Sitting on ancient ruins

Ambivalent feelings about posting here. News of excavated artefacts is always interesting, but some aspects of the story (eg, hearing voices) are more dodgy.

6 July 2006 (New Straits Times) – Ambivalent feelings about posting here. News of excavated artefacts is always interesting, but some aspects of the story (eg, hearing voices) are more dodgy. Many thanks to Liz of Caves of Malaysia for pointing this out to me.

Sitting on ancient ruins

KOTA TINGGI: Since they moved there in 1975, settlers of Felda Bukit Aping Timur in Kota Tinggi have had the nagging feeling there is more to their land than meets the eye.

They believe they might be sitting on the ruins of an early civilisation.

They have unearthed large quantities of pots, jars and other artifacts while working their smallholdings, not to mention the “strange events” that have occurred.


Related Books:
Early History (The Encyclopedia of Malaysia) by Nik Hassan Shuhaimi Nik Abdul Rahman (Ed)

Bigfoot named as Johor Hominid

Researchers have set up a website on the entity formerly known as the Johor Bigfoot (now known as the Johor Hominid) with the aim of presenting their findings and arguments towards an existing, living hominid species in the jungles of Johor.

2 July 2006 (New Straits Times) – Researchers have set up a website on the entity formerly known as the Johor Bigfoot (now known as the Johor Hominid) with the aim of presenting their findings and arguments towards an existing, living hominid species in the jungles of Johor. Given that the current evidence is still tenuous at best, I’m not inclined to believe of the existence of the bigfoot/hominid yet. Stay tuned as developments come about!

www.johorhominid.org

Bigfoot named as Johor Hominid

A website set up by local researchers of the Johor Bigfoot has named the elusive giant biped as the Johor Hominid.

The johorhominid.org website stated the Johor Hominid phenomenon was probably the most significant and mind-shattering discovery in anthropology

Reverse evolution theory about the Johor Bigfoot

More news on the Johor Bigfoot, with a paleontology scientist conjuecturing that the Johor Bigfoot may have been/be a homo erectus who has undergone reverse evolution. It seems to me at this point that the news is still too sensational, as the conjecture is remains what it is: a conjecture, and nothing conclusive has been made. Stay tuned for this saga to unfold!

30 June 2006 (New Straits Times) – More news on the Johor Bigfoot, with a paleontology scientist conjuecturing that the Johor Bigfoot may have been/be a homo erectus who has undergone reverse evolution. It seems to me at this point that the news is still too sensational, as the conjecture is remains what it is: a conjecture, and nothing conclusive has been made. Stay tuned for this saga to unfold!

New Straits Times, 30 June 2006

Reverse evolution theory about the Johor Bigfoot

The Johor Bigfoot could be a Homo erectus that had undergone “reverse evolution”.

Sean Ang, a scientist from Kuala Lumpur who had analysed the prehistoric Perak Man excavated by Universiti Sains Malaysia in 1994, said based on evidence compiled about the creature by biodiversity researcher Vincent Chow, he thought the creature might have been in existence for more than 65,000 years.

“I concur with Chow’s findings that this could be an unknown species that went through reverse evolution to end up as a less intelligent creature than Peking Man, who could use fire and tools.

Ageless charm of the keris

The Keris or Kris is a Malay blade that is a distiguishable piece of Malay material culture. The Muzium Negara also has an excellent collection of keris.

30 May 2006 (New Straits Times) – The Keris or Kris is a Malay blade that is a distiguishable piece of Malay material culture. The Muzium Negara also has an excellent collection of keris.

Ageless charm of the keris

BUSINESSMAN Rusnan Ngadio shares his experience with the keris (a traditional Malay dagger) with the layman through his collection of more than 5,000 handmade blades worth RM100,000.

“A civilisation is reflected by its cultural heritage and once that knowledge in arts and craft is lost, all will be gone. Today, there are fewer than a dozen keris makers in Peninsular Malaysia. If their trade is not preserved, we will definitely lose our cultural identity,” said the 43-year-old.

Malay hero returning home at last

The remains of Ngah Ibrahim will be repatriated to the Matang Fort at the end of the year. According to the report, his body was buried at the Al-Junid muslim cemetary in Singapore.

19 June 2006 (New Straits Times) – The remains of Ngah Ibrahim will be repatriated to the Matang Fort at the end of the year. According to the report, his body was buried at the Al-Junid muslim cemetary in Singapore.

Malay hero returning home at last

More than a century after his death in exile, Tengku Menteri Ngah Ibrahim’s dream of coming home will be fulfilled at the end of the year.

Buried in an obscure corner of Singapore’s Al-Junid Muslim cemetery, Ngah Ibrahim’s remains would be repatriated and reburied in accordance with the customary rites for Malay aristocrats, befitting his stature as a powerful and influential menteri (chieftain), National Heritage Department curator Khalid Syed Ali said.

Kedah's tourism treasure trove

Bujang Valley in Kedah, Malaysia to be slated for tourism redevelopment, based on its rich heritage value.

16 June 2006 (New Straits Times) – Bujang Valley in Kedah, Malaysia to be slated for tourism redevelopment, based on its rich heritage value. Thanks to Liz for this link.

Kedah’s tourism treasure trove

New Straits Times, 16 June 2006

Lembah Bujang, home to one of the country’s oldest and richest archaeological sites, is poised to become the latest gem in the State’s tourism treasure trove.

Realising its potential as a major tourist attraction, Menteri Besar Datuk Seri Mahdzir Khalid has invited local archaeologists and historians to help design a blueprint for the development of Lembah Bujang. He said the first meeting on this would be held next week.


Related Books:
Early Kingdoms of the Indonesian Archipelago and the Malay Peninsula by P. M. Munoz
Early History (The Encyclopedia of Malaysia) by Nik Hassan Shuhaimi Nik Abdul Rahman (Ed)

Trailing the footsteps of Buddha’s disciples

The state archaeologists of Uttar Pradesh announce their intention to trace and document sites along the route taken by Buddha’s disciples, through Southeast Asian countries like Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia and Vietnam.

15 June 2006 (ExpressIndia) – The state archaeologists of Uttar Pradesh announce their intention to trace and document sites along the route taken by Buddha’s disciples, through Southeast Asian countries like Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia and Vietnam.

Trailing the footsteps of Buddha’s disciples

Which is why, the state’s archeology department has finally decided to track the route taken by Buddha’s disciples—Kumar Jeev, Kashyap and Matang— to spread his message of peace and harmony. The department will not only follow the land route, but also document the spots that retain their footsteps.

The project, titled “The Buddha Sandesh Yatra”, will span 11 countries. Beginning from Sarnath, the team will travel to Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, Cambodia, Vietnam, China, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Afganistan, Pakistan and Tibet.


Related Books:
The Buddhist World of Southeast Asia (Suny Series in Religion) by D. K. Swearer
The Canon in Southeast Asian Literature: Literatures of Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Phillippines, Thailand and Vietnam by D. Smyth
Sacred Rocks and Buddhist Caves in Thailand by C. Munier

Cradle of an early civilisation (Malaysia)

Artifact trade, ceramics, Philip Greco, weaponry, looting


14 June 2006 (The Star Online) – A feature on the archaelogical features of Bujang Valley in Kedah, Malaysia.

Cradle of an early civilisation

The Bujang Valley in Kedah was the bustling centre of a rich and prosperous kingdom between the third and 12th century AD.

It was then known as Nusantara, a Sanskrit word which means ‘seat of all felicities.’

The area, which was also called Bujanga or ‘Valley of the Serpent’ was Southeast Asia’s central trading entreport which dealt with cargo brought by Arab, Chinese, Indian as well as maritime traders from the Malay archipelago.

[Tags]Buddhist culture, Bujang Valley Archaeological Museum, Bujang valley, Hindu Culture, candis, Nusanatara, Kedah[/tags]

Related Books:
Journal of the Malayan Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, Vol. XXVIII, Pt. 1
Journal of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic society, Vol. XLIII, Part 1
Arts of Southeast Asia (World of Art) by F. Kerlogue
Hindu-Buddhist Architecture in Southeast Asia (Studies in Asian Art and Archaeology, Vol 19) by D. Chihara

Restoring Ngah Ibrahim's fort

Report on restoration works of a 150-year-old fort in Matang, Perak.

5 June 2006 (New Straits Times) – Report on restoration works of a 150-year-old fort in Matang, Perak.

New Straits Times, 5 June 2006

Restoring Ngah Ibrahim’s fort

The restoration of the 150-year-old fort in Matang built by Tengku Menteri Ngah Ibrahim, the richest Malay aristocrat of his time, is nearly complete.

The bad news is that the last leg of the restoration, the reconstruction of the fort’s two large watchtowers, is likely to be tricky.

Museums Department’s assistant curator Osman Kassim, who has been supervising the restoration and conservation of the fort since 2001, said the absence of data on the original shape and layout of two towers was hindering reconstruction.

Ancient landfall

A feature story on the archaeology of the Bujang Valley in Malaysia and connections with the South Indian Pallava dynasty.

4 June 2006 (The Hindu) – A feature story on the archaeology of the Bujang Valley in Malaysia and connections with the South Indian Pallava dynasty.

20060604 The Hindu

Ancient landfall

On a trip to Malaysia, we drove into the green Bujang Valley in Kedah, the oldest State in Malaysia. And we learnt that it is recognised as the oldest State because foreign sailors set up an ancient trading settlement there in the Fifth Century A.D. These “foreign sailors” were Tamils, subjects of the Pallavas. But the Bujang Valley had been mentioned in a Tamil poem, “Pattanopolai”, as far back as the Second or Third Century A.D. There, the Bujang Valley is called Kalagan, which philologists claim eventually gave rise to the modern-day Kedah.

All this, and much more, is given in great detail in the well-appointed Lembah Bujang Archaeological Museum at Bukit Batu Pahat. The Museum, in thick rain forests, is backed by the Kedah Peak, now known as Gunung Jerai and towering to a height of 2,100 metres above the flat hinterland plains of the Straits of Malacca. According to historian Dato James F. Augustin: “Pallava traders from India’s Coromandel Coast began to explore the eastern coast of the Bay of Bengal in search of spices, sandalwood, ivory, gold and tin.”


Related Books:
Journal of the Malayan Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, Vol. XXVIII, Pt. 1
Journal of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic society, Vol. XLIII, Part 1
Early History (The Encyclopedia of Malaysia) by Nik Hassan Shuhaimi Nik Abdul Rahman (Ed)