeologists to apply for the post of: Visiting Fellow

Primary Responsibilities
Prepare and conduct the annual NSC Field School for undergraduate-level students in a Southeast Asian country.
In-charge of editing and soliciting papers for the Archaeological Report Series.
Conduct and publish original archaeological research on Southeast Asia while at NSC.
Assist NSC in the organisation and management of conferences, workshops and seminars.
Contribute to ISEAS collective research and public outreach efforts.

Requirements
A PhD. in Archaeology.
Expertise in Southeast Asian archaeology and/or premodern history.
Experience in conducting archaeological excavations or field work in Southeast Asia.
Good organisational and student-management skills.
High level of editorial and writing skills in English.
Ability to speak a Southeast Asian language preferred.
Positive work attitude, great communication skills, and ability to work under tight schedule.

Source: Career Opportunities – ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute

Petition to start a Society of American Archaeology Southeast Asian Archaeology Interest Group

If you’re a member of the SAA, please sing this petition to help form an interest group for Southeast Asian Archaeology.

We the undersigned wish to form an Interest Group of the Society of American Archaeology devoted to the promotion of Southeast Asian Archaeology (SEAA). The unique and specific aim of the SEAA Interest Group is to provide an international forum for archaeologists and other scholars with a common interest in the archaeology of Southeast Asia. We consider the region of Southeast Asia to include countries in mainland Southeast Asia (Cambodia, Laos, Peninsular Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam), Island Southeast Asia (Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, East Timor). We recognize that the Pacific Islands (Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia) had long-standing interactions with Southeast Asia, and welcome scholars with research interests in this domain as well. The aim of our group is to advance the field of Southeast Asian Archaeology by providing an opportunity for scholars to share and promote research on this region, and encourage discussion and intra-regional collaboration, thereby facilitating the growth and development of scholars with an interest in Southeast Asia. 
 Please contact Alison Carter (alisonkyra@gmail.com) with your ideas, comments and suggestions. The full proposal document is here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1n2ZQQ65G-kMjtqiO4MqV77c3jV4l114hAqlSp54ZPUo/edit?usp=sharing Please encourage your colleagues to sign as well.

Source: Petition to start a Society of American Archaeology Southeast Asian Archaeology Interest Group

World’s scientists turn to Asia and Australia to rewrite human history

via The Conversation, 08 December 2017

Researchers in human evolution used to focus on Africa and Eurasia – but not anymore. Discoveries in Asia and Australia have changed the picture, revealing early, complex cultures outside of Africa.

Source: World’s scientists turn to Asia and Australia to rewrite human history

RFP: Uncovering Human Origins in Asia and Africa

Grant opportunity by the National Geographic Society for human origins research, including within Southeast Asia. Deadline is on 3 January 2018

For more than 50 years, the National Geographic Society has supported exploration into the evolution of humankind. Our grants have led to hundreds of new discoveries in paleoanthropology, paleolithic archaeology, molecular anthropology, and paleoecology that have fundamentally changed the understanding of our own species. As we consider that legacy, we look to those areas of the planet where little is known about human origins, and we seek to invest in new ideas, projects, and explorers in and from these regions. The goal of this fund is to encourage more investigation of hominid evolution in Africa and Asia, with preference given to projects in relatively unexplored parts of those continents. Preference will also be given to applicants who are residents or citizens of the country of fieldwork as well as to projects with strong local capacity development components.

Priority will be given to projects that aim to do one or more of the following:

  • Discover or explore new paleoanthropological fossil sites in Africa or Asia, particularly those in Central and West Africa and those in East, Southeast, South, and Central Asia
  • Increase understanding of the biological, cultural, or ecological parameters of human origins in Africa or Asia
  • Develop local capacity in human origins exploration in Africa or Asia

Applicants may request up to US $50,000, though grants are typically funded for less than US $30,000. Up to 20 percent of the requested amount can be used as stipends for the applicant or team members (please see the How to Apply page for stipend eligibility requirements and other budgetary guidance). Projects focused around education or storytelling should explicitly state the plan for evaluating the impact of the work.

Source: RFP: Uncovering Human Origins in Asia and Africa

How China uses shipwrecks to weave a history of seaborne trade that backs up its construction of a new maritime Silk Road

via South China Morning Post, 29 November 2017: The Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Underwater Cultural Heritage is currently underway in Hong Kong, with many participants from Southeast Asia. This report from the SCMP focuses on China’s emerging role as a leader in maritime archaeology and its potential implications for its power.

This week, more than 100 of the region’s leading marine archaeologists from 23 nations convened at the Hong Kong Maritime Museum for the Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Underwater Cultural Heritage. At the opening reception on Monday night, the meteoric rise of China as a force in maritime archaeology was one of the popular topics of discussion.

Source: How China uses shipwrecks to weave a history of seaborne trade that backs up its construction of a new maritime Silk Road

Follow the Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Underwater Cultural Heritage #apconf2017

The Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Underwater Cultural Heritage is currently underway in Hong Kong until the end of the week. If you are on Twitter you can follow the proceedings with the hashtah #apconf2017 (or see the feed below)

New Paper: Rock art and the colonisation of Southeast Asia

Over the past decade, archaeologists have been able to directly date rock art, particularly in Island Southeast Asia at sites in East Kalimantan, East Timor and South Sulawesi. The dates of rock art indicate that modern humans were creating rock art during the Pleistocene, comparable to similar rock art in Europe. In this paper by Aubert et al., the authors note that the presence of these sites and dates now begs the question, did the ability to create rock art move out of Africa with human migrations, or did it erupt independently in different parts of the world? Also within Island Southeast Asia, did rock art develop from a specific place and spread throughout prehistoric Sahul, or did it arise independently among different communities in the region?

Recent technological developments in scientific dating methods and their applications to a broad range of materials have transformed our ability to accurately date rock art. These novel breakthroughs in turn are challenging and, in some instances, dramatically changing our perceptions of the timing and the nature of the development of rock art and other forms of symbolic expression in various parts of the late Pleistocene world. Here we discuss the application of these methods to the dating of rock art in Southeast Asia, with key implications for understanding the pattern of recent human evolution and dispersal outside Africa.

The Timing and Nature of Human Colonization of Southeast Asia in the Late Pleistocene: A Rock Art Perspective – Current Anthropology
https://doi.org/10.1086/694414

The race to save up to 50 shipwrecks from looters in Southeast Asia

via The Conversation, 16 November 2017:

More than 48 shipwrecks have been illicitly salvaged – and the figure may be much higher. Museums can play a key role in the protection of these wrecks, alongside strategic recovery and legislative steps.

Source: The race to save up to 50 shipwrecks from looters in Southeast Asia