Placing right value on our heritage

I must say it is to Malaysia’s credit that they are planning to set up a heritage register for their country. Oh why are the other countries so slow!

29 May 2006 (New Straits Times) – I must say it is to Malaysia’s credit that they are planning to set up a heritage register for their country. Oh why are the other countries so slow!

Placing right value on our heritage

Under the Act, sweeping changes will be introduced.

Besides recognising intangible items as having heritage value, it will also see a master list of heritage items and sites created.

A Department of National Heritage has been set up and a commissioner appointed…

She is Prof Datuk Dr Zuraina Majid from Universiti Sains Malaysia. She is an expert in archaeology.

Prehistoric drawings risk being lost

27 May 2006 (The Star)

Prehistoric drawings risk being lost

Prehistoric drawings and inscriptions in more than 15 caves might be defaced due to lack of efforts to protect them, said National Museum archaeologist Sanim Ahmad.

He said the prehistoric drawings found on the walls of the Tambun Cave near Ipoh were so badly-damaged or smeared by graffiti that they were hardly-visible now.

Bentara Budaya hosts keris lovers

19 June 2006 (Jakarta Post) – I had not known that the Keris has been declared a world heritage item.

Bentara Budaya hosts keris lovers

More than 500 krises, or kerises as they are locally known, are on display at the Bentara Budaya Jakarta until June 23.

The 10-day exhibition showcases traditional daggers up to 500 years old from a number of private collectors across the country. It also features the work of modern kris makers, or empu, such as Sukamdi, Subandi, Yanto and Yantono.


Related Books
Art of Indonesia Pusaka by J. Miksic

Unearth facts on Sabah: CM

Archaeological potential in Sabah?

19 May 2006 (Daily Express) – Archaeological potential in Sabah?

Unearth facts on Sabah: CM

Chief Minister Datuk Seri Musa Aman urged researchers and historians to conduct more studies and research to unearth as many facts as possible on the early history of Borneo, particularly Sabah.

Musa was made to understand that the UMS History Programme had been doing research related to the Sabah and Sarawak history resulting in many new findings being made.

Among them were the existences of the Marudu ancient government, Sharif Rum Sharif Osman rule, Raja Tua Brunei, early maritime trade in northern Sabah and findings of several thousand year old settlements.


Related Books:
Early Kingdoms of the Indonesian Archipelago and the Malay Peninsula by P. M. Munoz
Sabah’s Heritage: A Brief Introduction to Sabaih’s History and Heritage
The Prehistory of Sabah by T. Harrison and B. Harrison

Artefacts found at 100-year-old temple

8 May 2006 (The Star) –

Artefacts found at 100-year-old temple

Century-old artefacts have been uncovered during digging works at the 100-year-old Da Seng Ngan Temple here.

Ipoh Benevolent Society chairman Loke Yee Fatt said among them were copper statues of the Buddha, porcelain statues of Kuan Kong (God of War), urns, candleholders and chinaware.

Ethnic use of Chinese jars

Feature on the “Odyssey: From China to the Ulu” at the Sarawak Museum.

13 April 2006 (The Star) – Feature on the “Odyssey: From China to the Ulu” at the Sarawak Museum.

Ethnic use of Chinese jars

The exhibition, “Ceramic Odyssey: From China to the Ulu” features nearly 100 pieces of Chinese ceramics from the museum’s extensive collection in a thematic display based on their uses by various local communities.

A traditional death ritual of the Melanau was placing blue and white Qing plates under the head, shoulders, feet and hands of the deceased.

Maritime Asia

Maritime Asia is a very detailed site about the ongoing Maritime Archaeology Malaysia exhibition at the Muzium Negara. It features the finds of 7 shipwrecks located off the coasts of Malaysia and detailed information about each of the ships finds, ceramics and maritime archaeology.

Maritime Asia is a very detailed site about the ongoing Maritime Archaeology Malaysia exhibition at the Muzium Negara. It features the finds of 7 shipwrecks located off the coasts of Malaysia and detailed information about each of the ships finds, ceramics and maritime archaeology. I managed to catch the exhibition earlier in January this year and I must admit that it is an incredible exhibition with a good deal of 14 to 18 c. material culture.

Cultural and historical treasure trove

Merbok, Kedah preparing for development as a cultural heritage and eco-tourism centre.

3 May 2006 (The Star) – Merbok, Kedah preparing for development as a cultural heritage and eco-tourism centre.

Cultural and historical treasure trove

MERBOK in Kedah with the largest mangrove forest in the country and a river that flows into the Straits of Malacca is a centre of ecological treasure…

Bujang Valley containing ruins of Hindu and Buddhist temples in Merbok lends a historical importance.

It used to be an important trading centre centuries ago.

Related Books
Journal of the Malayan Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, Vol. XXVIII, Pt. 1
Journal of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic society, Vol. XLIII, Part 1

Archaeologist Says "Lost City" of Johor Does Not Exist

Authorities deny existence of lost Johor city. Something doesn’t add up. If they conducted the field survey in July last year, why break the news 10 months later? Read the independent researcher’s side of the story.

28 Apr 2006 (Bernama) – Authorities deny existence of lost Johor city. Something doesn’t add up. If they conducted the field survey in July last year, why break the news 10 months later? Read the independent researcher’s side of the story.

Archaeologist Says Johor “Lost City” Does Not Exist

The “lost city” of Gelanggi or Linggiu, claimed to have been hidden in the jungles of Johor for more than a thousand years, does not exist, said an archaeologist in the National Heritage Department.

Khalid Syed Ali, the curator of archaeology in the department’s research and development division, said a team of researchers carried out a study over a month in July last year but found no evidence of the “lost city”.

A tale of two cities – Raimy Che Ross' side

Raimy Che Ross shares his (different) side of the story behind the lost city of Johor.

15 Jun 2005 (malaysiakini.com) – Raimy Che Ross shares his (different) side of the story behind the lost city of Johor.

Discovery insight: Dumber and dumber

Somewhere in the underground vaults of a Jabatan Kerajaan’s Swedenborgian space, lurk two files; one marked “Gelanggi”; the other, “Linggui”.

The folder with “Linggui” scribbled over its cover should, by now, be about half a yard thick and bursting at its spine. Stuffed within are presumably minutes to clandestine meetings, press clippings, confidential memos, dodgy expedition plans, nefarious schemes, plus the frantic drafts of the forthcoming Cabinet Report due in August.

The other binder, bearing “Gelanggi” across its surface, would in comparison be quite a slim file. It would contain nothing more than a few personal letters and printed e-mails written by yours truly, my CV, perhaps copies of the JMBRAS article, and my original draft proposal for a proper follow-up expedition to validate the find.

Reason for the disparity?

Bolehlah-land buffoonery.