Cham tower to be studied

11 September 2007 (Thanh Nien News) – Not to be confused with the citadel found in the previous post, this Cham tower in the Thua Thien-Hue province is slated for archaeological investigation from next month until the end of the year.

Studies to be done on millennium-old Vietnam tower

Excavation will begin on a 1,000-year-old Cham tower complex in central Vietnam to study its architecture and explore if more relics lie undiscovered inside.

Continue reading “Cham tower to be studied”

Cham citadel unearthed in Vietnam

18 August 2007 (Nhan Dan, Viet Nam News) – An ancient Cham citadel is discovered in Southern province of Ba Ria-Vung Tau, along with some ceramic finds.

Ancient Cham citadel relics discovered

Archaeologists have unearthed relics of an ancient Cham citadel of thousands of years of age, which were buried about 1.5 m deep underground.

The site, located in Go Cat village, Phuoc Thuan commune, Xuyen Moc district in the southern coastal province of Ba Ria-Vung Tau, holds relics of a 400 m long and 300 m wide citadel built of laterite bricks.

Scientists from the Archaeological Centre under the Southeastern Institute of Social Sciences and the Ba Ria-Vung Tau Museum said they have found a number of ceramic pieces and tools of Cham designs believed to date between 1,400 and 1,600 years ago.

Ancient Cham citadel found in Ba Ria

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of an ancient Cham citadel in Xuyen Moc District in the southern province of Ba Ria-Vung Tau.

Buried at a depth of 1-1.5m in Go Cat Village, the brick citadel is 400m long and 300m wide and appears to have been built 1,400-1,600 years ago.

The experts from the southeastern region Archaeology Centre and the Ba Ria-Vung Tau Province General Museum also found several fragments of pottery items and tools.

They are seeking permission to carry out a comprehensive exploration of the site in mid-2008.

Vietnam's Ancient Son

A travel piece on the My Son Sanctuary in central Vietnam, once the spiritual centre of the Champa kingdom.

17 May 2007 (The Epoch Times) – A travel piece on the My Son Sanctuary in central Vietnam, once the spiritual centre of the Champa kingdom.

The Epoch Times, 17 May 2007

Vietnam’s Ancient Son

In a lush green valley in central Vietnam under the imposing glare of Cat’s Tooth Mountain rests one of the most important archaeological sites of the ancient kingdom of Champa.

It is unassuming, resilient and rich in history and beauty. One could well be describing Vietnam itself. In truth, the crumbling temples of My Son are just a speck on Vietnam’s kaleidoscope of indulgent cultural experiences.

But to walk through the secluded sanctuary of My Son, where the ancient monuments still stand proudly among the suffocating tropical growth, clear running streams and thick scent of surrounding coffee plantations, is a true test of the sensory overload that must be endured by all visitors to Vietnam.

My Son may not be one of the country’s most well-known attractions, but it can be one of its most rewarding. It is highly atmospheric, dramatic and dripping, not only in tropical humidity, but also the ancient spirit and architecture of Indian Hinduism blended into a typical South-East Asian terrain.

Read the full story here.

Related Books:
Southeast Asia: From Prehistory to History by P. S. Bellwood and I. Glover (Eds) has a chapter on the Champa polity
The Art of Champa by J. Hubert
Hindu-Buddhist Art Of Vietnam: Treasures From Champa by E. Guillon

Hindu artefacts unearthed in central Vietnam

The first find of its kind, a stone linga and yoni have been found in central Vietnam. The Lingam-Yoni find in central Vietnam is not surprising considering the kingdom of Champa in the 9th century was Saivite, and Shiva-Linga were often the focus of worship in Saivite temples.

10 May 2007 (Thanh Nien News) – The first find of its kind, a stone linga and yoni have been found in central Vietnam. The Linga is associated with the Hindu god, Shiva and its symbolism includes the fountain of life and phallus. The Yoni symbolises the source of all existence and the female genitalia. Collectively, they represent unification of male and female. The Lingam-Yoni find in central Vietnam is not surprising considering the kingdom of Champa in the 9th century was Saivite, and Shiva-Linga were often the focus of worship in Saivite temples.

20070510 Thanh Nien NEws

Rare ancient object found in Vietnam central province

A stone statue of worship dating back to the ninth century was unearthed Thursday in Vietnam’s central province of Binh Thuan, with local authorities saying the find is the first of its kind in the area.

According to Nguyen Xuan Ly, director of the provincial museum, the statue is called Linga and Yoni – a divine worship object depicting the male sex and female genitalia united in a representation of the fountain of life.


Related Books:
The Art of Champa by J. Hubert
Hindu-Buddhist Art Of Vietnam: Treasures From Champa by E. Guillon

Cham inscriptions and Cham manuscripts: A legacy of development

Cham inscriptions and Cham manuscripts: A legacy of developmentSpeaker: Mohamed Effendy bin Abdul Hamid
Date/Time: Sat 14 Apr 07, 2.30 – 4.30pm
Venue: National Library (Singapore), 100 Victoria Street, Possibility Room, Level 5The Vo Canh Stele is one of the earliest Sanskrit inscriptions found in Southeast Asia, in the vicinity of the kingdom of Champa, Vietnam. The inscription, dated to be from the fourth century, records the donation made by a King belonging to the family of Sri Mara. The significance of this inscription was that it was one of the earliest examples of the Pallava script being used in Southeast Asia by a Malay-like polity, Kerajaan Champa.

This seminar will highlight the localization of Sanskrit by the Cham people by contrasting it to other Cham inscriptions and the writing found in the Cham manuscripts. This will highlight that although the Cham language and writing show significant borrowings from other cultures, it actually enhanced the development of the Cham language.

Admission is FREE and no registration is required.

About the Speaker:
Mohamed Effendy bin Abdul Hamid is a postgraduate student in the National University of Singapore, Southeast Asia Studies Programme. His interest in Champa’s history began in the year 2000 and has been awarded a research grant in 2005 by National University of Singapore’s Graduate research programme to conduct fieldwork research in Cham communities in Vietnam and Cambodia. Mohamed Effendy has also participated and attended in several international conferences and symposiums such as “New scholarship on Champa”, 5-6 August 2004. He co-presented a paper with Research Associate Mr Pritam Singh on “The Muslims of Indochina: Islam, Ethnicity and Religious Education” and a paper “Cham Manuscripts and the Possibility of a Second Champa Kingdom” at the 19th International Association of Historians of Asia (IAHA) 2006 in the Philippines.

Related Books:
The Art of Champa by J. Hubert

Archaeological site unearthed in mountainous region

Prehistoric stone tool finds in a mountainous region of Vietnam, and a brief mention of Champa relics found in Hoi An.

30 November 2006 (Thanh Nien News) – Prehistoric stone tool finds in a mountainous region of Vietnam, and a brief mention of Champa relics found in Hoi An.

Thanh Nien News, 30 Nov 2006

Archaeological site unearthed in mountainous region

An excavation carried out in November by the institute in an area of 53 sq.m unearthed 127 relics, including 400 pottery fragments, stone tools, graters and fossilized sea animals dating back some 4,000 years.

Dr. Nguyen Gia Doi, an expert from the institute confirmed the site was a prehistoric labor tool-manufacturing center.

The site was unearthed last December 2005 in Dak Wil commune, Dak Nong’s Cu Jut district, he said.

Covering an area of 4ha, the archaeological site reportedly encompasses four relic zones, where remains from the Stone Age are said to lie.

The institute also asked the Dak Nong provincial administration to take measures to protect the site, pending further excavations.

New discoveries at Duong Long towers

Bas-reliefs are uncovered at the base of the Duong Long towers, along with other finds including pottery.

10 November 2006 (Vietnam Net Bridge) – Bas-reliefs are uncovered at the base of the Duong Long towers, along with other finds including pottery.

Vietnam Net Bridge, 10 Nov 2006

New discoveries at Duong Long towers

Archeologists digging around the base of the three mighty Duong Long towers in Binh Dinh Province have greatly expanded their knowledge of the ancient Champa people. In the second excavation by the provincial museum, the archeologists found more than 1,000 bas-reliefs, pieces of pottery and other objects. They are yet to be classified.

The experts guess that the three towers together had entombed someone important since, to the modern-day Cham people, a tower was often the crematorium for a deceased Champa monarch. Several half-finished structures and bas-reliefs were found at the base of the two minor towers. Dr. Dinh Ba Hoa from the Binh Dinh Museum suggests the work was interrupted because the Champa king met with some problems.