Need a Date? Beta Analytic is giving away AMS dates in a raffle

We are inviting all undergrad and postgrad students who need radiocarbon dating to join our raffle. We are giving away five (5) AMS dates worth US$595 each. The raffle is open to all students in Europe, Africa, Asia Pacific, North America and South America. We will select one winner per region.

To join the raffle, please fill out the form found in our raffle page which requires a description of your research that needs AMS dating. Winners are required to show proof of enrollment for any semester in 2018. For details, please visit https://www.radiocarbon.com/raffle.htm

Radiocarbon Date Raffle | Beta Analytic

Funding Opportunity: Baldwin Fellowship Funded by the National Geographic Society

We are pleased to announce that The Leakey Foundation has partnered with the National Geographic Society to provide additional Baldwin Fellowship funding for paleoanthropology students from South, Southeast, and East Asia. This partnership will allow us to award more Baldwin Fellowships per year and will further help us provide students with the opportunity to get advanced education and training in paleoanthropology.

The countries included in this new opportunity are Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, East Timor, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam.

Source: The Leakey Foundation | Baldwin Fellows Funded by the National Geographic Society

Postdoctoral Fellowships “Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices” (Forum Transregionale Studien, Berlin)

The Berlin-based Forum Transregionale Studien invites scholars to apply for up to six postdoctoral fellowships within the framework of the research program Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices. Kunstgeschichte und Ästhetische Praktiken for the academic year 2018/19.

Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices is a research and fellowship program which questions and transcends traditional disciplinary boundaries of art history in a transcultural, global horizon. By creating a space of dialogue for university and museum scholars from all -regions, it aims to discuss the potentials and contours of a plural
history of art. It especially invites scholars from Islamic, Asian, African, Australian, European art histories and the art histories of the Americas, to join the program, but also addresses neighboring disciplines such as Archaeology, Anthropology, History, Aesthetics and other fields dealing with the history of visual and material cultures. Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices analyses the connectivity of larger historical spaces in a transregional perspective and investigates artistic and aesthetic practices and the history of artifacts in a comparative approach, experimenting with new methodologies, forms of collaborative research and curatorial practices. The concept of Aesthetic Practices introduced by this program, is an invitation to study artifacts with their biographies as well as processes of transfer and transformation in a transcultural, postcolonial and global perspective. The program has no chronological or geographical constraints. It collaborate with the Berlin State Museums, the Berlin universities, as well as other international and national academic partners, and aims at an intense interaction of art  historical institutions.

Its scholarly environment is designed to enable and encourage both fellows and the wider community to experiment and refine transregional approaches to the history of visual cultures and aesthetic practices.

Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices is an initiative of the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence (KHI), Max-Planck-Institute at the Forum Transregionale Studien, Berlin. Art Histories is directed by Hannah Baader and Gerhard Wolf and cooperates with the program Connecting Art Histories in the Museum (Berlin State Museums/ KHI Florenz).

Candidates

Applicants should have obtained their doctorate within the last seven years (before their application). We welcome applications from all regions, with various disciplinary backgrounds, such as Art Histories, Archaeologies, Anthropology, Aesthetics, History, and all relevant neighboring fields dealing with artifacts, artistic production, material culture, and aesthetic practices relating to objects, images and architectures. Applicants should be interested to engage in reflexive and transdisciplinary research. Art Histories fellows are given the opportunity to pursue their individual research projects within a transdisciplinary and transregional context. They are expected to engage in the program activities, such as regular seminars, workshops, conferences and a travelling seminar.

In the overall context of the Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices program and the framework of the Forum Transregionale Studien, the fellows will be part of a creative, intellectually stimulating and discursive environment.

Fellowships

The fellowhip starts on 1 October 2018 and ends on 31 July 2019. In particular cases, shorter fellowship terms may be considered. Postdoctoral fellows will receive a monthly stipend of EUR 2.500 plus supplements depending on their personal situation.

Organizational support regarding visas, insurances, housing, etc. will be provided. Successful applicants become fellows of the program Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices at the Forum Transregionale Studien and are expected to take up residence in Berlin.

Application Procedure

To apply, please send the following documents exclusively by e-mail as seperate word or PDF files:

– a curriculum vitae (in English)
– a project description (no longer than five pages / in English)
– a sample of scholarly work (about 20 pages of an article, conference
paper, or dissertation chapter)
– names of two referees (including their e-mail addresses)

The complete application should be submitted latest by 15 January 2018 and addressed to arthistories_application@trafo-berlin.de

Successful candidates will be notified by April 2018. Information about the current status of the evaluation process will be published on the website www.arthistories.de.

Institutional Framework

Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. The research program is integrated in the Berlin-based Forum Transregionale Studien, a research platform that connects systematic and regionspecific questions, addressing entanglements and interactions beyond national, cultural or regional frames. The Forum works in tandem with established institutions and networks, that are engaged in transregional studies and is supported by an association of directors of universities, research institutes and networks mostly based in Berlin.

The Forum Transregionale Studien cooperates with the Max Weber Stiftung and is funded by a public-private partnership.

The call for applications is depending on the provision of funding.

Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices collaborates closely with the following Berlin based institutions:
– Berlin State Museums, Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation
– Freie Universität Berlin, Department for Art Histories
– Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Department of Art and Visual History
– ICI Berlin Institute for Cultural Inquiry

Contact

Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices
c/o Forum Transregionale Studien
Wallotstrasse 14
14193 Berlin
Germany
arthistories@trafo-berlin.de

RFP: Uncovering Human Origins in Asia and Africa

Grant opportunity by the National Geographic Society for human origins research, including within Southeast Asia. Deadline is on 3 January 2018

For more than 50 years, the National Geographic Society has supported exploration into the evolution of humankind. Our grants have led to hundreds of new discoveries in paleoanthropology, paleolithic archaeology, molecular anthropology, and paleoecology that have fundamentally changed the understanding of our own species. As we consider that legacy, we look to those areas of the planet where little is known about human origins, and we seek to invest in new ideas, projects, and explorers in and from these regions. The goal of this fund is to encourage more investigation of hominid evolution in Africa and Asia, with preference given to projects in relatively unexplored parts of those continents. Preference will also be given to applicants who are residents or citizens of the country of fieldwork as well as to projects with strong local capacity development components.

Priority will be given to projects that aim to do one or more of the following:

  • Discover or explore new paleoanthropological fossil sites in Africa or Asia, particularly those in Central and West Africa and those in East, Southeast, South, and Central Asia
  • Increase understanding of the biological, cultural, or ecological parameters of human origins in Africa or Asia
  • Develop local capacity in human origins exploration in Africa or Asia

Applicants may request up to US $50,000, though grants are typically funded for less than US $30,000. Up to 20 percent of the requested amount can be used as stipends for the applicant or team members (please see the How to Apply page for stipend eligibility requirements and other budgetary guidance). Projects focused around education or storytelling should explicitly state the plan for evaluating the impact of the work.

Source: RFP: Uncovering Human Origins in Asia and Africa

Funds available for emergency conservation of documentary heritage – Prince Claus Fund

Passing on a funding opportunity by the Prince Claus Fund, which offers funding for documentary heritage that has come under urgent need for preservation in emergency situations. Projects in Asia are eligible for funding. Full details in the link below.

The Prince Claus Fund, through its Cultural Emergency Response programme (CER), and the Whiting Foundation announce a new call for proposals for projects in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean to safeguard documentary heritage that is acutely threatened by recent conflict or other disaster, whether natural or man-made.

Source: Prince Claus Fund – Activities

PhD Opportunity in Stone Artefact Archaeology

PhD opportunity in Australia to study stone artefacts in Myanmar and Southeast Asia. Details below.

FULLY FUNDED PHD OPPORTUNITY IN STONE ARTEFACT ARCHAEOLOGY IN MAINLAND SOUTHEAST ASIA

THE POSITION
Applications are invited for a fully funded PhD position in archaeology, within the Centre for Archaeological Science (CAS), University of Wollongong (UOW). The successful candidate will join a multi-disciplinary project that is seeking to generate new data related to the Late Pleistocene colonisation of Asia and Australasia by modern humans (Homo sapiens) and other archaic hominins present in the region at this time. This forms part of the ARC Australian Future Fellowship project led by Dr Ben Marwick, The archaeology of Thailand and Myanmar: A Strategic Region for Understanding Modern Human Colonization and Interactions Across our Region. This project is linked to Prof Richard ‘Bert’ Roberts’ ARC Australian Laureate Fellowship Out of Asia: unique insights into human evolution and interactions using frontier technologies in archaeological science. To address substantial questions concerning early modern human colonisation and adaptation in mainland Southeast Asia, we are developing a number of innovative archaeological-science techniques, and are assembling a research group with strengths in artefact analysis, geochronology, geoarchaeology, and archaeological chemistry.

The PhD candidate will study stone artefact assemblages to engage with major global and regional archaeological questions relating to the timing and nature of human activity during the Late Pleistocene in Southeast Asia and the wider region. The position will involve overseas fieldwork in Myanmar and an intensive, laboratory-based analytical research program. The candidate will be expected to help develop and apply novel techniques for analysing stone artefacts, and conduct an experimental program.

The candidate will receive a tax-free stipend of AUD 25,849 per year (indexed annually), for three and a half years. Research funding opportunities are available, with candidates encouraged to apply for the various university-wide schemes available at UOW and CAS. For more details, see http://www.uow.edu.au/research/rsc/prospective/index.html

THE INSTITUTION
CAS was established at UOW in 2010 to develop, integrate and apply modern scientific techniques to answer fundamental questions about human evolution and the analysis of material remains of past human life and activities. CAS is affiliated with the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (SEES), bringing together researchers drawn from the physical, chemical, biological and geological sciences in partnership with science-based archaeologists. This means that there is plenty of scope to interact and collaborate with experts from across the Earth Sciences, and indeed PhD candidates are encouraged to do so.

CAS possesses a world-leading laboratory for archaeological science, equipped with state-of-the-art instrumentation for microscopy, compositional analyses and dating. CAS members have produced high-profile publications in the field of archaeological science. We have ongoing collaborations with experts in statistics and other departments at UOW; combined with the departmental expertise, this provides an exciting research environment with many opportunities for collaborative work. For more details about CAS, see http://cas.uow.edu.au/index.html

REQUIREMENTS
Candidates are expected to hold a first class undergraduate degree, preferably Honours (or equivalent), in Archaeology, Archaeological Science, or a related discipline. For US applicants a GPA of 3.8 or higher, and field experience, is expected. Desirable, but not essential details for all applicants, include: authorship of scholarly publications; a relevant post-graduate qualification in Archaeology or a related discipline; prior experience analysing stone artefacts; international fieldwork experience; and CRM/consulting experience.
Applicants will need to show an aptitude for analytical and experimental research, and must be proficient in English. The successful applicant will be fully committed to conducting independent and original scientific research, while also collaborating with others in the CAS team. The PhD candidate will be expected to disseminate this research in peer-reviewed journal articles and conference presentations, as well as in their final PhD thesis. They will be encouraged to undertake training in relevant analytical techniques and must be willing to conduct overseas fieldwork, in sometimes challenging environments.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE
If you are interested in applying for this position and satisfy the above requirements, then please contact Dr Ben Marwick by email to discuss your application and details of the application procedure. The deadline for full applications is 23rd October 2015, and the successful candidate is expected to begin work in early 2016.
Dr Ben Marwick
Senior Research Fellow,
Centre for Archaeological Science (CAS),
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences,
Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health,
University of Wollongong,
Wollongong, NSW 2522,
AUSTRALIA
E: bmarwick@uow.edu.au

ISEAA award for early career Southeast Asian Archaeologists

Nominations are being sought for an Early Career Research Award, open to recent PhD recipients in the field of Southeast Asian Archaeology. Deadline is 1 December 2015.

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The Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology is pleased to announce the establishment of the first international award in the discipline of Southeast Asian archaeology.

The ISEAA Early Career Award will be open to nominees who have defended their dissertations and received Ph.D. degrees within the five year period from August 31, 2010 to September 1, 2015. An award committee of distinguished scholars will select the awardee based on a single peer-reviewed article or chapter, published within five years of the lead author’s receipt of doctorate, that exemplifies excellent application of current archaeological theory to Southeast Asian data.

Selection/Evaluation Criteria: Submitted material will be evaluated and ranked by committee members on factors including originality and quality of research and strengths of application of current archaeological theory to Southeast Asian data. Both mainland (Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Myanmar [Burma], and Malay peninsula) and island (island Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, East Timor, Brunei, and Singapore) are included.

Who Is Eligible to Submit Nominations: Nominations may be made by any professional archaeologist who holds a PhD. Self-nominations of eligible candidates are strongly encouraged.

Nomination/Submission Materials Required: Nomination letters should be submitted by email to the committee chair and include a PDF of the article or chapter, a two-page letter that includes the lead author’s current address and a scholarly description of why the publication is an exemplary application of current archaeological theory to Southeast Asian data. Only one publication per nominee will be accepted.

Full details of the award here.

PhD Scholarship in Geoarchaeology + Short course opportunity

A PhD scholarship position is available at the University of Wollongong, Australia, focusing on geoarchaeology related to a project investigating the colonisation of Asia and Australasia by modern humans during the late Pleistocene. The deadline for applications is 31 July 2015.

Applications are invited for a fully funded PhD position within the Centre for Archaeological Science (CAS), University of Wollongong (UOW). The successful candidate will join a multi-disciplinary project that is seeking to generate new data related to the Late Pleistocene colonisation of Asia and Australasia by modern humans (Homo sapiens) and other archaic hominins present in the region at this time. This forms part of the Australian Research Council (ARC) Laureate Fellowship project led by Prof. Richard ‘Bert’ Roberts, ‘Out of Asia: unique insights into human evolution and interactions using frontier technologies in archaeological science’. To address important questions concerning the origins of our species we are developing a number of innovative archaeological science techniques, focussed on combining archaeo-chemical, geochronological and geoarchaeological research strands.

The geoarchaeological component of this project is focussing on spatially-resolved data acquisition at the micro-scale, linking on-site indicators of environmental change to the wider dynamics of the Quaternary landscape and climate systems. We are interested in how hominins interacted with the environments in which they lived, and the directionality of these interrelationships. Archaeological sediments are laid down and post-depositionally modified through the complex interplay between a broad range of geomorphic and anthropogenic processes. These processes leave behind diagnostic signatures that can be sought and identified at the micro-scale, allowing for additional dimensions of data to supplement more traditional field and laboratory techniques. The position will involve overseas fieldwork at archaeological sites in Southeast Asia, and an intensive, laboratory-based analytical research program.

Download more information here (pdf file)

Also, the Centre for Archaeological Research at the University of Wollongong is organising a short course from 16-20th November on Micromorphology.

A 1-week intensive, hands-on short course focussing on the application of micromorphology to the interpretation of archaeological and palaeoenvironmental sequences.

Course information can be downloaded here (pdf file)

PhD Scholarship: Collecting practices through Southeast Asian materials

The British Museum and SOAS are jointly offering a PhD scholarship to study the history of collecting in Southeast Asia in the 19-20th centuries. A really interesting subject, but available only to UK/EU applicants. Deadline is 28 April 2015.

AHRC-funded project studentship in Department of Asia at the British Museum and the Department of History of Art and Archaeology at SOAS

The Department of Asia at the British Museum and the Department of History of Art and Archaeology at SOAS invite applications from suitably qualified UK/EU candidates for a full-time, 3-year Collaborative Doctoral Award funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council on the subject of ‘Thick provenance: interactions between European and Southeast Asian collecting practices refracted through the lens of the mainland Southeast Asia material at the British Museum.’

The project is a critical and comparative history of collecting in mainland Southeast Asia in the 19th-20th centuries. It proposes to examine the biographies of the British Museum’s mainland Southeast Asian collections, comprising analysis of modes of object ownership, perceptions of value, and exchange practices with reference to accumulation of family heirlooms and communal palladia (sources of protection and legitimation), as well as diverse modes of object circulation.

The mainland Southeast Asian collections at the British Museum contain lowland Buddhist objects, lacquerware, weapons and knives, archaeological material, pipes, and coins and banknotes, which are largely well-catalogued. More extensive, however, is the body of highland ethnographic material, including textiles and objects of daily use, such as baskets, which have not been thoroughly catalogued or researched. These objects come from the wide panoply of peoples, from the Chin and Naga in the western areas to the Shan, Karenni and Lahu of the eastern and central ones, who live in the mountainous regions of Southeast Asia and are not confined by national borders. Little is known about how these objects were collected and used locally and regionally, the roles they played within their local communities, or the means by which they were collected and arrived at the British Museum. It is anticipated that the student will focus upon this latter body of material for the PhD in order to provide a better understanding of object usage and ownership within regional and group relations, as well as the interactions between Europeans and locals at the time of collection.

Details here.

PhD Scholarship researching ancient seafaring to Australasia

Potential PhD students take note, a scholarship to study at the University of Southampton to investigate seafaring to Australasia. Deadline is 13 April 2015 but scholarship is limited to UK or EU students only.

PhD studentship in Prehistoric Archaeology and Oceanography: Exploitation of prevailing winds and currents by the earliest known seafarers, reaching and colonizing Australasia c.50,000 years ago

Applications are invited for a three-year PhD studentship in the Faculty of Humanities in collaboration with the Faculty of Natural and Environmental Science at the University of Southampton. This studentship is funded through an SMMI Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholarship Award, to start October 2015. The successful candidate will work under the supervision of Dr Helen Farr (Archaeology), Prof Robert Marsh (Ocean and Earth Science) and Dr Ivan Haigh (Ocean and Earth Science).

Around the modern world, migration is a politically charged issue, however, migration is an ancient phenomenon. Long-distance maritime migration can be seen as early as 60-50,000 years ago, with the movement of Anatomically Modern Humans from the Sunda basin (southeast Asia) to Sahul (Australasia). The archaeological record of early settlement is limited, but evidence suggests short crossings from southeast Asia to Papua New Guinea and northern Australia at a time when sea levels reached c.60-80 m lower than today. This project brings reconstructions of past climate and ocean currents alongside archaeological evidence for the human colonization of Australasia, to better understand how ancient human migration was both a response, and a solution, to social and environmental challenges. Simulations of palaeo ocean drift in the region will be developed and used to investigate ancient seafaring.

Details here.