New law on Philippine National Museum as the ‘primary keeper’ of Filipino heritage one step closer to being passed

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National Museum of the Philippines. Source: Rappler, 07 August 2018

via Rappler, 07 August 2018: The Philippine senate has voted on its third unanimously to pass a law strengthening the National Museum as the ‘keeper of Filipino Heritage’. The bill still has several administrative steps to complete, including approval by the president before it becomes law.

If the bill becomes law, the National Museum will be tasked with acquiring documents as well as preserving, exhibiting, and fostering research of artworks, cultural, and historical artifacts that represent Filipino heritage and the country’s natural history.

The law will also allow the National Museum to retain and use all income derived from all its operations nationwide and overseas. This will grant it more flexibility in generating and spending its income to fund redevelopment.

Source: National Museum will be ‘primary keeper’ of Filipino heritage

Ancient Thai Artifacts Returned by American Collector

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via Khaosod English, 02 August 2018: The ceramics returned were from Ban Chiang. Thailand previously repatriated Ban Chiang ceramics from the Bowers Museum in 2014, and is still looking at 14 more artifacts housed in the Honolulu Museum of art.

Prehistoric artifacts dating back thousands of years to some of the earliest people in Southeast Asia have been returned to Thailand by an American collector, officials announced Thursday.

Source: Ancient Thai Artifacts Returned by American Collector
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Angkor exhibition at Asian Civilisations Museum extended till July 29

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via The Straits Times, 09 July 2018:

Lifestyle News -SINGAPORE – The Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM) has extended its exhibition Angkor: Exploring Cambodia’s Sacred City by a week till July 29, 2018.. Read more at straitstimes.com.

Source: Angkor exhibition at Asian Civilisations Museum extended till July 29, Lifestyle News & Top Stories – The Straits Times

An almost forgotten glory

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via Bangkok Post, 28 June 2018

It was a fine sunny day when more than 70 culture vultures strolled the old Front Palace (Wang Na), the palace of viceroys in the early Rattanakosin period, near Sanam Luang, to learn about its history, importance and changes. Anyone wanting to know the old palace as more than just the National Museum Bangkok can follow the footsteps of the recent “Walk With The Cloud: The Hidden Palace”, led by Khun Sirikitiya Jensen, an official of the Fine Arts Department and the youngest daughter of Princess Ubolratana.

Source: An almost forgotten glory

SOAS statue: school denies it was smuggled, but provenance has not yet been established

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via The Nation, 16 June 2018: SOAS denies that the donated statue was smuggled but critics point out that the provenance of the statue is lacking, or at least has not yet been established (see other links at the end of this post).

London’s School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) has denied claims the prestigious institution possesses a 13th-century sculpture likely smuggled from Thailand

Source: Thai Buddha statue not smuggled: SOAS – The Nation

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Bringing back the forgotten palace

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via Bangkok Post, 12 June 2018: Wang Na, or the Front Palace, is more commonly known as the National Museum in Bangkok.

While the Grand Palace is world famous for its palatial architecture, the old Front Palace, or Wang Na, of ancient viceroys is hidden in obscurity although its beauty is second to none. Today it is just known simply as the National Museum Bangkok, rather than a palace with deep historical and artistic significance.

Source: Bringing back the forgotten palace

Visiting the National Museum of Natural History? Here’s what to expect

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via The Inquirer, 10 June 2018:

Even as only four of its 12 galleries were open to visitors on the opening weekend of the National Museum of Natural History in Manila, it didn’t deter the thousands of visitors who came, curious to check out the impressive structure and the artifacts displayed within.

Source: Visiting the National Museum of Natural History? Here’s what to expect | Inquirer Lifestyle

Features from Royal Crematorium divided, on display across country

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via The Nation, 07 June 2018:

The deconstruction of the King Rama IX’s Royal Crematorium is completed and the Culture Ministry’s Fine Arts Department has relocated some components for display at various palaces and museums around the country, Deputy Prime Minister Visanu Krua-ngam announced at Government House on Wednesday.

Source: Features from Royal Crematorium divided, on display across country – The Nation

[Job]: Collections Assistant (Asian Anthropology)

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Application deadline is 10 June 2018. Details and link below.

Collections Assistant (Asian Anthropology) (Fixed Term) in the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge.
The Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (MAA) is one of the nine University of Cambridge Museums and Botanic Garden (UCM). It is a sub-Department of the University Department of Social Anthropology and is a key resource for University teaching and research, particularly in collaboration with the Departments of Social Anthropology and Archaeology. Its world-class collections attract visiting researchers from all over the world and it maintains an active programme of temporary exhibitions and loans to major exhibitions within the UK and internationally. MAA’s collections are Designated for their national and international importance. For further information about the Museum’s staff, collections, and programmes, see www.maa.cam.ac.uk.

The Museum has embarked on a partnership with the Cambridge Rivers Project, aimed at researching and making accessible the extensive collections of artefacts from Asia for which it cares. Approximately 80,000 artefacts, 50,000 photographs and a rich documentary archive chart Cambridge’s role in archaeological and anthropological research across the continent, from the 1880s and through the twentieth century. The stories they contain are of importance to communities, scholars and publics worldwide as well as in Britain, illuminating the diversity of human experience and creativity, as well as complex shared histories of cross-cultural encounter that MAA is committed to telling. For more information on the Cambridge Rivers Project and its activities, see www.cambridgerivers.com

To support this project, MAA is seeking to appoint a full-time Collections Assistant (Asian Anthropology) for one year to work with Senior Curator for Anthropology Dr Mark Elliott, Collections Manager for Anthropology Rachel Hand, and researchers from the Cambridge Rivers Project to document, photograph and research collections from East, Southeast and South Asia, predominantly in the anthropology collections. The role will involve facilitating research access and supporting the work of the Cambridge Rivers Project, maintaining appropriate standards of documentation and collections care, and carrying out research to improve knowledge of the collections.

The successful candidate will have an understanding of and interest in museum collections with a background in Asian anthropology, archaeology or a related discipline, and demonstrated experience of object research. Knowledge of a relevant language is desirable. S/he will have very good IT skills including spreadsheets and basic word processing and experience with collections management systems. Excellent attention to detail and very good written and verbal communication skills are essential as well as excellent organisational skills and the ability to work independently and as part of a team.

Source: http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/17533/