Exhibition on ancient Ha Long culture

The Quang Ninh Museum and the National Museum of Vietnamese Revolution in Hanoi have launched a month-long exhibition showcasing prehistoric Ha Long culture, located in the vicinity of Ha Long bay and city.

25 April 2007 (Viet Nam Net Bridge) – The Quang Ninh Museum and the National Museum of Vietnamese Revolution in Hanoi have launched a month-long exhibition showcasing prehistoric Ha Long culture, located in the vicinity of Ha Long bay and city.

Vietnam Net Bridge, 25 Apr 2007

Ancient Ha Long culture exhibited in Hanoi

Ha Long city is widely famous for its beautiful Ha Long Bay. But few know that it is also the site of an uninterrupted ancient culture dating from the first period of the Stone Age, no less than 5,000 years ago.

Of a series of archeological items discovered within the past 20 years, there are bones of ancient Vietnamese. These suggest that ancient Ha Long culture is an endogenous culture, which was doubted by some famous foreign archeologists in the first half of the 20th century such as M. Colani (France), and J.G. Andersson (Sweden).

All of the cultural layers unearthed at 34 sites throughout Quang Ninh Province contain countless vestiges of ancient Vietnamese. Though human bones weren’t found in those well-known sites (Ba Vung, Bai Tu Long, and Bo Chuyen), in 2001, in the Hon Hai – Co Tien are in Ha Long city, archeologists discovered 43 graves of ancient Vietnamese as well as jewelry, ceramic works and working tools.

This discovery has since then dispersed any doubt about the endogenous ancient Ha Long culture. It also shows that 3,500 years ago, Ha Long culture was at its peak. Humans who knew how to create working tools started to explore the sea and trade with those from other areas.


Related Books:
Some references to the Ha Long culture can be found in
Southeast Asia: From Prehistory to History by P. S. Bellwood and I. Glover (Eds)
The Bronze Age of Southeast Asia (Cambridge World Archaeology) by C. Higham

Art exhibition showcases Borobudur

The greatest Buddhist monument on the face of the earth becomes the subject of a visual art exhibition to held in Jogjakarta from April 20 to May 9.

21 April 2007 (Antara) – The greatest Buddhist monument on the face of the earth becomes the subject of a visual art exhibition to held in Jogjakarta from April 20 to May 9.

Indonesia, Unesco hold expo on Borobudur temple

Indonesia`s Cultural and Tourism Ministry and The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) organized a visual art exhibition entitled `The Thousand Mysteries of Borobudur` in Yogyakarta.

“This expo marks the revival of Borobudur through visual art performances from various works of arts,” Jogja Gallery Curator Mikke Susanto said when opening the exhibition at the Jogja Gallery, here late Friday.

The expo displays various paintings, statues, graphics, photography, and videos depicting the Borobudur Temple.

Visitors of the exhibition could get a picture about the Borobudur Temple in the past, before and after the restoration.

The exhibition will last from April 20 to May 9, 2007, at the Jogja Gallery, Yogyakarta northern square.


Related Books:
The Restoration of Borobudur (World Heritage Series)
The Lost Temple of Java (History/Journey’s Into the Past) by P. Grabsky
The Mysteries of Borobudur: Discover Indonesia Series by J. N. Miksic
Borobudur by L. Frederic and J. Nou
Borobudur: Golden Tales of the Buddhas (Periplus Travel Guides) by J. Miksic

Terengganu Scripted Stone Exhibited In Jakarta

15 December 2006 (Bernama) – Just in case you’e not familiar with the geography, Terengganu is a state in (peninsular) Malaysia, and Jakarta is the capital of Indonesia.

Terengganu Scripted Stone Exhibited In Jakarta

The Terengganu Scripted Stone 1903, the artefact that shows the advent of Islam to the Peninsula, is one of the archeological artefacts which will be exhibited during the Titian Budaya Malaysia-Indonesia exhibition from Dec 16 to 18 here.

Museum Department Director-General Datuk Dr Adi Taha said, the scripted stone would be exhibited at a special exhibition organised by the department at the main lobby of the Jakarta Convention Centre (JCC) in conjunction with the Titian Budaya programme there.

“We shall also exhibit the Avalokiteswara Buddha (the Buddha with eight arms) and the Aceh Tombstone, he told Bernama at the programme’s Secretariat office here.

Thai antiquities unveiled to show true face of Buddhist culture

From the storeroom of the National Museum of Vietnamese History, an exhibition of Buddhist antiquities from Thailand.

10 November 2006 (Vietnam Net Bridge) – From the storeroom of the National Museum of Vietnamese History, an exhibition of Buddhist antiquities from Thailand.

Vietnam Net Bridge, 10 Nov 2006

Thai antiquities unveiled to show true face of Buddhist culture

Starting today, visitors will have chance to admire 200 objects for either domestic or ritual use, including abundant amounts of ceramic, bronze and wood materials dated from 19th and 20th centuries all the way back to the 4th century BC.

The domestic section presents the collection of complex decorated ceramic wares made of many precious pottery materials like Sawankalok plates, celadon glazed ceramics or polychrome enamel fruit trays. Most of the displayed objects project Buddhist motifs or were used in offerings to Buddha.


Related Books:
Origins Of Thai Art by B. Gosling
The Arts of Thailand by S. Van Beek and L. Invernizzi
The Buddhist World of Southeast Asia (Suny Series in Religion) by D. K. Swearer

Podcast: Treasures of the South China Sea

It’s the first SEAArch podcast! We go on-location to the Aquaria @ KLCC, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to bring you a first-hand look at the Treasures of the South China Sea exhibition, on now until the end of this month.

It’s the first SEAArch podcast! We go on-location to the Aquaria @ KLCC, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to bring you a first-hand look at the Treasures of the South China Sea exhibition, on now until the end of this month. Please leave comments and feedback!

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Transcript

It’s a hazy day in Kuala Lumpur, and we are on our way to the KLCC where the famous Petronas towers are standing. The Petronas towers are currently the tallest buildings in the world, but we’re not going up the towers today, instead we are heading underground and back in time.

The Treasures of the South China Sea exhibition at the Aquaria is a rare chance to get up close and personal with artefacts dating as far back as one thousand years. Organised by Nanhai Marine Archaeology and supported by the Malaysia Department of Museums, the exhibition showcases artefacts retrieved from ten shipwrecks found in the waters of Malaysia.

In chronological order, the ten shipwrecks are: The Tanjung Simpang, Turiang, Nanyang, Longquan, Royal Nanhai, Xuande, Singtai, Wanli, Anantes and Desaru. The wrecks are named arbitrarily, sometimes named after their present locations and at other times named after some characteristic feature. They date from the 10th century right up to the 19th century and cover the Chinese dynasties of Song, Yuan, Ming and Qing.

Most of the pieces in the exhibition are on sale and collectors interested in owning a piece of history might be interested in buying a gong, a bowl or a pair of spoons from the Desaru shipwreck. For my part – and my meagre budget – I got a miniature celadon jarlet retrieved from the Royal Nanhai wreck that dates to around 1450. I also bought a book on Malaysian Shipwrecks.

The company behind the retrieval of these artefacts, Nanhai Marine Archaeology, works very closely with the Malaysian Department of Museums. Sten Sjostrand, the principle investigator and founder of the company sees himself as a marine archaeologist rather than a treasure hunter or antique dealer. Unfortunately, I didn’t have a chance to speak with him when I was there, but from what I hear, he’s really passionate about his work and so hopefully we can hear from him in another podcast.

The Museums Department gets its choice of artefacts and 30% of the retrieved finds, and the remaining 70% are sold by the company. The money raised is used to fund future marine expeditions. This exhibition is special, however, because it may be one of the last ever and so if you have the time, you should make the trip down because Mr Sjostrand is said to be retiring.

The Treasures of the South China Sea Exhibition is on at the Aquaria at KLCC until the end of October. For more information, you can visit Nanhai Marine Archaeology’s website at www.mingwrecks.com and don’t forget to visit the SEAArch website at S-E-double A-R-C-H dot wordpress dot com for a full transcript of this podcast and more news and resources on the archaeology of Southeast Asia.

Music for this podcast was by Gamelan Nyai Saraswati from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. You can send your comments, feedback and suggestions to seaarch@gmail.com. Until next time, this is Noel signing off for the SEAArch podcast.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 License.

Related Books:
Shipwrecks and Sunken Treasure in Southeast Asia by T. Wells
Oriental trade ceramics in Southeast Asia, 10th to 16th century: Selected from Australian collections, including the Art Gallery of South Australia and the Bodor Collection by J. Guy

Jewelries of ancient Vietnamese exhibited in HCM City

12 October 2006 (Vietnam Net Bridge, also Thanh Nien Daily and Nhan Dan)

Vietnam Net Bridge, 12 Oct 2006

Jewelries of ancient Vietnamese exhibited in HCM City

An exhibition displaying 500 pieces of ancient Vietnamese women’s jewelry kicks off today at the Southern Women’s Museum in HCM City.

At the exhibition, numerous jewelry collections of Vietnamese people who lived during the time of the Phung Nguyen, Dong Son, Sa Huynh and Oc Eo cultures will be showcased. These collections consist of a large number of different kinds of jewelries such as stone ear rings, hairpins, bracelets, bronze mirrors and glass necklaces.


Related Books:
Jewelry of Southeast Asia by A. Richter

How artists view Sapa’s ancient rock carvings

20 September 2006 (Vietnam Net Bridge) – This article has made me change my “cave drawings” category to “Cave Art / Rock Art”.

Vietnam Net Bridge, 20 Sep 2006

How artists view Sapa’s ancient rock carvings

Artistic interpretations of the strange rock carvings around Sapa are the theme of a photographic exhibition organized by the Fine Arts Institute, the Southeast Prehistory Center and the Lao Cai Department of Culture and Information at the Hanoi University of Fine Arts until the end of September.

Lung Leng: window to prehistoric time

A larger feature on the Lung Leng archaeological site in the central highlands of Vietnam, with a larger range of photographs of the artefacts found there.

3 September 2006 (Viet Nam Net Bridge) – A larger feature on the Lung Leng archaeological site in the central highlands of Vietnam, with a larger range of photographs of the artefacts found there.

Viet Nam Net Bridge, 3 September 2006

Lung Leng: window to prehistoric time

Located on the left bank of the Po Co River, in Sa Binh Commune, Sa Thay District, Kon Tum Province, Lung Leng used to be a small gold mine. It was excavated in 1999 and 2001 on an area of 11,500 square meters and is one of Vietnam’s biggest-ever archaeological excavations.

In the second excavation archeologists found 20 relics with 14,552 stone objects, 224 pottery objects and 37 metal objects. 500 objects were sorted out into various collections of pottery, ornaments, Gong (cong chieng), alcohol jars, and ethnic costumes to be displayed in the HCM City Historical Museum. Many tools showing the indications of the Son Vi culture from the Paleolithic age were found in the Central Highlands for the first time.

Exhibition displays Central Highlands ancient artifacts

27 August 2006 (Viet Nam Net Bridge)

Exhibition displays Central Highlands ancient artifacts

The Vietnam Museum of History in Ho Chi Minh City, in coordination with the Kon Tum General Museum, opened an exhibition titled “Lung Leng – The Mystery of the Prehistoric Central Highlands” on August 26…

A collection of working tools from the paleolithic and neolithic eras, pottery and jewelry, trunk tombs, and many valuable photos and scientific documents on the Lung Leng site are also being displayed at the showroom, which will be open until November.

Shipwreck exhibition in Vietnam

An ongoing exhibition featuring shipwreck finds off the waters of Vietnam in the Can Tho Museum.

24 August 2006 (Viet Nam News) – An ongoing exhibition featuring shipwreck finds off the waters of Vietnam in the Can Tho Museum.

Viet Nam News, 24 August 2006

Exhibition of shipwreck relics begins in Can Tho Museum

An exhibition featuring 400 ancient relics salvaged from five shipwrecks off the Viet Nam coast opened at the Can Tho Museum on Tuesday.

Most of them are porcelain and pottery made in China, Thailand, and Viet Nam between the 15th and 18th centuries and are part of more than 500,000 items found aboard ancient vessels which had sunk off the Cham Island (Quang Nam Province), Dam Island (Kien Giang Province), Cau Island (Ba Ria-Vung Tau Province), Binh Thuan and Ca Mau provinces.