Villagers renovating long-abandoned temple in Nakhon Sawan

Villagers in Thailand’s Nakhon Sawan province attempt to revive an abandoned temple

NAKHON SAWAN — An old Buddhist temple, long abandoned and left to ruin, is being renovated by local people for use as a meditation centre, near Ban Nasan village in tambon Nong Kradon of Muang district.

Source: Villagers renovating long-abandoned temple | Bangkok Post: news

Amid more demolishing, panel set up to evaluate Mahakan fort homes

The community at the Mahakan Fort continue to have their houses razed, but at the same time a panel has been set up to evaluate the historical value of some of the remaining houses. It looks futile at this stage, since even if the houses are preserved the living community has been actively destroyed?

A 10-member panel will be formed to look into the historical value of the remaining houses in the Mahakan Fort Community to determine whether they should be preserved, says a source close to City Hall.

Source: Panel to appraise Mahakan fort homes | Bangkok Post: lifestyle

New panel set up to adjudicate the Mahakan Fort community dispute

After uproar from multiple parties over the destruction of the community around the Mahakan Fort, a new panel has been set to determine the historic value of the remaining 24 houses.

Parties involved in settling the Mahakan Fort community land conflict appear to have gone back to square one as City Hall agreed yesterday to set up a new panel to handle the case.

Source: Mahakan Fort community row goes ‘back to square one’ | Bangkok Post: news

See Also: Old town communities leap to Mahakan Fort’s defence | Bangkok Post

Bagan temples: 224 to finish repairs before Thingyan, and 50 more after

The Myanmar Department of Archaeology and National Museum reports the upcoming completion of repairs 224 temples in Bagan damaged by last year’s earthquake, and repairs to another 50 to begin after the new year.

Source: Bagan: Earthquake-affected pagodas to be renovated | Eleven Myanmar

Ignoring expert advice, historic Bangkok house demolished

Despite designated at as a house of historic value by the administration itself, Bangkok City Hall proceeded with the demolition of a century-old house.

Mahakan Fort mourns loss of century-old house

Source: Mahakan Fort mourns loss of century-old house | Bangkok Post: news

See also: Bangkok pushes ahead with city’s facelift

Demolition of houses near historic Bangkok Fort

Despite appeals to their architectural value, the Bangkok administration proceeds with the demolishing of houses near a historic fort in Bangkok.

City Hall’s new demolition plan will put at risk houses featuring the Rama IX architectural style in Mahakan Fort Community, experts said on Saturday.

Source: Mahakan Fort’s historic houses to be demolished | Bangkok Post: news

See also: City Hall readies Mahakan demolition

The staircase of Phnom Kulen

Archaeologists turn their attention to a mysterious massive staircase on Phnom Kulen, thought to be constructed in Angkoran times.

The 487-meter ascent to sacred Phnom Kulen in Siem Reap province is steep and rocky. At some point between the ninth and 13th centuries, a powerful leader decided to forge a clearer path.

Source: Archaeologists Scale History of Ancient Staircase – The Cambodia Daily

Bagan quake roundup

On August 24, a magnitude 6.8 earthquake hit central Myanmar, which affected over 400 of the temples in Bagan causing structural damage and collapse in some cases. There were relatively little human fatalities, fortunately.

Damage to Sulamani temple in Bagan. Source: BBC
Damage to Sulamani temple in Bagan. Source: BBC

Myanmar earthquake kills three, damages scores of ancient temples [Link no longer active]
Channel NewsAsia, 24 August 2016

Myanmar earthquake: One dead and temples damaged
BBC, 24 August 2016

Myanmar Quake Damages at Least 185 Bagan Pagodas
AP, via Wall Street Journal, 24 August 2016

Myanmar earthquake harms pagodas in ancient city of Bagan
NewsNation, 24 August 2016

Powerful quake kills at least three, damages Bagan pagodas
Myanmar Times, 25 August 2016

Famous Bagan pagodas damaged
AFP, via The Tribune, 25 August 2016

Myanmar earthquake: Images from Bagan historic sites
BBC, 25 August 2016

Bagan After the Quake: Concerns Over Manhandling of Debris
The Irrawady, 25 August 2016

Myanmar Earthquake Damages Bagan Temples [Link no longer active]
AP, via US News, 25 August 2016

Than Zaw Oo: ‘A Natural Disaster Can’t Devalue Bagan’s Heritage’
The Irrawady, 25 August 2016

Director-General of UNESCO expresses solidarity with the people of Myanmar after earthquake in Bagan
Unesco, 26 August 2016

Myanmar President Visits Bagan to Survey Quake-Damaged Pagodas
RFA, via Malaysia Sun, 26 August 2016

Research teams assesses Bagan damage
The Nation, 26 August 2016

Don’t rush Bagan fixes: state counsellor
Myanmar Times, 26 August 2016

Quake destroys Bagan murals
Eleven Myanmar, 28 August 2016

Myanmar Earthquake Rattles Temples of Bagan
Artnet News, 29 August 2016

Nearly 400 Bagan pagodas damaged by earthquake: govt
Myanmar Times, 29 August 2016

Volunteers in Bagan Trained in Earthquake Recovery
The Irrawady, 29 August 2016

Damaged pagodas covered in quake-hit Bagan
Myanmar Times, 01 September 2016

Volunteers Help Rebuild Bagan
Myanmore, 02 September 2016

Bagan earthquake: Is there a silver lining for Myanmar?
BBC, 08 September 2016

Prohibited Bagan pagodas named
Eleven Myanmar, 09 September 2016

The Trouble With Temple Restoration in Myanmar
The Diplomat, 26 September 2016

Two Temples in Bagan Collapse Two Months After Earthquake
The Irrawady, 27 October 2016

The mystery of Suryavarman I’s temple solved

Dating of metal fixings in the architecture at the Baphuon temple in Angkor Thom have led researchers to conclude that it was built as the mountain temple of King Suryavarman I who reigned in the 11th century.

Baphuon. Source: Cambodia Daily 20160620
Baphuon. Source: Cambodia Daily 20160620

Metal Findings Give New Perspective on Angkorian History
Cambodia Daily, 20 June 2016

One thing that set Suryavarman I apart from other great kings—to the puzzlement of historians and archaeologists—was that he did not seem to have erected his own mountain temple: Jayavarman V built Ta Keo in the 10th century, Suryavarman II Angkor Wat in the early 12th century and Jayavarman VII the Bayon in the late 12th century.

But that mystery seems to have been solved thanks to cutting-edge research into the iron used to build the Baphuon temple, the second largest structure in Angkor Archaelogical Park after Angkor Wat.

This three-tiered pyramid was the monument that Suryavarman I built, according to carbon-dating of the metal used to hold the temple together.

“It’s very strange that a king with that amount of influence and power didn’t build himself anything in Angkor,” said archaeologist Mitch Hendrickson of the University of Illinois at Chicago, who headed the research team along with archaeometallurgist Stephanie Leroy of the Archaeomaterials and Alteration Prediction Laboratory in France.

Full story here.