Trailing the footsteps of Buddha’s disciples

The state archaeologists of Uttar Pradesh announce their intention to trace and document sites along the route taken by Buddha’s disciples, through Southeast Asian countries like Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia and Vietnam.

15 June 2006 (ExpressIndia) – The state archaeologists of Uttar Pradesh announce their intention to trace and document sites along the route taken by Buddha’s disciples, through Southeast Asian countries like Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia and Vietnam.

Trailing the footsteps of Buddha’s disciples

Which is why, the state’s archeology department has finally decided to track the route taken by Buddha’s disciples—Kumar Jeev, Kashyap and Matang— to spread his message of peace and harmony. The department will not only follow the land route, but also document the spots that retain their footsteps.

The project, titled “The Buddha Sandesh Yatra”, will span 11 countries. Beginning from Sarnath, the team will travel to Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, Cambodia, Vietnam, China, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Afganistan, Pakistan and Tibet.


Related Books:
The Buddhist World of Southeast Asia (Suny Series in Religion) by D. K. Swearer
The Canon in Southeast Asian Literature: Literatures of Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Phillippines, Thailand and Vietnam by D. Smyth
Sacred Rocks and Buddhist Caves in Thailand by C. Munier

Cradle of an early civilisation (Malaysia)

Artifact trade, ceramics, Philip Greco, weaponry, looting


14 June 2006 (The Star Online) – A feature on the archaelogical features of Bujang Valley in Kedah, Malaysia.

Cradle of an early civilisation

The Bujang Valley in Kedah was the bustling centre of a rich and prosperous kingdom between the third and 12th century AD.

It was then known as Nusantara, a Sanskrit word which means ‘seat of all felicities.’

The area, which was also called Bujanga or ‘Valley of the Serpent’ was Southeast Asia’s central trading entreport which dealt with cargo brought by Arab, Chinese, Indian as well as maritime traders from the Malay archipelago.

[Tags]Buddhist culture, Bujang Valley Archaeological Museum, Bujang valley, Hindu Culture, candis, Nusanatara, Kedah[/tags]

Related Books:
Journal of the Malayan Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, Vol. XXVIII, Pt. 1
Journal of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic society, Vol. XLIII, Part 1
Arts of Southeast Asia (World of Art) by F. Kerlogue
Hindu-Buddhist Architecture in Southeast Asia (Studies in Asian Art and Archaeology, Vol 19) by D. Chihara

Restoring Ngah Ibrahim's fort

Report on restoration works of a 150-year-old fort in Matang, Perak.

5 June 2006 (New Straits Times) – Report on restoration works of a 150-year-old fort in Matang, Perak.

New Straits Times, 5 June 2006

Restoring Ngah Ibrahim’s fort

The restoration of the 150-year-old fort in Matang built by Tengku Menteri Ngah Ibrahim, the richest Malay aristocrat of his time, is nearly complete.

The bad news is that the last leg of the restoration, the reconstruction of the fort’s two large watchtowers, is likely to be tricky.

Museums Department’s assistant curator Osman Kassim, who has been supervising the restoration and conservation of the fort since 2001, said the absence of data on the original shape and layout of two towers was hindering reconstruction.

Ancient landfall

A feature story on the archaeology of the Bujang Valley in Malaysia and connections with the South Indian Pallava dynasty.

4 June 2006 (The Hindu) – A feature story on the archaeology of the Bujang Valley in Malaysia and connections with the South Indian Pallava dynasty.

20060604 The Hindu

Ancient landfall

On a trip to Malaysia, we drove into the green Bujang Valley in Kedah, the oldest State in Malaysia. And we learnt that it is recognised as the oldest State because foreign sailors set up an ancient trading settlement there in the Fifth Century A.D. These “foreign sailors” were Tamils, subjects of the Pallavas. But the Bujang Valley had been mentioned in a Tamil poem, “Pattanopolai”, as far back as the Second or Third Century A.D. There, the Bujang Valley is called Kalagan, which philologists claim eventually gave rise to the modern-day Kedah.

All this, and much more, is given in great detail in the well-appointed Lembah Bujang Archaeological Museum at Bukit Batu Pahat. The Museum, in thick rain forests, is backed by the Kedah Peak, now known as Gunung Jerai and towering to a height of 2,100 metres above the flat hinterland plains of the Straits of Malacca. According to historian Dato James F. Augustin: “Pallava traders from India’s Coromandel Coast began to explore the eastern coast of the Bay of Bengal in search of spices, sandalwood, ivory, gold and tin.”


Related Books:
Journal of the Malayan Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, Vol. XXVIII, Pt. 1
Journal of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic society, Vol. XLIII, Part 1
Early History (The Encyclopedia of Malaysia) by Nik Hassan Shuhaimi Nik Abdul Rahman (Ed)

Caves of Malaysia

Caves of Malaysia is run by Liz Price, a speleologist and is a great resource to the caves in Malaysia, not just for archaeology but for geological, floral and faunal value too.

I came across this site while cross-referencing web sources for the defaced cave art post uploaded a few days ago. Caves of Malaysia is run by Liz Price, a speleologist and is a great resource to the caves in Malaysia, not just for archaeology but for geological, floral and faunal value too. It’s added on the permanent links collection.

Caves of Malaysia, by Liz Price
Caves of Malaysia, by Liz Price

Placing right value on our heritage

I must say it is to Malaysia’s credit that they are planning to set up a heritage register for their country. Oh why are the other countries so slow!

29 May 2006 (New Straits Times) – I must say it is to Malaysia’s credit that they are planning to set up a heritage register for their country. Oh why are the other countries so slow!

Placing right value on our heritage

Under the Act, sweeping changes will be introduced.

Besides recognising intangible items as having heritage value, it will also see a master list of heritage items and sites created.

A Department of National Heritage has been set up and a commissioner appointed…

She is Prof Datuk Dr Zuraina Majid from Universiti Sains Malaysia. She is an expert in archaeology.

Prehistoric drawings risk being lost

27 May 2006 (The Star)

Prehistoric drawings risk being lost

Prehistoric drawings and inscriptions in more than 15 caves might be defaced due to lack of efforts to protect them, said National Museum archaeologist Sanim Ahmad.

He said the prehistoric drawings found on the walls of the Tambun Cave near Ipoh were so badly-damaged or smeared by graffiti that they were hardly-visible now.

Bentara Budaya hosts keris lovers

19 June 2006 (Jakarta Post) – I had not known that the Keris has been declared a world heritage item.

Bentara Budaya hosts keris lovers

More than 500 krises, or kerises as they are locally known, are on display at the Bentara Budaya Jakarta until June 23.

The 10-day exhibition showcases traditional daggers up to 500 years old from a number of private collectors across the country. It also features the work of modern kris makers, or empu, such as Sukamdi, Subandi, Yanto and Yantono.


Related Books
Art of Indonesia Pusaka by J. Miksic

Unearth facts on Sabah: CM

Archaeological potential in Sabah?

19 May 2006 (Daily Express) – Archaeological potential in Sabah?

Unearth facts on Sabah: CM

Chief Minister Datuk Seri Musa Aman urged researchers and historians to conduct more studies and research to unearth as many facts as possible on the early history of Borneo, particularly Sabah.

Musa was made to understand that the UMS History Programme had been doing research related to the Sabah and Sarawak history resulting in many new findings being made.

Among them were the existences of the Marudu ancient government, Sharif Rum Sharif Osman rule, Raja Tua Brunei, early maritime trade in northern Sabah and findings of several thousand year old settlements.


Related Books:
Early Kingdoms of the Indonesian Archipelago and the Malay Peninsula by P. M. Munoz
Sabah’s Heritage: A Brief Introduction to Sabaih’s History and Heritage
The Prehistory of Sabah by T. Harrison and B. Harrison

Artefacts found at 100-year-old temple

8 May 2006 (The Star) –

Artefacts found at 100-year-old temple

Century-old artefacts have been uncovered during digging works at the 100-year-old Da Seng Ngan Temple here.

Ipoh Benevolent Society chairman Loke Yee Fatt said among them were copper statues of the Buddha, porcelain statues of Kuan Kong (God of War), urns, candleholders and chinaware.